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Author Topic: "Upgrades" affect resale?  (Read 1612 times)
GIGGLER
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« on: July 22, 2005, 04:05:26 PM »

Funny how even if you make an "upgrade" to make an instrument "better", i.e., install a pickup, you may be lowering the resale value because you altered from the original. Any upgrades that are actually worth it in regards to resale value of a piece?

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« Reply #1 on: July 22, 2005, 04:20:12 PM »

Depends on were your selling it.I don't pay extra for upgrades but then I don't charge extra for them either.Resale to me is all based on the guitar it self.upgrades may or may not move it faster but I don't pay extra for them.





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dbirchett
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« Reply #2 on: July 22, 2005, 04:20:36 PM »

I think that's going to depend on the buyer. Most aftermarket upgrades won't help you unless it's something the buyer wanted in the first place.
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« Reply #3 on: July 22, 2005, 10:22:09 PM »

In general I think pickups, special pins, etc,, are like adding mud flaps to a car in terms of resale value. Some people will devalue an instrument if original parts have been swapped out. I'm not sure that makes sense as very few new instruments have high collectable value.
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« Reply #4 on: July 22, 2005, 10:42:45 PM »

I think that's going to depend on the buyer.

I agree.  I play amplified a lot.  Therefore, I'm going to value a guitar higher, if it has a good pickup in it.  The thing is that most folks have their own preference about the type of pickup they would want in their guitar.  Things like saddles, pins, etc., probably wouldn't effect the price for me, but they might make the guitar more attractive (i.e. easier to sell), than one without those upgrades.
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« Reply #5 on: July 23, 2005, 12:24:40 AM »

My brother used to sell used cars and there's a saying in the business that "there's an a** for every seat"

I think that holds true with a guitar that has upgrades.
If you get lucky and find that person who was looking for exactly what you're offering you may be golden.
But chances are likely that you're going to eat the cost of the upgrades.
Sometimes it's best to return the guitar back to original as much as possible and save the upgrades for the next guitar or attempt to sell them seperately.
I couldn't tell you how many times I've purchased ebony tuner buttons and sold them off with the guitar, basically giving them away for free so to speak.
These days I recycle my ebony buttons from one guitar to the next.
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Miata13
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« Reply #6 on: July 23, 2005, 07:02:55 PM »

Well..guess I'm proof of the saying "there's an a** for every seat" as this spring, I considered myself lucky to be able to purchase KDonovan's OMV-03R....his "upgrades" matched my intentions perfectly.  He'd put on ebony tumer buttons, Bob Colosi bone saddle and did an excellent job "orsino'izing" that sitka/rosewood guitar.

It replaced a recently sold rosewood Taylor 414rce that was just a bit too big in the lower 'bout for comfort for me (16" vrs 15") and I'd since "discovered" Larrivee with my OO-05 and Koa Parlor.

So in Kevin's case, his "upgrades" caught my eye and ended up making the sale.   Guess my point is, make your guitar one YOU like...if you later want/have to sell it; it's a big world and bigger (?) internet.

Enjoy.   Rick
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« Reply #7 on: July 23, 2005, 08:25:27 PM »

best thing to do is just include all the original parts with the sale...throw the original pins, saddle etc in the case...of course that doesnt work for pickguards or things like that.    but the little things....
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kdonovan
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« Reply #8 on: July 23, 2005, 11:34:47 PM »

Rick,
   Glad to hear that you are still enjoying that guitar.  On that guitar I considered the costs of the upgrades minimal compared to the enjoyment I got out of customizing it.
I never would of even had the nerve to even attempt half of the changes I made to that guitar if it hadn't been for kind people on this forum and the willingness to share information. I just wish the rosewood had worked out for me :rolleyes  I'm glad it found a good home.
Cheers,
kdonovan
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kdonovan

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« Reply #9 on: July 24, 2005, 12:38:18 PM »

I think it depends on what the buyer is looking for, and does what your selling match their
wants.  If you changed nut, saddle & pins, and throw in the originals with the sale I believe
you can.  When you get into the electronics, that I believe is a personal taste, and could
be iffy.
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« Reply #10 on: July 25, 2005, 05:20:04 AM »

The root of the problem is what people wants... ...when they first fell in love with a guitar.   So if someone first fell in love with a 70's larrivee highend model, that's what they want.  If it's changed, there is a feeling of not getting what was the original goal.   Especially if you replace parts that can't be retro fitted (i.e. cutting a barn door for a pickup).

But this only extends to these instrument with values above their intrinsinc value to make music (unless the buyer feels the upgrade component is a downgrade from their personal asthetic taste).  So with the cheaper models, upgrades will most like NOT decrease their value, and actually increase them (dont expect much though).  So let's say you have an early 3-series larrivee, and you put ebony tuners on them, that will probably make the instrument hold the same value if not more (albeit very slightly).

Finally, it all depends on the upgrade too.  Trust me, I wont complain if you remove plastic pins and replaced them with fossil walrus ivory.  Even for a high-end larrivee classical, I wont exactly feel ripped off if you decide to put 300-clams-a-pop Gilbert precision tuners on them and sell the instrument to me for the same price.   Unless you are a collector, of course, in that case, originality is all that counts.
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« Reply #11 on: June 07, 2006, 02:25:18 PM »

He'd put on ebony tumer buttons, Bob Colosi bone saddle and did an excellent job "orsino'izing" that sitka/rosewood guitar.

On the other hand, I have seen several 03 Larrivees for sale here that I would have purchased had they not been polished. Polishing a satin finish guitar is not an attractive change to me.

Jim
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Ratishna
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« Reply #12 on: June 07, 2006, 03:57:25 PM »

Another issue is reversibility.  If you change tuners but don't drill new holes, you can keep the original tuners and return to stock for a new owner.  But anytime you start drilling holes - strap buttons, most pickups, new tuners - or adding inlay, those are not reversable and may detract from the value of a guitar.  Even adding a pickguard or armrest can cause a 'tan line' that isn't easily reversible.

E. Shoaf
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