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Author Topic: Is the LV body size making my three lower fingers fall asleep?  (Read 616 times)
jox51
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« on: July 02, 2005, 06:52:55 PM »

When I play for about 30 minutes I notice that my bottom 2 or 3 fingers start to fall asleep. My shoulder does sit kinda high so it can be affecting the circulation to my hand. Would an OM size help sit my shoulder lower? If so then I will probably have to sell or trade my LV-05mte.
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jmhyer
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« Reply #1 on: July 02, 2005, 09:26:16 PM »

...an ulnar nerve problem.  Could be caused by pressure on the nerve at/near the elbow or pressure under or near the armpit.  A smaller-bodied guitar might indeed help.  Also (while not always practical), try playing while standing (rather than sitting).  This may also help.

Does someone close to you have an OM or parlor sized guitar?  Maybe you could trade for a while to see if that helps before you go out and buy another axe.
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Jerry  #698

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rpg51
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« Reply #2 on: July 02, 2005, 09:35:56 PM »

Maybe try playing in the classical position, guitar on the left leg?
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Rob


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jmhyer
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« Reply #3 on: July 02, 2005, 09:39:41 PM »

Maybe try playing in the classical position, guitar on the left leg?

Also a good idea!
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Jerry  #698

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LittleBrother
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« Reply #4 on: July 02, 2005, 10:25:41 PM »

Smaller guitar or even a large guitar with a thinner body does the same thing. The L is not a small guitar. It's the identical size of a Gibson J-45 Jumbo and the same size lower bout as a 16" Dreadnought. The nice sloped shoulder kinda visually tricks you into thinking it's not that big but it is. I suffer from those same issues and always have. Even when I was young. Posture seems to be the key plus not playing when I first wake up unless I am circulating good or standing up. I have bigger guitars and necks that I play live or in the evening and I dont ever have an issue. Then I own a small parlor or small bodys for 75% of my playing but I dont just sit around the house playing jumbos and dreadnoughts. Another thing that can aggravate these things is straining your hands and muscles with activities like "power tools", riding dirt bikes and those little hand exercise tools. More than anything the cause for me us usually cramped, slumped or twisted posture of my whole body and back. Of course hanging the arm over on those veins and nerves is not a huge help either. Good luck with it. You probably don't have to loose the "L" model but I would experiment with posture and warmup exercises to increase circulation and you might also look into one of those ARM PAD rests from www.jpstrings.com . The classical position is pretty cool. Especially for recording but it's not practical all the time and you might need some sort of foot stool which brings up another great point. Old bar rooms and saloons have a small brass rail running around the base of the bar so people can place one foot on it and straighten out their spine. It's alot like lifting your legs on a pillow in bed to straighten your spine. Maybe placing one foot on a block or stand will help. I have an old shoe shine boy box I bought at a yard sale I use sometimes when recording for long periods. One other thing I do alot is walk around or stand on the back porch and play with a strap on. I love those little planet wave jigs you connect to the headstock and the strap. It positions my guitars perfectly and I stand with my back straight and I can play for a long time that way and walk around like a doofus deflecting guitar waves all over the house until someone complains! ;)

Thanks
Doug
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jox51
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« Reply #5 on: July 02, 2005, 10:56:01 PM »

Thanks man, thats great help.
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dreamsinger
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« Reply #6 on: July 03, 2005, 03:58:43 AM »

...an ulnar nerve problem.  Could be caused by pressure on the nerve at/near the elbow or pressure under or near the armpit.  A smaller-bodied guitar might indeed help.  Also (while not always practical), try playing while standing (rather than sitting).  This may also help.

Does someone close to you have an OM or parlor sized guitar?  Maybe you could trade for a while to see if that helps before you go out and buy another axe.

Assuming you're playing seated, try a classical approach of putting the guitar on your left leg and using a step to elevate your left foot. That and having the right chair makes all the difference in the world for me. I also regularly do stretching exercises before I play.
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Dreamsinger
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« Reply #7 on: July 03, 2005, 04:35:04 AM »

...an ulnar nerve problem.  Could be caused by pressure on the nerve at/near the elbow...

This nerve passes thru a "tunnel",  much like the infamous "carpal tunnel" which causes a lot of hand problems, and can be exacerbated by another one of our favorite activities, "mousing".  If you are at the computer a lot, you might want to try a "roller ball" mouse if the problem is not relieved by changes the other have suggested in playing position.
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