Pages: 1 [2]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Cheap, simple, windows recording program?  (Read 3737 times)
rpg51
Senior Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 671




Ignore
« Reply #20 on: June 13, 2005, 11:11:20 AM »

Didn't have as much time as I needed this weekend but I did figure out where the occasional scratchy noises are coming from.  My brand new Dell fancy this that and the other thing laptop.  Dell tells me there was a problem with the mother boards and they are replacing them.  Should be done today or tomorrow.  We'll see. 

I installed everything on my wife's desktop and it worked well.  So, for now anyway, I'm gonna hang on to the hardware and work at it a bit more.

My sense is that I may have the wrong mic.  I have a Rode NT-1A.  Large dia condensor mic.  It picks up every little noise all over the room.  Its pretty amazing in that way.  But, if I am trying to focus on the guitar - should I be using a more focused mic?  Any suggestions in the under $200 range?  Way under would be great! 

Also, what is the best way to equalize the tone a bit - sometimes sounds a little heavy on the base and light on the treble. 
Logged

Rob


Bourgeois JOM Cedar
Bourgeois Vintage OM
Bourgeois Vintage D
Gibson A4 Mandolin (1916)
ronmac
Gold Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4051


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #21 on: June 13, 2005, 05:45:18 PM »

Hi Rob,

Looks like you are making progress and getting things ironed out. It will all be worth it once you hit the finish line.

The NT1A is a very nice mic. I use two of them in a lot of different situations. Just finished a classical recording with them on a Yamaha C7 Grand Piano. Nice!

Being large diameter they are very sensitive to room ambience. Unless you are going to record in a very quiet environment you are probably better served using a small diameter cardiod pattern condensor. Prices are all over the map. I have heard some nice quality recordings done by Forum members using the inexpensive Marshall 603S. Another inexpensive mic that is getting godd reviews is the KEL HM1. $99 delivered with a money back guarantee.

When it comes to equalization the most important thing to do is experiment with different mic placements. Once you get it close to how you want it to sound you can then gently tweak the EQ to suit. The sound you get from smaller diameter mics, being more focused, will vary greatly depending on positioning.

Good luck.
Logged

Ron

rpg51
Senior Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 671




Ignore
« Reply #22 on: June 13, 2005, 05:52:17 PM »

Yea, I think I am going to unload this Rode mic.  Anyone have any interest?  I bought it used but it looks great and seems to work great - just not what I need at this point.  It has a shock mount included.  I think I paid in the vacininty of $130 -150 ???  If anyone is interested let me know - I can take some pics if need be.  Even take it back if you don't like it if you pay the postage. 

On the eq issue, once I get the mic placement - what should I use to tweak eq?  The PC? 
Logged

Rob


Bourgeois JOM Cedar
Bourgeois Vintage OM
Bourgeois Vintage D
Gibson A4 Mandolin (1916)
Woodbadger
Senior Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 214




Ignore
« Reply #23 on: June 13, 2005, 07:22:53 PM »

Rob,
Hope you don't mind me jumping in. I am in the process of setting up my own little home recording environment. I went the digital hard disc recorder route instead PC-based (I can't get the room where my computer is quiet enough!)


However, mic placement is common to both environments!!! Anyway, I found the following link to be very useful. Hope it helps.
Micing acoustic guitar

I went with small capsule condenser mics (along the lines of the Marshall MXL603s mentioned).
(BTW there is a pair of the Marshalls currently available at
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=41466&item=7328637991&rd=1&ssPageName=WDVW

Good luck!
Logged

Ian (in Cedar Creek, TX)
1974 Eko Ranger VI
2002 Larrivee LV10E
2007 McIlroy A25C

"When you're tired, and can't do anything, don't do anything. And while you're not doing anything, practice" - Robert Fripp
rockstar_not
Gold Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2310


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #24 on: June 13, 2005, 07:30:45 PM »

Before you sell your Rode, most LDC mics are going to be fairly sensitive - so hold on for now.

I would recommend building yourself a little GOBO - basically a portable wall with an absorptive surface that you can put between your mic and the room.  Makes a world of difference.

I've got pix of the one I built on my webpage at www.geocities.com/lakesmusicpage

If you still need to get a different mic, then you are going to need one with a hyper-cardioid pattern.  The Rode is just Cardioid, which will have quite a bit of off-axis sensitivity.

In my signature, it has a link for my soundclick.com page, where the song "Loser" features just my vocals and my Larry L-03 recorded with a mic that is very similar to your Rode.  Recorded in the same room as my noisy computer - but the GOBO is in between the mic and the computer, with the off-axis pointing at the GOBO.

-Scott
Logged

2000 L-03-E
2012 Epiphone Nighthawk Custom Reissue
1985 Peavey Milestone
2004 SX SPJ-62 Bass
2008 Valencia Solid Cedar Top Classical
2015 Taylor 414ce - won in drawing
2016 Ibanez SR655BBF

My Sound Cloud
rpg51
Senior Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 671




Ignore
« Reply #25 on: June 13, 2005, 08:49:34 PM »

Its not so much the computer noise - my laptop makes very little noise - its every little movement of my guitar on my lap, against my belly etc.,  chair squeaks and the like.  I appreciate the advise.  It is very helpful.  I need to keep this very simple.  I know a lot of you are into making really nice recordings and there may come a time when I get more into this.  At this point I don't have the time or inclination to build sound walls etc.  If need be I will just live with the extraneous noise.  But, if I could pick up a different mic for $100 or so and if it would make a substantial difference in the extraneous noise department, I would do it because it would involve very little time and no new money. 
Logged

Rob


Bourgeois JOM Cedar
Bourgeois Vintage OM
Bourgeois Vintage D
Gibson A4 Mandolin (1916)
rpg51
Senior Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 671




Ignore
« Reply #26 on: June 13, 2005, 09:08:41 PM »

I was persuaded to go with a mic instead of a pick up.  I beginning to wonder if for my purposes I would be better off with a pick up.  I am sure in a studio a pair of mics does a better job. But I don't have a studio and I probably never will.  Wouldn't it be a  lot easier for me to just plug in a pick up?  I'm going to try that this evening and see how it goes.  I'll try my Les Paul.  What do you all think? 
Logged

Rob


Bourgeois JOM Cedar
Bourgeois Vintage OM
Bourgeois Vintage D
Gibson A4 Mandolin (1916)
Zach
Admin
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 868



« Reply #27 on: June 13, 2005, 09:34:07 PM »

A Les Paul, or any electric, is not going to sound very good plugged straight in, but it depends on what you're going for I guess. 

As far as noise from chairs, the guitar rubbing, etc., that's just part of it. :GRN>  It takes practice, but you just have to learn to play without making those noises.  I wouldn't worry about it too much.  There are plenty of professional recordings out that have lots of extra noises from squeaks to traffic outside. 

Some people are perfectly fine recording an acoustic with a pickup, but I avoid it at all costs.  To me, even live, a pickup is a last resort only.  Everyone has different opinions on what sounds good though.  :GRN>

I would suggest to keep working with your mic.  In the end, I think it you'll be able to get the results you want.  Remember, some of these clips posted are from people that have been doing it (recording) for years.
Logged


Zach
rpg51
Senior Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 671




Ignore
« Reply #28 on: June 14, 2005, 12:00:55 PM »

I tried an acoustic guitar with a pick up and it really isn't very satisfying.  I'll keep fiddling with my current stuff and see how it goes.  Thanks for all the great advice.  Rob.
Logged

Rob


Bourgeois JOM Cedar
Bourgeois Vintage OM
Bourgeois Vintage D
Gibson A4 Mandolin (1916)
LIMA621
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 2




Ignore
« Reply #29 on: June 14, 2005, 07:43:20 PM »

Hi people...I´m a Newbie here

I work as a professional Sound designer and I use a couple of Programs from the Magix company (www.Magix.com). The program Magix music Studio retails for about 50 - 100 Euros here in Europe ...I believe there is a feature limited Demo download on their site and an E version download (Cheapest Should be about $50 or so). This program handles up to 100 tracks and has  everything - professional quality FX rack, Virtual mixer and denoising/Dehissing. Pan, Volume, Dynamics and lots more. I`ve recorded several CD`s both for myself and commercially using this Software and it will burn you a Red Book master CD straight out of the programm. If you just want to record your larrivees then all it takes is a mouse click or two..if you want to get more complicated in the future then thats no problem either. The help is comprehensive, the program stable and the results are good.If you have a Multi input soundcard then you can record several tracks at once..on your Normal soundcard you can record the tracks one after another and mix them later on. If you`re practising a piece then you can do several takes and compare them On screen. I`ve attached a screenshot of the program for you to gander. If you want a sound sample, I have a 4 track guitar piece that I recorded in under 5 minutes with an L-01 and a L-03 earlier today. Shout and I`ll send it to you per mail..


My second larrivee arrived today...I`m in love with a guitar ....again!

www.bitten-by-the-blues.de
The tracks there were also recorded using the Software.



[attachment no longer available]
Logged
Fran Guidry
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 8




Ignore
« Reply #30 on: July 04, 2005, 04:20:11 AM »

Its not so much the computer noise - my laptop makes very little noise - its every little movement of my guitar on my lap, against my belly etc.,  chair squeaks and the like.  I appreciate the advise.  It is very helpful.  I need to keep this very simple.  I know a lot of you are into making really nice recordings and there may come a time when I get more into this.  At this point I don't have the time or inclination to build sound walls etc.  If need be I will just live with the extraneous noise.  But, if I could pick up a different mic for $100 or so and if it would make a substantial difference in the extraneous noise department, I would do it because it would involve very little time and no new money. 

You're facing a basic problem that (I don't believe) has much to do with the mic. Basically the guitar is a fairly quiet instrument - if you crank the gain enough to hear the guitar loud and clear, you'll hear chair squeaks, string squeaks, clothes and body parts rubbing the guitar, etc.

But ... 1. since your stated purpose is getting feedback on your playing ... so what? ... and 2. you'll get better at reducing noise while you play. Just like any other skill, you learn by doing. You can even oil the chair or switch to a stool.

The other issue, a bass heavy tone, is usually due to placing the (directional) mic too close to the source. The technology of directional mics is such that they (by laws of physics) exhibit proximity effect, a rising bass response as the mic gets close to the source. Proximity effect can begin as far as 24" and increases as you get closer. That's why a common recommendation is to place the mic 18" from the 12th fret, a fairly bright spot on the guitar.

You can try lots of other placements, however. 18" from the bridge might work well, or adjacent to your ear can be good.

Here's some bad news - you may be experiencing standing waves - in a small (normal human sized) room, the low frequencies bounce off the walls, ceiling, and floor and at some points in the room they reinforce, causing heavy bass. At other points they cancel, causing reduced bass. Moving the mic a few inches within the room can change the effect of standing waves.

Finally, the most important part of the recording is the part you have complete control over - the performance. As recording engineers we like clean, clear, sparkling recordings. Music listeners are much more interested in compelling music.

Fran
Logged
rpg51
Senior Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 671




Ignore
« Reply #31 on: July 04, 2005, 12:17:12 PM »

Interesting stuff.  I never realized there was this much to it.  Right now I'm trying to decide whether to convert the mic and input device I purchased into something more important to me - like another guitar maybe?
I need to focus my time on my playing, not futzing around with gear.  Simplify,  simplify.  I have a lot of complication and a lot of new things I am learning both in my music and otherwise, the ins and outs of how to make a good recording is not high on my list of priorities right now.  The day may come, but not now. 

I do appreciate all the input you folks have provided.  Thanks! 

Rob Gerety
Logged

Rob


Bourgeois JOM Cedar
Bourgeois Vintage OM
Bourgeois Vintage D
Gibson A4 Mandolin (1916)
mischultz
Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 96




Ignore
« Reply #32 on: September 07, 2005, 01:12:24 AM »

http://audacity.sourceforge.net/ 
I haven't used it, but I've heard good things. ITs an actual multi-track recording program.



I've used Audacity for a while for smaller stuff (three or four sources at most) and it's been bombproof. It's quite small and stable and offers a ton of functionality on a short learning curve. Worth a try.

Michael
Logged
Pages: 1 [2]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to: