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Author Topic: Best Parlour For Finger Pickin???  (Read 2453 times)
bsm
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« on: July 16, 2003, 02:26:11 AM »

Just looking for some feed back.  What in your opinion is the best wood combination for a Larrivee parlour?  Recognizing that tone can vary from one guitar to another, even the same make and model, I'm curious to hear about your favourite combo and the tones they may have.   My main acoustic is an older Washburn Jumbo that is very rich and full. :rolleyes:   I would like a deeper toned couch guitar, if that's possible.  I would not expect a parlour to have the tone or depth of a larger bodied acoustic, but am very drawn to these smaller guitars.   Any comments are welcome.

BSM
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Barefoot Rob
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« Reply #1 on: July 16, 2003, 03:21:00 AM »

This is a tuff one,I've got to think on this <_<  
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« Reply #2 on: July 17, 2003, 02:23:36 PM »

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This is a tuff one,I've got to think on this <_<
Well..... we are waiting??? :D  
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« Reply #3 on: July 17, 2003, 07:33:04 PM »

OK here goes...A friend of mine just got an all Koa,that for his style of finger pickin its great,I played it and thought it had a cool almost dobro thig going for it.We've had 2 maple bodies that made everyone drool,really good sounding and very loud.A customer of mine has a walnut and to him its the best sounding of them all.THe mahogany modal also sounds ok but to me the maple's have what I'd go with.
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« Reply #4 on: July 18, 2003, 04:55:43 AM »

I like clear bell tone for finger picking.   I guess it's gonna be try one till I find one!

BSM
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Griff
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« Reply #5 on: July 20, 2003, 09:10:07 PM »

I have to agree with unclrob on this one. There is just something about Koa that stands out. It has clarity right from E to E making it perfect for picking out individual notes.

But be warned...This is one instrument that needs to be broken in. When I first got mine it sounded rather enemic. After playing it a month or two it really opened up and is now my favorite instrument to grab when I am in a playing mood.

Griff
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Larrivée: LJ-10 Custom (Gryphon)
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« Reply #6 on: July 22, 2003, 01:32:03 AM »

I just bought a koa/spruce parlor from Buffalo Bros. a few weeks ago, and had the opportunity to play three that they had just got in. They all sounded great, but each a little different. Hard to quantify, but one just stood out to my ear. A quick change of strings to John Pearse PB lights made it sound a bit fuller. Adding ebony bridge pins a few days later took a bit of the harshness away. Now I am considering changing the Tusq nut and saddle to bone to further remove some of the edge.

Anyone else done any aftermarket changes to their parlor that they care to share?
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Koamon
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« Reply #7 on: August 02, 2003, 05:25:30 AM »

To me, it depends on your style of fingerpicking. The limitation on a parlor is that the tone compresses as you play harder...it's just the nature of the beast being a small body and all. I play an all body Koa and it just seems right for me. With a very light touch you can bring out some great nuances, however the greater your attack and harder you play, the body compresses the tone and hence you get a very woody dobro sound. Consequently, there is a tonal contrast from a spruce top which gets conflicting high-end overtones. But this is one guy's opinion...and you know what they say about those!  
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« Reply #8 on: August 06, 2003, 06:42:25 PM »

Quote
Anyone else done any aftermarket changes to their parlor that they care to share?
I would like to know also.  I am looking for a bone saddle to drop in.  Anyone know where to find it??

Ken <><
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« Reply #9 on: August 07, 2003, 03:03:22 AM »

UnclRob suggested a set of Tusq bridge pins, the black  ones with large abalone dots. They dress out the ebony bridge real nice and with a set of D'Adarrio J-16 it widens out the tone top and bottom to my ear. UnclRob says that a compensated bone saddle would cost a lot because you will have to have one custom made...why don't you try a Tusq or other synthetic material that is already compensated?    
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« Reply #10 on: August 08, 2003, 08:42:34 PM »

Mmmmmmmm Larrivee Koa. They are fantastic. Sweet, clear sounds. Excellent $$ value.
Russ
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Barefoot Rob
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« Reply #11 on: August 09, 2003, 12:25:34 AM »

There's a guy over at acoustic guitar forum wondering about an all mahogany parlour,has anyone had achance to see or play one.I know that the all mahogany L sounded wonderful,thoughts? <_<  
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Griff
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« Reply #12 on: August 09, 2003, 04:07:38 PM »

Quote
Anyone else done any aftermarket changes to their parlor that they care to share?
I bought a Larrivee Parlour Koa Special Edition (nicely flamed with an abalone rosette). I immediately took out the cheap plastic pins and replaced them with ebony/abalone pins. I also removed the ugly pickguard. The improvement in tone to my ears is spectacular with just these improvements.

I am about to have my luthier do a bone saddle replacement as well. He does a terrific job. The top surface is sculpted with flowing curves that do a far better job in compensating then the original Tusq saddles - and they are far prettier!

Another addition I am contemplating is a John Pearse Armrest (the small one). I have Armrests on all my other guitars and love them.

I hesitate to do a bone nut as well. I don't think there would be a marked improvement in tone that would justify the cost.

Griff
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Larrivée: LJ-10 Custom (Gryphon)
L-10-12 (Bell Tower)
Parlour Koa Special Edition (Sweet Baby)
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« Reply #13 on: August 10, 2003, 10:57:46 PM »

Griff-

I was thinking about removing the pickguard from my parlor as well, since I just use it for fingerstyle. Was is easy to remove? Any suggestions as to how to do it best? Thanks.
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Griff
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« Reply #14 on: August 11, 2003, 02:57:07 PM »

Removal of the ugly satin-finished pickguard is very easy. Just get a hairdryer and put it on medium. Concentrate the heat on one corner of the pickguard for just a few seconds and pry it up with your fingernail. Then just keep lifting it beneath the blast of warm air. Any stickum left behind can be removed with Goo Off or WD 40.

Just don't keep the hot air concentrated in one spot for more than a few seconds - keep it moving.

Good luck...

Griff
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Larrivée: LJ-10 Custom (Gryphon)
L-10-12 (Bell Tower)
Parlour Koa Special Edition (Sweet Baby)
Gibson: 1951 Southern Jumbo ('Tiger')
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