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Author Topic: Why are Larrivee Guitars not more popular?  (Read 1333 times)
mike in lytle
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« Reply #40 on: November 05, 2022, 01:21:20 AM »

Each guitar needs to be considered for its intended purpose and to dismiss a specific brand is demonstrating ignorance that limits one's artistic possibilities. 
Whoa. Heavy stuff.
Mike
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Silence Dogood
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« Reply #41 on: November 05, 2022, 12:47:23 PM »

I have a 24 year old D-03 that I purchased new for ~$500, if I recall.  I also have a 1 year old Martin 00-28, also purchased new (for a whole lot more).  Two very different instruments that reflect different styles and philosophies.  I value both for what they are and the different tone from each.  I decided that the Larrivee 00 was not what I wanted for my latest instrument and where I am in my musical life.  Each company is unique and makes quality instruments that will bring enjoyment for a lifetime.  We spend our dollars on what talks to us.  For some, marketing and what their favorite musician endorses is part of the equation.  Each company has their "stable" of musicians.  Doesnt make one better than the other IMO.  I do value that both are made here in North America and I am willing to pay for that "luxury."  My Larrivee has been fantastic over the years and have purchased other Larrivee's over the years.  Each guitar needs to be considered for its intended purpose and to dismiss a specific brand is demonstrating ignorance that limits one's artistic possibilities. 
Hello.  I noticed that was your first post, so welcome to this wonderful forum. 

Yes, I remember well the days of the $500 Larrivee D-03!  I got mine in 2003 for $599 (mine was slightly used - bought and returned within a couple weeks by someone who did that a lot from what I was told).  I remember back in the mid/late 90s going into Guitar Center and seeing those plain-jane Larrivees on the wall for $499.  They all sounded as good or better than anything else on the wall, which always blew my mind, because even then the other big brands were sometimes triple the price even then.  Those were the days when Larrivee came on my radar.  Around this same time I started seeing ads in the magazines for Larrivee.  I remember the guys from Barenaked Ladies in some of them.  Good times, and a whole different world it seems. 

I've never owned a Martin but I like them.  I took the tour in Naz, Penn. a few years ago, and after the tour they had several models on stands available to play.  There was some kind of OM body that was really great - sounded as good as anything I've ever played.  I also remember a certain D-18 in a local shop a few years ago that was one of the best guitars I've ever laid hands on.  My own guitar, my Larrivee, isn't the best guitar out there, nor is it the best guitar I've ever played, but it's my guitar and that means everything to me. 
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ducktrapper
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« Reply #42 on: November 06, 2022, 10:26:47 PM »

Well, my point is being ignored but in my experience very few Americans can correctly pronounce the name of these guitars. And that does not apply to any of the other popular brands. Favre!
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Silence Dogood
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« Reply #43 on: November 23, 2022, 01:27:36 PM »

Well, my point is being ignored but in my experience very few Americans can correctly pronounce the name of these guitars. And that does not apply to any of the other popular brands. Favre!
I agree that most Americans cannot pronounce the name, so there is a built-in intimidation factor there.  And l think I've said this in this thread, some (maybe many?) Americans, at least in the part of the country I'm from, still have a type of suspicion of foreign things.  As an example, my own father would never eat at an Italian restaurant. 
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