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Author Topic: Sometimes I really want a 12-string...  (Read 233 times)
Silence Dogood
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« Reply #20 on: October 14, 2020, 01:13:16 AM »

So what is it exactly you think you want to do on a 12 string?
Cause you are going to be unhappy with it if it just lies around not played and then you pick it up and expect satisfaction.
Mike
Certain songs seems to call for one.  Plus I just love the way they sound.  And feel. And look. 
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mike in lytle
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« Reply #21 on: October 14, 2020, 02:04:40 AM »

So what is it exactly you think you want to do on a 12 string?
Certain songs seems to call for one.  Plus I just love the way they sound.  And feel. And look.  
You did not answer my question. Sound, feel and looks don't count.
You seemed to say you would play "certain songs"? That is what you would do with a 12 string?
Mike
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Barefoot Rob
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« Reply #22 on: October 14, 2020, 03:52:37 AM »

One of the tune's that I play with Gee is done on 2 12 strings 18 by Alice Cooper.At a ScuFi show he meant Mr Cooper and told him about it and he loved it an ask Gene would mind if he did with a 12 string...Gene told him its his tune.

The Seagul I had was a very nice sounding 12er just didn't feel right in my hands.It was under used $275.
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Silence Dogood
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« Reply #23 on: October 14, 2020, 02:54:32 PM »

You did not answer my question. Sound, feel and looks don't count.
You seemed to say you would play "certain songs"? That is what you would do with a 12 string?
Mike
Yeah, a 12 for certain songs is pretty much my answer.  I think they sound great in certain settings.
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mike in lytle
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« Reply #24 on: October 14, 2020, 03:42:42 PM »

Yeah, a 12 for certain songs is pretty much my answer.  I think they sound great in certain settings.
It may be helpful to explore the tunes you like and experiment with the chords with strumming, cross picking or flatpicking or whatever, and come up with a few pieces of your own. Rob has already mentioned open D and open G tunings. I have a 12 in drop D and one 12 in open G, and I play those guitars often. Playing it daily or several times a week will do wonders cause your left hand will become stronger, your callouses will be tougher, the guitar will not fall asleep, and you will have material to stay enthusiastic about. Of course there are standard songs in 12 string you can learn, but there is also a nice feeling that comes from knowing "I made this one up myself".
Mike
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Silence Dogood
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« Reply #25 on: October 14, 2020, 04:56:42 PM »

It may be helpful to explore the tunes you like and experiment with the chords with strumming, cross picking or flatpicking or whatever, and come up with a few pieces of your own. Rob has already mentioned open D and open G tunings. I have a 12 in drop D and one 12 in open G, and I play those guitars often. Playing it daily or several times a week will do wonders cause your left hand will become stronger, your callouses will be tougher, the guitar will not fall asleep, and you will have material to stay enthusiastic about. Of course there are standard songs in 12 string you can learn, but there is also a nice feeling that comes from knowing "I made this one up myself".
Mike
All excellent ideas.   About half of what I know how to play is stuff that I made up.  I really enjoy doing that.   I have two acoustics and keep one in standard tuning and the other (my Larrivee) tuned down a whole step.  I also drop D (to C in that case) quite a bit.   Iíve never really explored open tunings.   Something to think about for sure.   
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mike in lytle
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« Reply #26 on: October 14, 2020, 06:16:29 PM »

All excellent ideas.   About half of what I know how to play is stuff that I made up.  I really enjoy doing that.   I have two acoustics and keep one in standard tuning and the other (my Larrivee) tuned down a whole step.  I also drop D (to C in that case) quite a bit.   Iíve never really explored open tunings.   Something to think about for sure.   
Cool. You can also drop the G string to F# in drop D tuning. It opens up some interesting variations to drop D.
Open G for guitar is similar to 5 string bluegrass banjo tuning. It is a very cool tuning, and many chord shapes are pretty easy.
Open G tuning becomes very, very cool when the 12 string is tuned down 1-1/2 steps, which puts you into the key of E. Playing along with someone (or recording yourself) who is playing key of E on 6 string makes a sweet guitar combination, mostly cause of the lower registers on the 12 string.
Mike
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ducktrapper
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« Reply #27 on: October 14, 2020, 06:55:51 PM »

I agree with the spirit of your post, and for the record I love cheap guitars and by nature tend to root for the underdog (one of the reasons I chose Larrivee).  But I still have never heard a cheap 12-string that didnít sound thin and, well, cheap.  Lots of jangle but no bottom end or character   If I ever ran across a cheap one that sounded good, Iíd be happy to be proven wrong.  

It's not the price, it's the materials and workmanship. Who knows I've only played the one and maybe I got lucky but when I bought my Washburn D10S12 at a GC in Appleton, they also had a used Taylor 12 string for about $1200.00 more. Playing both and considering my needs, I actually preferred the Washburn. Sold woods, nice workmanship, nice tuners. All I had to do is put new strings on it. I find 12 strings generally tend to be jangly and not bottomly, if that makes sense. It's the doubled plain strings. The jangle is what makes them what they are, isn't it? I agree however, play a bunch and only buy one you like. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7h2yeG6Yl0E  
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Silence Dogood
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« Reply #28 on: October 15, 2020, 12:15:34 AM »

It's not the price, it's the materials and workmanship. Who knows I've only played the one and maybe I got lucky but when I bought my Washburn D10S12 at a GC in Appleton, they also had a used Taylor 12 string for about $1200.00 more. Playing both and considering my needs, I actually preferred the Washburn. Sold woods, nice workmanship, nice tuners. All I had to do is put new strings on it. I find 12 strings generally tend to be jangly and not bottomly, if that makes sense. It's the doubled plain strings. The jangle is what makes them what they are, isn't it? I agree however, play a bunch and only buy one you like.  

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7h2yeG6Yl0E  
I would love to find a GOOD less expensive 12 and would prob buy one if I did.   Iíve always loved the Taylor 12s since I was a teen (about 30 years ago now). They must not be very popular because Iíve seen several 355 12s for way less than $1k.  
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ducktrapper
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« Reply #29 on: October 15, 2020, 02:05:32 PM »

I would love to find a GOOD less expensive 12 and would prob buy one if I did.   Iíve always loved the Taylor 12s since I was a teen (about 30 years ago now). They must not be very popular because Iíve seen several 355 12s for way less than $1k.  

Good luck. I've found the thing with the less expensive guitars is often a lack of consistency. Sometimes you find one that really stands out from the herd, however.   
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Silence Dogood
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« Reply #30 on: October 22, 2020, 02:08:56 AM »

Ok, so while not necessarily "cheap" (the shop was asking $550), today I ran across an older Yamaha 12-string.  I know about the red labels and this was not one of them.  It had a yellowed label that was probably once off-white.  It had a wider headstock with a bird on it, where today it has a "Y" there.  The label had "Made in China" and the shop owner told me it was made in 1976.  I admit I don't know a lot about Yamahas, but I didn't think they made guitars in China that far back.  I thought back then they were either Japan or Taiwan?  Maybe I'm wrong.  

At any rate, this guitar was a BEAST and I came close to leaving with it.  But it was pretty ugly.  I did a image search online for this particular model and could not locate one.  It really did sound great.  The price seemed a bit high to me for a China-made guitar too.  If it was a Japanese one, I might feel differntly.  

Bottom line, though, this was a seriously nice sounding and playing guitar for not a lot of money.  I was impressed!
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ducktrapper
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« Reply #31 on: October 22, 2020, 02:23:49 PM »

I've had nothing but good luck with Yamahas regardless of where they were built. I've owned a half dozen of them over the years and I currently own three including a "Red Tag" FG-180, an NTX900FM nylon crossover and a Pacifica electric 12 string all of which I like very much. 
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bobsnuscruz
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« Reply #32 on: October 23, 2020, 03:43:49 AM »

Have one. No, but had three.  A Korean guitar from a pawn shop (my 1st guitar, what a nightmare), a Noname from Japan (OK) and a Taylor 555 (very nice.) 
Played often: yes, daily for a few songs.
Worth it.  You bet.  (Especially good if you are playing fills for a singer with a baritone voice. )

There are 20 Taylor 355s on Reverb right now.
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« Reply #33 on: October 23, 2020, 10:54:01 AM »

 In 1977,I bought an Ovation 12 string Pacemaker and sold it 12 years later because I never bonded with the neck and the plastic back never changed the sound in 12 years.

In 2005, I ordered a custom 12 string Larrivee (LV03MT). The custom aspects of this guitar include a mahogany top which provides a full sound and softens the jangle often associated with 12 strings and the cutaway, bone nut and saddle. I pulled this guitar out last night and itís really matured nicely.

As a general rule of thumb, I do think you need to spend a little more on a 12 string. Most of them tend to feel overbuilt because they have to be able to handle the strings. The necks and intonation can also be tricky. Larrivee solved and eliminated all those problems with my guitar for $1,000 out the door.
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