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Author Topic: Crazing or wood figure?  (Read 192 times)
Deliberate1
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« on: March 14, 2019, 04:52:43 PM »

Friends, I have been thoroughly enjoying my new to me 00040RE custom. I am new to guitar (though not to music) and have been thrilled with the lovely sounds these virgin fingers can coax from that lovely box. I was generally aware of the issue of finish crazing when I bought the guitar. Since it was coming from Florida to Maine, it seemed to be something I should give some thought to. And I did, to a certain extent. When the box arrived, I let it set closed for an hour or so. And then I took the case out of the box and let it sit, again, for an hour. When I took it out, I did not see anything that looked like the images of crazing that I have seen on the web. But  on very close inspection on the Moon spruce top, there is an appearance that could be that, or, I am thinking (and hoping) more likely just the wood pattern highlights. Specifically, there is the vertical grain of the wood. But there is, over the entire top, a constant pattern-like repetition of parallel faint lines that run at right angles to the grain. They are fairly uniform and very faint. There is no dimension to them - that is to say, the top feels perfectly smooth. There is nothing on the rosewood sides or back that reproduces those lines. So, I am wondering if what I am seeing is just a lovely dimensional figuring, like fiddle-back, or whether these lines represent a temp-induced flaw in the finish.
To be sure, it does not much matter to me. The guitar is as sweet as can be.
Many thanks,
David
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jgillard
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« Reply #1 on: March 14, 2019, 05:01:18 PM »

What you are describing are Medullary rays. (Also known as silking)
These are generally a sign of a high quality quartersawn top.

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Medullary ray is a cellular structure found in woods. In this context the term refers to radial sheets or ribbons extending vertically through the tree across and perpendicular to the growth rings. Also called pith rays or wood rays, these formations of primarily parenchyma cells allow the radial transport of sap and are essential in the process of tylosis. In quartersawn material, where the wood is cut into boards with the growth rings roughly perpendicular to the face of the board, the medullary rays often produce beautiful figure such as silver grain, medullary spots, pith flecks, etc

I hope this helps.
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Deliberate1
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« Reply #2 on: March 14, 2019, 05:08:35 PM »

What you are describing are Medullary rays. (Also known as silking)
These are generally a sign of a high quality quartersawn top.

I hope this helps.

Indeed, it does. Very much obliged.
David
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headsup
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« Reply #3 on: March 14, 2019, 06:43:53 PM »

I'm inclined to agree with the above comment, but also, I don't believe guitar companies, specifically Larrivee are using a product that causes "crazing" anymore.
I believe the new lacquers don't do that, due they're composition etc.
I could be wrong, but I haven't seen a guitar built in the last decade or daw that has suffered the symptom.
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Deliberate1
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« Reply #4 on: March 14, 2019, 07:22:54 PM »

I'm inclined to agree with the above comment, but also, I don't believe guitar companies, specifically Larrivee are using a product that causes "crazing" anymore.
I believe the new lacquers don't do that, due they're composition etc.
I could be wrong, but I haven't seen a guitar built in the last decade or daw that has suffered the symptom.

I was wondering that as well. the images I saw with this phenomenon seemed to be on the glossy end of the spectrum, the opposite of the lovely soft Larrivee finish.
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B0WIE
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« Reply #5 on: March 15, 2019, 12:51:31 AM »

If your crazing is similar to to the image below, it's "silking"/medular rays which indicate a quality cut. Regarding finishes that check, that's much more a nitro finish issue. Larrivees do often get finish issues around the binding, but I've never seen one with broad finish checking because Larrivee doesn't use nitro.
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Deliberate1
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« Reply #6 on: March 15, 2019, 04:37:04 PM »

If your crazing is similar to to the image below, it's "silking"/medular rays which indicate a quality cut. Regarding finishes that check, that's much more a nitro finish issue. Larrivees do often get finish issues around the binding, but I've never seen one with broad finish checking because Larrivee doesn't use nitro.


Bowie,
That is exactly what I am seeing. What a lovely piece of wood that Moonwood spruce is.
Thanks for going to the trouble of taking and posting the picture.
Regards,
David
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mattwood
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« Reply #7 on: March 16, 2019, 12:50:54 PM »

The moonwood top on my L-03Zw is very unique in that it has several areas that are 3D in nature which is referred to as chatoyance.  When you turn it certain ways in light, some of the areas will then look raised like a ridge and other areas will look sunken like they are a trough.  It is very unique and adds an interesting visual character to a guitar that has a lot of tonal characteristics.
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