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headsup
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« on: October 15, 2018, 04:50:12 PM »

good read, new builders pushing the envelope and challenging status quo....

https://reverb.com/news/6-young-luthiers-you-should-know
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B0WIE
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« Reply #1 on: October 15, 2018, 10:56:07 PM »

I would like to try some of them, but would never buy them online. Reason being, I so often see innovative designs drastically reduced or kicking around classified sections for months on end. Seems most acoustic players don't want new, they want familiar, and anything "different" takes a beating in resale.

Maybe trends will change as the playerbase changes. I do like the idea of innovation in acoustics and I'm glad reverb is giving those luthiers a spotlight.
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« Reply #2 on: October 15, 2018, 11:40:28 PM »

Interesting but being old and more then often in the way not my cup of coffee.I'm sure some of the newer players will enjoy them.
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Blind Dog
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« Reply #3 on: November 05, 2018, 03:20:37 PM »

Interesting but being old and more then often in the way not my cup of coffee.I'm sure some of the newer players will enjoy them.


Princess Wiggles review: I would enjoy them even more if they put the bevel on the right bout!



While my Larrivee OM03 is my guitar 'everything', with its Larrivee/Ted Thompson heritage, the Kronbauer TDK 285 koa Custom is pretty groovy/crazy dope.

(Like an old double barrel, I now have two Triggers.)

I think bevels are an innovation that are here to stay. Keeps my old shoulders comfy, even with the bigger mini jumbo body.

NGDs keep me spry.

Jean should be so proud of the all young luthiers he's influenced. What an amazing legacy of craftsmanship & tone.  

And thanks for the Reverb article headsup.  

 
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ducktrapper
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« Reply #4 on: November 05, 2018, 04:54:30 PM »

A couple of nice looking guitars and several butt ugly ones. Misshapes, bells and whistles do not often replace tried and true. There's a reason why Martin still outsells them all. The best new luthiers stick with what works well. Remember Garrison? Didn't think so. 
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Blind Dog
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« Reply #5 on: November 05, 2018, 06:45:27 PM »

... There's a reason why Martin still outsells them all.

 bowdown They're just like MacDonalds?

And jmo, but as I remember Garrison, they were not on the same level as the custom, luthier builds.

 



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« Reply #6 on: November 05, 2018, 07:59:33 PM »

bowdown They're just like MacDonalds?

And jmo, but as I remember Garrison, they were not on the same level as the custom, luthier builds.

 





You may have missed my point about Garrison. And if you actually think a good Martin is anything like a Big Mac you may have missed a lot more than that.   
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rockstar_not
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« Reply #7 on: November 08, 2018, 04:21:57 AM »

Garrison were decent sounding but weighed like a Les Paul😬. Pretty innovative design but I think it was Gibson that bought them and promptly killed them off.
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« Reply #8 on: November 08, 2018, 02:29:31 PM »

Garrison were decent sounding but weighed like a Les Paul😬. Pretty innovative design but I think it was Gibson that bought them and promptly killed them off.

Got to play three. Two sounded like crap. The most expensive one sounded alright but, like you say, weighed a ton. I doubt that Gibson bought them to kill them off. Except as hype, they just weren't that good an idea and no one wanted one. Again, there's generally a good reason why tried and true is tried and  true.   
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Blind Dog
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« Reply #9 on: November 09, 2018, 02:39:19 PM »

You may have missed my point about Garrison. And if you actually think a good Martin is anything like a Big Mac you may have missed a lot more than that.  

I'm not generally impressed with numbers, and you seem to assume negatively 'a lot' about myself, and others. I do remember Garrison. I thought your point was something like; you prefer traditional sensibilities, and think prudent builder's would do well to follow in Martin's footsteps, or continue at their peril.

I've owned many Martins, enjoyed them all, and not a bad word to say. Never had one word to say about Big Mac's. That's only on you.

To be clear: nothing against Martin, but I don't understand why Martin's numbers (like MacDonald's), are noteworthy when considering small luthiers. I'm so weary of Martin best/Martin sucks train wrecks.

Speculating about a lot more I may have missed?

Imo you're just baiting me.  

Sorry, better things to do.  

amf  
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ducktrapper
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« Reply #10 on: November 09, 2018, 03:23:25 PM »

I'm not generally impressed with numbers, and you seem to assume negatively 'a lot' about myself, and others. I do remember Garrison. I thought your point was something like; you prefer traditional sensibilities, and think prudent builder's would do well to follow in Martin's footsteps, or continue at their peril.

I've owned many Martins, enjoyed them all, and not a bad word to say. Never had one word to say about Big Mac's. That's only on you.

To be clear: nothing against Martin, but I don't understand why Martin's numbers (like MacDonald's), are noteworthy when considering small luthiers. I'm so weary of Martin best/Martin sucks train wrecks.

Speculating about a lot more I may have missed?

Imo you're just baiting me.  

Sorry, better things to do.  

amf  

Now who's on the assumption train? I didn't bring up McDonalds. No pun intended. Have a nice day.
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headsup
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« Reply #11 on: November 11, 2018, 04:41:40 PM »

Well how Martin became big Mac, or how a small Newfoundland company ( Garrison- with Canadian federal and provincial funding) got to try to build mediocre guitars- after their fishing industry went under- is ancient history.

Regardless....
once upon a time, myself and several other young players in the Toronto & Montreal cities were all playing Martin Guitars.
 mine was a 1957 D-28, When a new upstart came through Montreal, (1971/72) we were impressed.
 several of us placed our orders with Jean.

We sold our old Martins and went with this new adventurous builder.

It's common knowledge the apprentice legacy- Linda Manzer, Grit Laskin, David Wren Tony Duggan-Smith all brilliant builders, set new standards, opened new guitar building ground, just as Jean did.

My OP was about yet another breed of innovative builders, that's all.

Judgement  not required.  
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ducktrapper
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« Reply #12 on: November 11, 2018, 06:03:59 PM »

Well how Martin became big Mac, or how a small Newfoundland company ( Garrison- with Canadian federal and provincial funding) got to try to build mediocre guitars- after their fishing industry went under- is ancient history.

Regardless....
once upon a time, myself and several other young players in the Toronto & Montreal cities were all playing Martin Guitars.
 mine was a 1957 D-28, When a new upstart came through Montreal, (1971/72) we were impressed.
 several of us placed our orders with Jean.

We sold our old Martins and went with this new adventurous builder.

It's common knowledge the apprentice legacy- Linda Manzer, Grit Laskin, David Wren Tony Duggan-Smith all brilliant builders, set new standards, opened new guitar building ground, just as Jean did.

My OP was about yet another breed of innovative builders, that's all.

Judgement  not required.  

Sure and Jean used tried and true methods to build great guitars. His innovations weren't that outlandish. First of all study under a master. Learn how to build a fine classical guitar. Take a classical guitar, keep the shape, make it and larger and brace it for steel strings. Still using dove tailed necks and, notwithstanding his foray into pointy electric models, his guitars look fairly standard. What's great is the results. I suppose there'll always be a market for outlandish looking things but, like I said, there's generally a good reason why standards are standards. 
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