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Author Topic: Free Hand Knife Sharpening  (Read 415 times)
JOYCEfromNS
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« on: October 06, 2017, 06:43:36 PM »

I have been spoiled as have a good friend who was retired from a well known local knife manufacturer who sharpened my knives etc but he is now moving a distance that makes this continued relationship impractical.

So I am now considering doing my own. Have a lot  fun finding quality knifes at yard sales and flea markets; "cleaning" them up and gifting them out.

Need to purchase some whet stones wondering what you here who do your own use.

I am considering a Sigma Power set from a Cdn retailer Lee Valley (luv that store way too much).

What do you do  
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« Reply #1 on: October 06, 2017, 07:18:09 PM »

I have for many years use use a whet stone if I needed to create a new edge I use a grinding wheel first then whet stone it.Oh ya I don't use oil just a tad bit of water.
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« Reply #2 on: October 06, 2017, 07:20:33 PM »

I would like to find an Arkansas whet wheel. I made that up. Like a grinder but a much finer grit that rotates slower and wet. Perhaps a stone polishing wheel of diamond. Like what a lapidary uses for cabachons. I just use a cheap whet stone and a diamond stone for harder steel.
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« Reply #3 on: October 06, 2017, 07:44:37 PM »

At my local market the butcher will put an edge on  up to three kitchen knives for free if you are a regular customer.   
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« Reply #4 on: October 07, 2017, 06:09:31 AM »

Hi Andrew,

Since I work at Lee Valley and advise customers on sharpening, I am very familiar with the Sigma water stones.  I can highly recommend them for your application (knives).  I would normally recommend just the 1000X and 3000X if all you are sharpening is knives that are in your kitchen, hunting kit, etc.  In your case, I presume you come across some pretty beat-up knives that need restoring.  I would recommend you add the 240X to the 1000 and 3000.  You can get rid of serious nicks much easier with the coarse stone.  Then follow up with the 1000X to sharpen the main bevel.  The 3000X is used to hone the blade to ultimate sharpness.  You don't need a super fine stone for knives.  Those stones are only relevant when sharpening chisels and plane blades.

If you haven't used water stones before, there are lots of good videos out there describing the actual motions of the knife over the stone, etc.
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« Reply #5 on: October 07, 2017, 11:32:53 AM »

Not your normal thread for a guitar site, but one which I find interesting! As a long time woodcarver, woodworker, hunter and fisherman, having sharp tools is to me an absolute necessity. Having grown up with the bare bones basics in sharpening technology, that being a few good whet stones and a fine wheel grinder, I tend to still keep things simple and with excellent results. But holy cow, there are some amazing sharpening rigs out there these days that beg attention. I also belong to an artist cooperative in our little town, and we are blessed with an unbelievable facility full of tools and space and camaraderie. A conversation started a few months ago about acquiring a state-of-the-art sharpening system for the growing number of up and coming woodcarvers. This old dog is open to some potential new tricks. There's just something special about the feeling of quality sharp steel gliding thru wood or food.     
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JOYCEfromNS
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« Reply #6 on: October 07, 2017, 11:44:03 AM »

Hi Andrew,

Since I work at Lee Valley and advise customers on sharpening, I am very familiar with the Sigma water stones. 
Thanks Kurt much appreciate your suggestion as was hiccupping over the the grits to get. Will follow your suggestion of 240, 1000 and 3000
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« Reply #7 on: October 07, 2017, 12:25:22 PM »

Not your normal thread for a guitar site, but one which I find interesting!  I also belong to an artist cooperative in our little town, and we are blessed with an unbelievable facility full of tools and space and camaraderie. A conversation started a few months ago about acquiring a state-of-the-art sharpening system for the growing number of up and coming woodcarvers. This old dog is open to some potential new tricks. There's just something special about the feeling of quality sharp steel gliding thru wood or food.     
Normal around here 

Rich the co-op experience seems special on many levels.

I am aware of some of the systems out there thru on-line experience only - got a bit over-whelmed in my research. Free-hand for me in my circumstance seemed like a skill that I could learn and is somewhat simplistic/basic. I find "gadgets" somewhat limited. In your conversations was there one system that stood out from the others?
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« Reply #8 on: October 07, 2017, 08:46:10 PM »

 In your conversations was there one system that stood out from the others?
[/quote]
Not yet, but that's coming after some research. I'll post when the time comes.
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« Reply #9 on: October 08, 2017, 01:10:53 PM »

Several friends of mine have "The Wicked Edge" system and it will get your knives "scary sharp."

Chas
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« Reply #10 on: October 14, 2017, 01:09:30 AM »

The Spyderco Tri-Angle Sharpmaker set, along with adding their coarse diamond and their ultra-fine honing rods allows anyone with any hand tool experience to get hair popping edges with very little in the way of a learning curve. I finish off my edges on a couple of homemade strops. 
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« Reply #11 on: October 14, 2017, 05:38:46 AM »

Sharpening can be as complex or simple as you make it.  There are many methods, techniques, tools, and abrasives that will all accomplish the desired result (a keen edge).  For anyone who is interested in delving further, Lee Valley Tools has an excellent collection of on-line articles about sharpening.  Here is a link http://www.leevalley.com/en/home/Articles.aspx?p=32&cat=32%2c47182
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"Badges?  We don't need no stinkin' badges."

Became a Shooting Star when I got my 1st guitar.
Back in '66, I was 13 and that was my fix.
Still shooting for stardom after all this time.
If I never make it, I'll still be fine.


 
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