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Author Topic: Larrivee better than ever  (Read 1385 times)
broKen
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« on: August 27, 2017, 07:46:48 PM »

So says JCL. So as I've been messing around with my new ooo-40, I  thought to offer one or two of those improvements. The obvious one is of course the scalloped bracing. Another I noticed while replacing the saddle is the saddle slot was routed  ever so slightly angled so the saddle leans toward the pins to counter the pressure of the strings pushing the saddle toward the sound hole. Also the string ramps cut into the bridge, although I did have to widen the E string ramp slightly.
I'm sure there are more that are not obvious to my untrained eye or ear.
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George
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« Reply #1 on: August 27, 2017, 10:00:22 PM »

All of my Larrivee's range from 2008-2016 manufacture years so my best guess is that most, if not all, were built with the "better" refinements that JCL refers to (whatever they consist of).  I cannot say anything negative about any of the many that I own and/or have owned, IMHO they are consistently the finest solid wood guitars you can buy for the price...  I am interested in knowing what refinement details collectively make them better though...
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George
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« Reply #2 on: August 28, 2017, 12:32:31 AM »

I've owned Larrivees made between 97 and 2014 and I can't say one production period is necessarily better than the other.  Definitely more glue slop and other cosmetic issues in the newer ones. But, some things like binding seem more meticulously done on the newer ones, maybe due to better machinery, maybe not.

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D-02-12
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rosborn
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« Reply #3 on: August 28, 2017, 02:13:41 AM »

I've owned Larrivees made between 97 and 2014 and I can't say one production period is necessarily better than the other.  Definitely more glue slop and other cosmetic issues in the newer ones. But, some things like binding seem more meticulously done on the newer ones, maybe due to better machinery, maybe not.

Good thing I never look inside my guitars to gauge the precision of the glue application!
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B0WIE
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« Reply #4 on: August 28, 2017, 02:22:34 AM »

Good thing I never look inside my guitars to gauge the precision of the glue application!
You don't have to go looking for it.  I've had 3 Larrivees where big globs of dried glue were visible during string changes (in fact, one was visible while playing), one where buffing compound was in nooks and crannies all over the surface, one where there was some dings in the headstock (under the finish, on a new guitar), another where the bridge was not glued properly.  I'm not bashing Larrivee, I love their guitars, I'm just saying it's not the minutia you're trying to play it off as.


Back to the subject; I just remembered two things that are definitely improvements in Larrivee production; wood binding and bone nut and saddles!  Bravo to them for making those two improvements.
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D-02-12
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rosborn
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« Reply #5 on: August 28, 2017, 02:32:40 AM »

You don't have to go looking for it.  I've had 3 Larrivees where big globs of dried glue were visible during string changes (in fact, one was visible while playing), one where buffing compound was in nooks and crannies all over the surface, one where there was some dings in the headstock (under the finish, on a new guitar), another where the bridge was not glued properly.  I'm not bashing Larrivee, I love their guitars, I'm just saying it's not the minutia you're trying to play it off as.


Back to the subject; I just remembered two things that are definitely improvements in Larrivee production; wood binding and bone nut and saddles!  Bravo to them for making those two improvements.

I'm playing anything off as minutia. I participate on forums for fun...as a release from many long hours at work. I'm glad you found a few positive thins to mention about Larrivee. That's encouraging!


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JOYCEfromNS
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« Reply #6 on: August 28, 2017, 02:55:27 AM »

You don't have to go looking for it.  I've had 3 Larrivees where big globs of dried glue were visible during string changes (in fact, one was visible while playing), one where buffing compound was in nooks and crannies all over the surface, one where there was some dings in the headstock (under the finish, on a new guitar), another where the bridge was not glued properly.  I'm not bashing Larrivee, I love their guitars, I'm just saying it's not the minutia you're trying to play it off as.

Having a few more than 3 I don't have this issue(s)  Out of curiosity are all  your models the 3 series?
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B0WIE
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« Reply #7 on: August 28, 2017, 10:18:16 AM »

Having a few more than 3 I don't have this issue(s)  Out of curiosity are all  your models the 3 series?
Unfortunately, no. I've seen worse build issues in higher end models (50, 60, 70) than in the 03s I've had. The cleanest Larrivee I've owned was an 03. Two others did have some obvious glue slop though.

I do my own repair work and have done a lot of finish work so I'll admit that my eye picks up things people would normally overlook. I commonly find little blemishes in high end guitars as well. Regarding the topic, I don't get the impression that they're they're necessarily better than ever now. But, they've implemented a few cool things and it's safe to say that the overall quality hasn't changed much over the years. Great guitars then. Great guitars now.
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D-02-12
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Walkerman
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« Reply #8 on: August 31, 2017, 03:24:55 PM »

You don't have to go looking for it.  I've had 3 Larrivees where big globs of dried glue were visible during string changes (in fact, one was visible while playing), one where buffing compound was in nooks and crannies all over the surface, one where there was some dings in the headstock (under the finish, on a new guitar), another where the bridge was not glued properly.  I'm not bashing Larrivee, I love their guitars, I'm just saying it's not the minutia you're trying to play it off as.


Back to the subject; I just remembered two things that are definitely improvements in Larrivee production; wood binding and bone nut and saddles!  Bravo to them for making those two improvements.

You seem to have issues not experienced by the vast majority of Larrivee owners.  One example .... during the fitting/gluing processes, Larrivee folks use UV lights to locate and remove excess glue.  I have seen the care they take on such matters.  I even asked one guy why he was going to so much trouble, since no one would see any of that stuff on the  inside.   He simply replied "I would know it was there."
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B0WIE
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« Reply #9 on: August 31, 2017, 04:19:36 PM »

You seem to have issues not experienced by the vast majority of Larrivee owners.  One example .... during the fitting/gluing processes, Larrivee folks use UV lights to locate and remove excess glue.  I have seen the care they take on such matters.  I even asked one guy why he was going to so much trouble, since no one would see any of that stuff on the  inside.   He simply replied "I would know it was there."
I've seen numerous people online speak of issues like mine. I've also seen you write them off before because you're very into this #1 fan role, or whatever it is you're doing.  I recommend Larrivee's all the time because I think they represent the best value in quality guitars.  I also believe in giving honest feedback so that they know where they can improve. The bridge glue issue was on one of the newer models, one of the most expensive in their catalog, and it was a pretty bad screw up.
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D-02-12
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« Reply #10 on: August 31, 2017, 04:31:42 PM »

I've seen numerous people online speak of issues like mine. I've also seen you write them off before because you're very into this #1 fan role, or whatever it is you're doing.  I recommend Larrivee's all the time because I think they represent the best value in quality guitars.  I also believe in giving honest feedback so that they know where they can improve. The bridge glue issue was on one of the newer models, one of the most expensive in their catalog, and it was a pretty bad screw up.

Not at all.  I have just never had the issues you describe.  That's all.  When someone talks about extremely sloppy things, as you do, I think it is fair to describe my experiences.  You do believe in both sides of an issue being presented on a public forum, don't you?  Seriously, "huge globs of glue, buffing compound in every nook and cranny, bridge not glued properly, dings in the headstock" ..... that sounds like an entirely inferior guitar maker.  You also make it sound as if it is so very common to have these issues.  Once again, not my experience at all, and I have owned enough Larrivees that if it was as common as you intimate, I would have seen lots of examples.
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« Reply #11 on: August 31, 2017, 05:28:10 PM »

Not at all.  I have just never had the issues you describe.  That's all.  When someone talks about extremely sloppy things, as you do, I think it is fair to describe my experiences.  You do believe in both sides of an issue being presented on a public forum, don't you?  Seriously, "huge globs of glue, buffing compound in every nook and cranny, bridge not glued properly, dings in the headstock" ..... that sounds like an entirely inferior guitar maker.  You also make it sound as if it is so very common to have these issues.  Once again, not my experience at all, and I have owned enough Larrivees that if it was as common as you intimate, I would have seen lots of examples.
If Rob, Joyce, Tuffy, Ken, Duck, etc said that to me, fair enough.  But, when you establish a history of consistently dismissing everyone who has any type of criticism, and name-drop at every opportunity, I don't regard your opinion as being part of "both sides".  It's definitely 1 side and always 1 side.  I'm not trying to be rude, but I do want to be frank about it since you do this all the time.  When people come here flaming Larrivee based on 1 issue, I am one of the first to defend the company.  But, I've noticed any time I, or someone else, is honest about smaller issues, you're right there to shut it down.

Anyhow, I've said my part and don't care to belabor this any longer so I'll give you the last word.
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D-02-12
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Zohn
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« Reply #12 on: September 01, 2017, 09:36:33 AM »

I have to agree better than ever - the ramps in the bridge is a welcome addition and the neck angles seem to be spot-on, at least on the 03 and 40 series now available again in South Africa.
Another feature worth mentioning is the universal end-pin which is fitted into a pre-drilled hole,  which is sized for a drop-in fitment of the electronics-end-pin - no drilling required!.
One aspect that I find somewhat lacking on the 40-series, is the saddle blank fit, which isn't as tight as it should be - that could be a batch issue though.

I said it before, the 40-series guitars are magic and likely to become Larrivee's top seller (if it not already is the case).
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George
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« Reply #13 on: September 01, 2017, 01:55:21 PM »


I said it before, the 40-series guitars are magic and likely to become Larrivee's top seller (if it not already is the case).

This is an interesting comment and I would be very interested in seeing the statistics trend since the introduction of the 40 series.  I have three of them, and many more with the standard bracing.  I love them all, but sometimes I find myself picking up a 40 first...
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George
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« Reply #14 on: September 01, 2017, 02:40:09 PM »

This is an interesting comment and I would be very interested in seeing the statistics trend since the introduction of the 40 series.  I have three of them, and many more with the standard bracing.  I love them all, but sometimes I find myself picking up a 40 first...

I would to see some statistic on that claim too but I am inclined to believe it. From my experience...I previously owned a D-03 and a L-03. I purchased them after reading what great guitars Larrivee makes. They were very nice guitars but just didn't do much for me. It may have been that, for me, they were too balanced across the strings - kind of more like a Taylor than a Martin. I sold them off and bought a Martin 000-18. I really loved that Martin but got an offer from a friend of a friend who is in Tim McGraw's band that I couldn't refuse. That was August 2016.  I had no guitars until late December 2016, when I decided to take a shot on a OOO-40 and, boy, am I glad I did. That guitar really changed my opinion of Larrivee because it is more Martin-like in tone. I wasn't and am not looking for a Martin or a Martin clone but I do like a stronger bass presence rather than balance across the strings. The OOO-40 delivers. I loved it so much I traded a much loved, and more expensive Avalon A2-20 to a forum member, for his OOO-40R. Now I have two OOOs and I amvery happy.


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broKen
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« Reply #15 on: September 01, 2017, 03:59:13 PM »


One aspect that I find somewhat lacking on the 40-series, is the saddle blank fit, which isn't as tight as it should be - that could be a batch issue though.


I have replaced all the saddles in my guitars. Its always an improvement. The ooo-40 improved a lot. I'm not sure why but the bone saddle it came with left much to be desired. The fossilized mammoth ivory made a big difference. The trebles ring clear with more sustain and there's reverb now. Even more volume.
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George
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« Reply #16 on: September 01, 2017, 05:04:53 PM »

I have replaced all the saddles in my guitars. Its always an improvement. The ooo-40 improved a lot. I'm not sure why but the bone saddle it came with left much to be desired. The fossilized mammoth ivory made a big difference. The trebles ring clear with more sustain and there's reverb now. Even more volume.

Interesting.  I have had good results with some camel bone saddles and bridge pins.  Who do you get your saddles from?
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George
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« Reply #17 on: September 01, 2017, 05:33:34 PM »

I have replaced all the saddles in my guitars. Its always an improvement. The ooo-40 improved a lot. I'm not sure why but the bone saddle it came with left much to be desired. The fossilized mammoth ivory made a big difference. The trebles ring clear with more sustain and there's reverb now. Even more volume.

From Bob Colosi?
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broKen
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« Reply #18 on: September 01, 2017, 07:04:28 PM »

From Bob Colosi?

Interesting.  I have had good results with some camel bone saddles and bridge pins.  Who do you get your saddles from?

As you know, it is now illegal to ship ivory over state lines, so Mr Colosi has lost my business, unfortunately. But mammoth ivory is still on the menu. David Warther at guitarpartsandmore is in Ohio and sells blanks for saddles. In fact Bob Colosi referred him to me years ago.
Fossilized mammoth ivory is light and hard, but can be tricky to work with. It tends to splinter, but the result it very satisfying.
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« Reply #19 on: September 01, 2017, 11:26:51 PM »

So says JCL. So as I've been messing around with my new ooo-40, I  thought to offer one or two of those improvements. The obvious one is of course the scalloped bracing. Another I noticed while replacing the saddle is the saddle slot was routed  ever so slightly angled so the saddle leans toward the pins to counter the pressure of the strings pushing the saddle toward the sound hole. Also the string ramps cut into the bridge, although I did have to widen the E string ramp slightly.
I'm sure there are more that are not obvious to my untrained eye or ear.
its a fluke. pretty straight forward guitar making
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