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Author Topic: Larrivee build technique?  (Read 505 times)
rosborn
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« on: August 20, 2017, 05:01:05 PM »

Sitting here waiting for the Tigers' game to start...no doubt another loss against the best team in MLB, the Dodgers...I got curious about how the build techniques/methods of Larrivee differ from those of, say, Martin and Taylor? Obviously, Larrivee makes far fewer guitars on a yearly basis than either Martin or Taylor but is this due to a smaller workforce, less automation, fewer work shifts per day, or some other reason I haven't considered?

More specifically, how much hand work goes into each Larrivee guitar? From where I sit, and being a geologist and not a luthier, I would guess the hand work is mostly limited to gluing (sound board, back, braces, etc.) and fitting the dove tail neck joint to the body - like Martin. Is this a fairly accurate guesstimate?


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B0WIE
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« Reply #1 on: August 20, 2017, 05:13:09 PM »

After having their basic form cut, the necks are hand worked.  I know Jean was doing them all himself for a long time but I'm guessing that's changed recently as he's getting on in years.
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broKen
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« Reply #2 on: August 20, 2017, 05:59:07 PM »

Quality and genius take time. That's the way we like it 
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rosborn
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« Reply #3 on: August 20, 2017, 06:06:51 PM »

Quality and genius take time. That's the way we like it 

I agree but that really doesn't address my post.


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George
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« Reply #4 on: August 20, 2017, 06:37:52 PM »

I am certain there are others that can address this more accurately than I can, but every video I have seen of work being done, even at the Oxnard plant, shows some CNC cutting out of parts, and a great deal of bending, aligning, glueing, setting, etc. all done by hand... It is said that Jean still selects all the wood matches and touches every guitar at some point(s) of the process. They are still basically handmade guitars IMHO...
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rosborn
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« Reply #5 on: August 20, 2017, 06:58:45 PM »

I am certain there are others that can address this more accurately than I can, but every video I have seen of work being done, even at the Oxnard plant, shows some CNC cutting out of parts, and a great deal of bending, aligning, glueing, setting, etc. all done by hand... It is said that Jean still selects all the wood matches and touches every guitar at some point(s) of the process. They are still basically handmade guitars IMHO...

That's what I was thinking. At least more so than Martin or Taylor and maybe not as much as a Collings, Santa Cruz, Bourgeois, et al.


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broKen
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« Reply #6 on: August 20, 2017, 08:47:58 PM »

I would guess there is a give and take, or balance between quality and quantity.
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B0WIE
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« Reply #7 on: August 20, 2017, 10:03:16 PM »

I would guess there is a give and take, or balance between quality and quantity.
Absolutely, and it all revolves around the price point. Larrivee does quite a lot at their price point when you consider the materials and American labor.  I believe the production is similar to Martin and others, though you get more for the money with Larrivee, IMO.

Collings, Bourgeois, Froggy, etc are different creatures, with tops and bracing being individuality shaped to tune the instrument. 
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D-02-12
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rosborn
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« Reply #8 on: August 20, 2017, 11:14:09 PM »

Absolutely, and it all revolves around the price point. Larrivee does quite a lot at their price point when you consider the materials and American labor.  I believe the production is similar to Martin and others, though you get more for the money with Larrivee, IMO.

Absolutely! You get way more for your money with a Larrivee than you do a Martin. I would put my OOO-40 up against a 000-18 all day every day. I've owned both guitars and there is no step down from the 000-18 to the OOO-40 despite the fact that the OOO-40 was less than half the cost of the 000-18 - both new.

For the longest time I thought I had to have a Martin in the house. I no longer feel that way.


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mike in lytle
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« Reply #9 on: August 21, 2017, 12:35:28 AM »

For the longest time I thought I had to have a Martin in the house. I no longer feel that way.

Yo.
I had two Martins when I got my first Larrivee.
I now have those two Martins and eight Larrivees.
Mike
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George
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« Reply #10 on: August 21, 2017, 12:37:39 AM »


For the longest time I thought I had to have a Martin in the house. I no longer feel that way.


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Many of us thought the same thing (and many others still do), until we started acquiring Larrivee's...  I still have two Martins, but they rarely get played...
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George
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« Reply #11 on: August 21, 2017, 03:10:29 PM »

Sitting here waiting for the Tigers' game to start...no doubt another loss against the best team in MLB, the Dodgers...I got curious about how the build techniques/methods of Larrivee differ from those of, say, Martin and Taylor? Obviously, Larrivee makes far fewer guitars on a yearly basis than either Martin or Taylor but is this due to a smaller workforce, less automation, fewer work shifts per day, or some other reason I haven't considered?

More specifically, how much hand work goes into each Larrivee guitar? From where I sit, and being a geologist and not a luthier, I would guess the hand work is mostly limited to gluing (sound board, back, braces, etc.) and fitting the dove tail neck joint to the body - like Martin. Is this a fairly accurate guesstimate?


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The necks are rough cut on CNC machine.  Same with braces, bridges, kerfling.Also, inlays pieces are cut on CNC.  I believe everything else is done by hand.  I had a picture series posted on the making of one of my guitars.  The hands on work is total.  Unfortunately, they were photobucket.
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JOYCEfromNS
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« Reply #12 on: August 21, 2017, 06:38:14 PM »


 I had a picture series posted on the making of one of my guitars.  The hands on work is total.  Unfortunately, they were photobucket.
It certainly was one of the best threads eva til Photobucket ruined it   crying
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« Reply #13 on: August 22, 2017, 02:16:16 AM »

lots of hand work. every guitar frame is bent by hand. not to say there is a lot of great bending rigs out there just every jcl is dun by hand
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