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broKen
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« on: June 23, 2017, 03:53:54 AM »

Anyone here using wireless stuff? Mic or guitar signal. Care to tell about it and experiences?
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George
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« Reply #1 on: June 23, 2017, 11:52:23 AM »

I have been using Line 6 digital guitar wireless equipment for many years.  IMHO it is the very best DI for every type of guitars.  A friend of mine in Houston performs live with his every night and just simply runs it through their Presonus digital mixer and models the sounds through his Line 6 POD unit.  The Line 6 digital systems are Noiseless, have excellent dynamic range and extremely reliable.  I started out with the G30 model and graduated up over the years to the most current model the G75.  Analog wireless units of any type are just about useless.  I have a couple of digital wireless mic setups, but I prefer a wired microphone regardless of whether for vocal or guitar.  I have tried some of the low and high end Internal Ear Monitor Wireless systems and have not found one yet that suits me, even with Westone ear sets.  Hope this helps.
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broKen
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« Reply #2 on: June 23, 2017, 05:12:22 PM »

Thanks George, I'm trying to get an understanding of the pros and cons of wireless equipment.
I work entirely alone which makes sound checks hard if not impossible to do.
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ST
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« Reply #3 on: June 24, 2017, 12:25:32 AM »

Another approach.

Instead of going wireless on the input side, get a wireless mixer.  

Record a typical song - two tracks - mic on one, guitar on the other. Take the recording post-trim (no effects or EQ).


Sound check...

Play the recording through the mixer through your mic and guitar channels. Walk around and make adjustments. When satisfied with the sound reconnect the mic and guitar.

Advantages
This might be simpler than getting wireless gear, and you'll have greater flexibility for future shows.

If you already have a tablet of some kind, the small wireless mixers are relatively inexpensive (less than good wireless gear for a mic and a guitar).

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broKen
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« Reply #4 on: June 24, 2017, 04:08:46 AM »

Thanks for the time ST 
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rockstar_not
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« Reply #5 on: August 26, 2017, 02:23:56 PM »

Another approach.

Instead of going wireless on the input side, get a wireless mixer.  

Record a typical song - two tracks - mic on one, guitar on the other. Take the recording post-trim (no effects or EQ).


Sound check...

Play the recording through the mixer through your mic and guitar channels. Walk around and make adjustments. When satisfied with the sound reconnect the mic and guitar.

Advantages
This might be simpler than getting wireless gear, and you'll have greater flexibility for future shows.

If you already have a tablet of some kind, the small wireless mixers are relatively inexpensive (less than good wireless gear for a mic and a guitar).


This is great advice. Choose the tablet wisely. We have a Behringer X32 system at church and allow our singers to mix their in ear monitors remotely using iPhone connection to the mixer.  android controls also available but they allow too much control of the entire mix so our sound guys don't allow use of the android app.  There is a pretty inexpensive rack mount junior version of the x32 you could have all directly wired right next to you and mix and EQ just like ST suggests
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George
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« Reply #6 on: August 26, 2017, 02:42:39 PM »

This is great advice. Choose the tablet wisely. We have a Behringer X32 system at church and allow our singers to mix their in ear monitors remotely using iPhone connection to the mixer.  android controls also available but they allow too much control of the entire mix so our sound guys don't allow use of the android app.  There is a pretty inexpensive rack mount junior version of the x32 you could have all directly wired right next to you and mix and EQ just like ST suggests

This is great advice as well, and can also be used in conjunction with wireless equipment if you desire.  I have one of the Behringer XR12-Xair units and a Samsung tablet that I use.  It certainly simplifies not having to be at the mix board to make changes and can be done from either your playing position or in the audience.  I use my Line6 digital wireless guitar unit and control the parameters from across the room where I play.  These devices allow up to 10 wireless control devices, i.e. smartphone, tablet, pc, etc., for simultaneous use by any/or all the players involved.  Each musician can control their own mix and their own monitor mix.  Wireless digital mixers are definitely the technology to watch going forward.  The Behringer has a built in WiFi Access point which makes it a bit more versatile than the QSC, SoundCraft (must connect to a remote website to work), and others...
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George
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