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Author Topic: an ethical question.  (Read 1408 times)
L07 Shooting Star
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« Reply #20 on: April 12, 2017, 07:45:17 AM »

Overall, my question is...  does it make *any* difference?  Especially laminated blocks of it like you propose.  I don't think it being ivory gives it any special properties.  And, I don't think it being old gives it anything over good old bone.

Ed
My post was an attempt to offer an opinion based on the OP's question about the ethical question of using recycled ivory.

My point, which you obviously missed, is that re-purposed ivory such as what may be obtained from old piano keys, should not be unethical to use.  I just thought some of the ways I have used it (with great results, by the way) might be interesting or useful to some.

I'm not claiming that the ivory, as a material, is superior to any other material used for guitar nuts or saddles.  In my experience, it is better than plastic and at least as good as bone.  You have assumed I'm claiming it has special properties, and that it's better because it's old.  Where did I say that?

I am not simply "proposing" (as you say) laminating those thin strips of ivory for nut and saddle blanks, I am recommending it because I have done it many times with very satisfactory results.  Don't knock it till you've tried it, which I assume you haven't.
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Became a Shooting Star when I got my 1st guitar.
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Still shooting for stardom after all this time.
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eded
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« Reply #21 on: April 12, 2017, 11:12:51 AM »


I am not simply "proposing" (as you say) laminating those thin strips of ivory for nut and saddle blanks, I am recommending it because I have done it many times with very satisfactory results.  Don't knock it till you've tried it, which I assume you haven't.

Not knocking...  questioning the value.  It seems like more work than its worth, to me.  But, if it's what you want to do, have fun! 

Ed
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C-10-4-me
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« Reply #22 on: April 12, 2017, 06:03:38 PM »

If you can recycle that old ivory, I don't see the ethical problem with it, Kevin.
Now here's something that could really have an impact to the survival of African elephants. 
China announces ban on ivory trade by end of 2017
China will ban all domestic ivory trade and processing by the end of 2017, a move described by activists as a potential "game changer" for African elephants.

African ivory is highly sought after in China, where it is seen as a status symbol, and prices can reach as high as $1,100 a kg.

"China will gradually stop the processing and sales of ivories for commercial purposes by the end of 2017," the official Xinhua news agency said on Friday, citing a government statement.

Interesting. Now if only China had taken a similar approach to importing Madagascar Rosewood there would still be ample supplies of it. Unfortunately,they did not.
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B0WIE
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« Reply #23 on: April 15, 2017, 06:17:09 AM »

Overall, my question is...  does it make *any* difference?  Especially laminated blocks of it like you propose.  I don't think it being ivory gives it any special properties.  And, I don't think it being old gives it anything over good old bone.

Ed
When you say "it being ivory", well that certainly does make a difference as ivory saddles sound different than bone.  But, I'd imagine the other aspects (like being stacked laminates) would negate that.  I'm sure they'd still make a difference but probably not a positive one (though I've never tried the laminates).
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Paraclete
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« Reply #24 on: April 16, 2017, 05:45:57 AM »

Why not?  Sounds like a great idea to me.  I've played with picks made from old piano keys.  Also, there are people who look for old tortoise shell combs and whatnot to carve into picks.
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L07 Shooting Star
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« Reply #25 on: April 16, 2017, 06:34:46 AM »

Why not?  Sounds like a great idea to me.  I've played with picks made from old piano keys.  Also, there are people who look for old tortoise shell combs and whatnot to carve into picks.

All I can say is that nut and saddle blanks, made by laminating layers of old ivory piano key veneers, then re-cut and shaped, resemble the same parts made of bone in terms of machinability and tone.  My assessment is from experience and not theory.
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"Badges?  We don't need no stinkin' badges."

Became a Shooting Star when I got my 1st guitar.
Back in '66, I was 13 and that was my fix.
Still shooting for stardom after all this time.
If I never make it, I'll still be fine.


 
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