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Author Topic: Those Canadians are fine musicians  (Read 994 times)
Danny
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« on: January 18, 2017, 06:05:32 AM »

     I just spent about four hours watching "Bob Dylan and THE BAND, DOWN IN THE FLOOD." Which is a fine history of the music from big pink and the compliment of The Band to Dylan,  and then their own exploration of Americana Music in THE BAND album. In it's own way that film is better than THE LAST WALTZ.
        BUT after watching DOWN IN THE FLOOD, I had to see the LAST WALTZ again.

      Down in the Flood lays out the importance of The Band,  and how they changed the direction of music.  That still is being felt today among so many musicians.

       Lately their music and Dylan's is what I play at the jams around Austin that I go to.  And my old D-02 is what I mostly use. A few weeks ago at a jam, a very good player asked to play the D-02, he could have played it much longer,  but we needed to get home.  He had nothing but good things to say about my 17 year old Larrivee, as most musicians do.
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Too many guitars... But I keep thinking one more may just do it.
ollaimh
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« Reply #1 on: January 18, 2017, 07:53:42 AM »

the band had a couple of americans as well, but they came together in toronto canada and were where robbie robertson became a star.  a canadian mohawk.
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Danny
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« Reply #2 on: January 18, 2017, 09:08:33 AM »

the band had a couple of americans as well, but they came together in toronto canada and were where robbie robertson became a star.  a canadian mohawk.
Yup, two drummers.  But in my mind Levon Helm was the only member of "THE BAND" from the U.S.  Which was a perfect fit,  being from the south and having that deep Southern accent.
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Too many guitars... But I keep thinking one more may just do it.
ducktrapper
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« Reply #3 on: January 18, 2017, 01:42:07 PM »

the band had a couple of americans as well, but they came together in toronto canada and were where robbie robertson became a star.  a canadian mohawk.  

They mostly got their start, in Canada, under a transplanted Arkansan, Ronnie Hawkins, as the Hawks. And as The Hawks, behind Bob Dylan, had Mickey Jones sit in on drums when Levon Helm opted out of the English tour in '66. But as The Band? One American. Levon Helm. Robbie Robertson, guitarist and main writer, was half Mohawk and half Jewish from Toronto. The other three, Richard Manuel, Rick Danko and Garth Hudson were all from Southern Ontario's tobacco belt around Simcoe. I hope that sets the record straight.      
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ducktrapper
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« Reply #4 on: January 18, 2017, 01:48:39 PM »

    I just spent about four hours watching "Bob Dylan and THE BAND, DOWN IN THE FLOOD." Which is a fine history of the music from big pink and the compliment of The Band to Dylan,  and then their own exploration of Americana Music in THE BAND album. In it's own way that film is better than THE LAST WALTZ.
        BUT after watching DOWN IN THE FLOOD, I had to see the LAST WALTZ again.

      Down in the Flood lays out the importance of The Band,  and how they changed the direction of music.  That still is being felt today among so many musicians.

       Lately their music and Dylan's is what I play at the jams around Austin that I go to.  And my old D-02 is what I mostly use. A few weeks ago at a jam, a very good player asked to play the D-02, he could have played it much longer,  but we needed to get home.  He had nothing but good things to say about my 17 year old Larrivee, as most musicians do.

I need to see that. And read Robbie's book "Testimony". I love The Band.
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Walkerman
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« Reply #5 on: January 20, 2017, 01:38:50 AM »

The Band, like Cheap Trick, was a band I enjoyed so much more live than on their studio albums.
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flatlander
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« Reply #6 on: January 20, 2017, 02:59:01 AM »

I watched that documentary. It was a good one. One of my best times at a live show was seeing The Band about 83' I'm thinking. Post Robertson but the rest originals there and honestly, they didn't need him. It was in Norfolk, I think the name of the place was The Boat House?
Anyway it was like an old warehouse on the water. Kind of funky. They were great. Folks were going nuts. They played one encore. The crowd called for more. Kept chanting and chanting. It took over half an hour for them to come back, but they did. (after a good retune I'm sure) When they did come back they did an entire hour or more of straight Ronnie Hawkins type rock and roll non-stop. Everybody was up and I mean they blew the xxxxxxx house down. Very,very special set.
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ducktrapper
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« Reply #7 on: January 24, 2017, 09:07:27 PM »

I was fortunate enough to see The Band and Bob Dylan in Toronto on the 1974 Before the Flood tour. Fabulous stuff. There's a great, if a little depressing, doc on Levon Helm on Netflix (I believe) called I Ain't in it for the Money. Very interesting but Levon was a very bitter guy at that time. I saw him at the Winnipeg Folk Festival not long before his death. He started singing Ophelia and his voice just disappeared in the first line or so. He left the stage for a bit, came back but his son in law, Larry Campbell, had to do most of vocals for the rest of that night. The throat cancer got the best of him not long after.       
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