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Barefoot Rob
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« on: June 29, 2016, 04:59:01 PM »

RIP Scotty Moore.With out him we wouldn't of had Elvis and without him we wouldn't of had many more.
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« Reply #1 on: June 29, 2016, 09:15:37 PM »

RIP Scotty
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ducktrapper
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« Reply #2 on: June 29, 2016, 09:23:46 PM »

Another great loss. He defined a certain type of guitar playing. RIP Mr. Moore.
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Mikeymac
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« Reply #3 on: June 30, 2016, 01:36:40 PM »

Another great loss. He defined a certain type of guitar playing. RIP Mr. Moore.

Makes me want to ask a musically philosophical question:

Who was more influential, Elvis or Prince? Or is it a non-starter because they were from different eras? 

RIP Mr. Moore. You shaped a generation for sure.
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mike in lytle
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« Reply #4 on: June 30, 2016, 01:53:36 PM »

Makes me want to ask a musically philosophical question:
Who was more influential, Elvis or Prince? Or is it a non-starter because they were from different eras? 
RIP Mr. Moore. You shaped a generation for sure.

Well, if we look at our pop culture....
Elvis has a lot more characteristics to impersonate, voice, style, movements.
Lot's of people making a living off of doing that.
We have Elvis impersonators doing TV commercials, I saw an insurance commercial with 3 Elvis impersonators.
That is sort of influential.
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ducktrapper
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« Reply #5 on: June 30, 2016, 08:24:26 PM »

Makes me want to ask a musically philosophical question:

Who was more influential, Elvis or Prince? Or is it a non-starter because they were from different eras? 

RIP Mr. Moore. You shaped a generation for sure.

Unlike Elvis, Prince, while a tremendous talent,  had giants who preceded him in the same style.   
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Walkerman
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« Reply #6 on: July 01, 2016, 05:37:51 AM »

Prince never ever had the social impact that Elvis or the Beatles had.  His musical catalog is insignificant compared to theirs.
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« Reply #7 on: July 02, 2016, 02:08:46 AM »

Unlike Elvis, Prince, while a tremendous talent,  had giants who preceded him in the same style.   

Prince never ever had the social impact that Elvis or the Beatles had.  His musical catalog is insignificant compared to theirs.

I agree with both of these observations. Well said, gentlemen! 
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skyline
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« Reply #8 on: July 12, 2016, 04:19:39 AM »

Scotty Moore was a major reason Elvis went anywhere. Considering how radio/music-promotion worked in those days, he may have been the reason Elvis went anywhere.

"If I have seen further, it is by standing on the shoulders of giants."
     - Isaac Newton


Elvis stood on the shoulders of musicians that in his day were unknown - to many people - musicians we now recognize as giants (though there are many who will deny they were giants, or even that they existed, for various reasons)

Why knock Prince for standing on shoulders, while Elvis get's pumped up?

Like the Beatles, Elvis had a lot of tunes that got heavy airplay, for decades and decades. For a certain age group, airplay and familiarity seem to be the only deciding factors in musical relevance.

Both the Beatles and Elvis have a lot of great tunes that resonate with a certain age group - but music didn't end when people born in the 50's turned twenty-seven. It didn't end when they turned forty, or even when they turned sixty . . .

Welcome to the internetz

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BB1TKw8_b1s

Posterity will show that tune to be at least as important as any tune by Elvis or The Beatles - actually I expect it will be more relevant
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« Reply #9 on: July 14, 2016, 02:14:34 AM »

hmmm . . . 24 hours and no one has taken me down a peg (or two)

We Are DEVO?
Hopefully it's just because everyone is enjoying something more important than the internetz. 
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ducktrapper
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« Reply #10 on: July 14, 2016, 01:01:39 PM »

hmmm . . . 24 hours and no one has taken me down a peg (or two)

We Are DEVO?
Hopefully it's just because everyone is enjoying something more important than the internetz. 

Some targets are just too easy. Would we have even heard of Scotty without Elvis? Like the Beatles, a fortunate confluence of people, events and timing. You can't pull building blocks away without the entire edifice being in danger of collapsing, all the parts are important but the driving force behind the thing should get the most credit. Sure we must remember and credit Sam Philips and George Martin et al remembering, however, that while the jockey's important, it's the horse that runs.
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skyline
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« Reply #11 on: July 15, 2016, 04:36:37 AM »

Some targets are just too easy. Would we have even heard of Scotty without Elvis? Like the Beatles, a fortunate confluence of people, events and timing. You can't pull building blocks away without the entire edifice being in danger of collapsing, all the parts are important but the driving force behind the thing should get the most credit. Sure we must remember and credit Sam Philips and George Martin et al remembering, however, that while the jockey's important, it's the horse that runs.

Nice analogy - I'll run with it:

Horses don't get to enter races without jockeys.

Jockey's are hired by owners - or at least by trainers (who are hired by owners)

So considering Scotty, George, Prince, Elvis, The Colonel ,et al - which ones are horses, which are jockeys, who are the trainers and the owners?
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Walkerman
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« Reply #12 on: September 17, 2016, 01:40:48 PM »


"Posterity will show that tune to be at least as important as any tune by Elvis or The Beatles - actually I expect it will be more relevant"

Now, that there is a funny statement.  She is less talented and relevant than a single hair off the head of any of the Beatles, or Elvis for that matter.
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George
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« Reply #13 on: September 17, 2016, 02:21:58 PM »


Welcome to the internetz

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BB1TKw8_b1s

Posterity will show that tune to be at least as important as any tune by Elvis or The Beatles - actually I expect it will be more relevant

Maybe, but both she and others will most likely be better remembered for the obvious heartfelt passion and compassion they poured into their music.
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George
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« Reply #14 on: September 17, 2016, 03:19:27 PM »

"Posterity will show that tune to be at least as important as any tune by Elvis or The Beatles - actually I expect it will be more relevant"

Now, that there is a funny statement.  She is less talented and relevant than a single hair off the head of any of the Beatles, or Elvis for that matter.

The tune - not the singer - the song was written by Prince
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Walkerman
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« Reply #15 on: September 17, 2016, 04:27:29 PM »

The tune - not the singer - the song was written by Prince

Well , my comment applies to the song, the singer and the writer.  I am one of those who thinks that the word "legendary" is being randomly applied to way too many artists nowadays. It seems that every artist or band that plays at an Indian reservation casino or county fair is now legendary.  I don't think so.  I am guessing that I hear as many Beatles' songs on the radio in a day as I hear from Prince and O'Connor combined in a year.  Maybe longer.
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skyline
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« Reply #16 on: September 18, 2016, 02:53:00 AM »

Well , my comment applies to the song, the singer and the writer.  I am one of those who thinks that the word "legendary" is being randomly applied to way too many artists nowadays. It seems that every artist or band that plays at an Indian reservation casino or county fair is now legendary.  I don't think so.  I am guessing that I hear as many Beatles' songs on the radio in a day as I hear from Prince and O'Connor combined in a year.  Maybe longer.

I missed the word "legendary" - legends exist entirely in minds - and the vast number of minds engaged with music today will not have any concern for the Beatles of Elvis unless their grandparents have somehow drummed them into their consciousness.

To many of us born at a certain time, J, P, G, and R are fundaments of musical heritage, at least when they are connected to "The Beatles" (in the early 80's there were teens who knew and loved songs from "Band on the Run" but didn't care for any Beatles tunes)
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Walkerman
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« Reply #17 on: September 18, 2016, 02:52:16 PM »

I missed the word "legendary" - legends exist entirely in minds - and the vast number of minds engaged with music today will not have any concern for the Beatles of Elvis unless their grandparents have somehow drummed them into their consciousness.

To many of us born at a certain time, J, P, G, and R are fundaments of musical heritage, at least when they are connected to "The Beatles" (in the early 80's there were teens who knew and loved songs from "Band on the Run" but didn't care for any Beatles tunes)

Right .... Just as no one today has any concern for folks like Motzart or Beethoven. 
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skyline
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« Reply #18 on: September 18, 2016, 05:16:46 PM »

Right .... Just as no one today has any concern for folks like Motzart or Beethoven. 
Siting Wolfie and Ludwig reinforces what I'm saying: a tightly controlled formal music market means modern orchestras play a lot of them, displacing works by their predecessors, contemporaries, and later composers. If orchestral directors don't program from the dozen bits of Mozart and Beethoven that people know, the invariably see a dip in seat sales.

There was a time when that would have been true for radio and Beatles tunes, but now, playing fewer Beatles tunes doesn't affect radio stations at all (or youtube, spotify, etc...)

The dominance of the Beatles over the listening habits of a certain generation has far more to do with hyper controlled playlists, payola, and marketing than it has to do with their music.

The Beatles sold millions of records in the sixties (then resold them multiple times in various formats to the same consumers) despite that, their current airplay is virtually nil.

Enrico Caruso also sold millions of records - in 1902 - not many people have him in high rotation these days though.

Thirty years from now you'll see tunes like Yesterday, or Here There and Everywhere in the same set lists as you see Some Enchanted Evening, and My Favourite Things.
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Walkerman
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« Reply #19 on: September 18, 2016, 08:53:00 PM »

Dream on.  Current airplay is virtually nil?  That there is some funny s**t.
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