Pages: 1 2 [3]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Oldest capo?  (Read 7194 times)
JamesN
Senior Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 312




Ignore
« Reply #40 on: May 17, 2016, 12:26:20 AM »

Back in the '70s, I too had the Dunlop and Hamilton models already posted. The Dunlop would always seem to pop off in the middle of songs. Perhaps that's why some folks called them "trigger" capos?   And the spring in the Hamilton was so strong I was always afraid it was going to crush my neck.  blush

I also had this one:



You would put it around the neck of the guitar with the upper bar open, then swing the bar around and hook it on the latch. Then you would tighten it by ratcheting up on the lever on the bottom. That lever was flat on 3 sides so you could get different tensions depending on which position you stopped on. Oh, and the rubber piece was four sided with different heights to each side so it could be flipped around to best suit your particular guitar.  It was about as a big a PIA as it sounds, and the tension was always too loose or too tight.

I had this one too:



Can't remember who made it, but it was an interesting concept.  Those two metal clips bisecting the top bar were supposed to sit between the 1st and 2nd and the 5th and 6th strings. You were supposed slide the capo into position by bumping those two clips up against the back of the fret on which you wanted the capo. Then you would tighten the thumbscrew on the bottom to hold it in place. The idea was that the clips would align the capo so that the rubber piece would clamp down precisely on top of the fret rather than behind it. (The rubber piece was actually two thin pieces. One piece would push down on top of the fret as I noted, and the other a half inch or so behind it.) The theory (IIRC) was that clamping down directly on the fret was supposed to eliminate intonation problems, as you could tighten the thumbscrew just enough for the strings to sound cleanly but not enough to go out of tune.

And yeah, that one also worked about as well as you can imagine. Those slots you see that the clips ride in were so you could adjust the spacing of the clips and were necessary because the spacing of guitar strings typically changes as you move up the neck. So you had to readjust the clips every time you wanted to move the capo to a different fret position. Luckily the top bar could be disassembled and the clips removed and thrown in the garbage where they belonged. Once that was done, one had oneself a fairly decent Planet Waves/D'Addario style capo decades before those actually appeared.  
Logged
Mr_LV19E
Gold Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6500




Ignore
« Reply #41 on: May 17, 2016, 02:58:07 PM »

Those are some good examples, haven't seen either before.
Logged

Roger


"Live simply so that others may simply live"
rockstar_not
Gold Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2313


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #42 on: May 17, 2016, 05:54:49 PM »

Regarding JamesN 's second photo....  I use Kyser capos like that with the pad resting on the strings on top of the fret wire, but just the edge of the pad. This puts the clamping force thru the fret itself rather than stretching the strings. It takes a little practice t apply it this way, but it removes one of the major complaints about Kyser and other spring loaded capos, that being that they pull the strings sharp.
Logged

2000 L-03-E
2012 Epiphone Nighthawk Custom Reissue
1985 Peavey Milestone
2004 SX SPJ-62 Bass
2008 Valencia Solid Cedar Top Classical
2015 Taylor 414ce - won in drawing
2016 Ibanez SR655BBF

My Sound Cloud
Mr_LV19E
Gold Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6500




Ignore
« Reply #43 on: May 17, 2016, 06:45:02 PM »

Wow - that second one looks like it might work well with this guitar:



It looks like a time machine.  afro
Logged

Roger


"Live simply so that others may simply live"
flatlander
Gold Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3804




Ignore
« Reply #44 on: May 26, 2016, 01:26:34 PM »

My first one was a pencil and rubber band. First harmonica holder, a coat hanger. (back when they were metal)
Logged

10-1614 more than a number, it's body and soul.
broKen
Gold Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2659




Ignore
« Reply #45 on: May 28, 2016, 05:11:52 AM »


A lot of guitar's have hidden characters that can be coaxed out with a capo . . .

That is especially true of my SD. The higher I capo, the stronger the overtones. No capo, no overtones
Logged

A Hebrew, under the Spell
Pain is a good thing
The cost of living is...life
L07 Shooting Star
Gold Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3721




Ignore
« Reply #46 on: May 28, 2016, 05:15:38 AM »

My first one was a pencil and rubber band. First harmonica holder, a coat hanger. (back when they were metal)

I made my first harmonica holder from a coat hanger also.
Logged

"Badges?  We don't need no stinkin' badges."

Became a Shooting Star when I got my 1st guitar.
Back in '66, I was 13 and that was my fix.
Still shooting for stardom after all this time.
If I never make it, I'll still be fine.


 
skyline
Senior Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 419




Ignore
« Reply #47 on: May 28, 2016, 11:38:31 AM »

That is especially true of my SD. The higher I capo, the stronger the overtones. No capo, no overtones

Yes! And the attack really changes too, more pop at the start.

Then there's the "tune down / capo up" trick. Shifts an SD from piano ring to pipe organ pedals oomph
Logged
ducktrapper
Donuts?
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 11007




Ignore
« Reply #48 on: May 28, 2016, 12:46:25 PM »

Then there's the baritone guitar. Sort of like a reverse capo.
Logged
Pages: 1 2 [3]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to: