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Author Topic: Setup/Maintenance Issues.  (Read 6003 times)
B0WIE
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« Reply #20 on: November 15, 2015, 07:16:43 PM »

I don't know the humidity level or how to measure it.  It hasn't rained here in a couple weeks, but the Autumn air is very damp, and my A/C is still running for part of the day. 
I recommend, no, URGE you to get proactive in humidity control.  It's not unusual for guitars to crack when the humidity drops due to household heating and cooling.  And if you use a case humidifier year-round, you'll be over humidifying at times, which makes the guitar sound and play bad.
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D-02-12
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Mr_LV19E
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« Reply #21 on: November 15, 2015, 10:40:43 PM »

What area of Texas do you live in?
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Roger


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Caleb
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« Reply #22 on: November 16, 2015, 04:44:28 AM »

Dallas area.
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Mr_LV19E
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« Reply #23 on: November 16, 2015, 04:30:02 PM »

According to currentresults.com Dallas seems to have average humidity levels on the high side. Of course your inside readings will be different depending on open windows, air conditioning etc. I would recommend getting a Acurite hygrometer from Wallmart to monitor your indoor humidity.  Like Bowie says, high humidity is a tone killer, damp wood is not going to vibrate like dry wood.

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Roger


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Danny
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« Reply #24 on: November 16, 2015, 04:38:12 PM »

  get two hygrometers , they are inexpensive and you can be more assured that they are reading correctly. I have about five, plus one expensive fast reacting one.
The small ones fit in a case as well.
     We had a dry air mass hover over Texas about a month ago that brought the humidity level way low. That's when they need to be in cases.
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Caleb
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« Reply #25 on: December 07, 2015, 11:08:33 PM »

Well, it turns out that my Larrivee needs some new frets.  I hadn't paid attn to it, but the luthier I took it to pointed out the flat spots to me.  They are pretty deep.  He is going to replace the first six frets.  The guitar is about 13 years old, and I tend to fret it like I'm choking a bear when I play, so it has some wear on it.  Will post results and my thoughts when I get it back.
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L07 Shooting Star
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« Reply #26 on: December 08, 2015, 12:20:16 AM »

Dan Erlewine has a book called GUITAR PLAYER REPAIR GUIDE. I have had the third edition for quite awhile and refer to it often for tips, technique and specs.
  It's worth having around.

I agree.  I've had my copy for 5 or 6 years.  It's a good reference book for doing setups and adjustments.  I also have copies of his "How To Make Your Electric Guitar Play Great", "Fretwork - Step by Step", and "Guitar Finishing - Step by Step"  Even if you don't want to tackle your own work, these books give you a much better understanding of all the relationships going on with your guitars.  It doesn't hurt to have some of this knowledge when you talk to repair people and sales people as well.
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Barefoot Rob
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« Reply #27 on: December 08, 2015, 03:33:15 AM »

Calab if it needs a refret for the first 5 get a full refret done because he is going to have to file those first 5 frets to the height of the rest of the frets.I wish I was there to help as I have found that 99% of the time a leveling and recrown may work if you know what your doing.
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A REPAIRPERSON,Still Unclrob
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Caleb
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« Reply #28 on: December 08, 2015, 04:04:40 AM »

Calab if it needs a refret for the first 5 get a full refret done because he is going to have to file those first 5 frets to the height of the rest of the frets.I wish I was there to help as I have found that 99% of the time a leveling and recrown may work if you know what your doing.
Rob, thanks for chiming in. He was going to dress the frets but said I'd likely be back in a year for new frets.  I think the frets above the sixth or so are in great shape as I've barely played out of the first position.   But I told him to do whatever he thinks is best, so who knows, he may end up doing them all once he gets into it.  I'll post an update when I get back the guitar.
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Mr_LV19E
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« Reply #29 on: December 08, 2015, 08:52:30 PM »

If the upper frets have never been dressed, changing out the lower ones would be better than filing down all of them to remove the grooves on the lower ones. Just my opinion.
I have a feeling the grooves are pretty deep on the first 4 or 5 frets E,B and G.
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Roger


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Caleb
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« Reply #30 on: December 08, 2015, 09:30:05 PM »

Grooves are very deep. I should've snagged a pic for before/after.   

I've been wondering: Do you all think my heavy capo usage contributed to this, or is 13 years about right for a set of frets?  I don't really even play all that much, but I probably play more than I think I do. 
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B0WIE
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« Reply #31 on: December 08, 2015, 11:14:29 PM »

Grooves are very deep. I should've snagged a pic for before/after.   

I've been wondering: Do you all think my heavy capo usage contributed to this, or is 13 years about right for a set of frets?  I don't really even play all that much, but I probably play more than I think I do. 
If you leave the capo on when the guitar is put away, yes.  13 years of moderate play isn't unusual for a re-fret.  Some people go through frets quicker than others.  I barely see any wear on my favorite guitars (I still have my first guitar from 25 years ago and the frets looks almost new) but some guys will go through frets in 3 years.  Depends on your grip, tuning, picking technique, strings, etc.
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D-02-12
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Barefoot Rob
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« Reply #32 on: December 09, 2015, 03:20:00 AM »

My partcaster tele has been around since 1975,its been my main electric with lots of gigging and I've dressed the frets once.Lighten up on the pressure in your chording hand,remove the capo at the end of the night.As a repairperson I have done dressing on guitars that every other tech said should have been refretted and with proper maintenance a once a year visit to your favorite tech/luthier a refret may nevr be needed.
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L07 Shooting Star
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« Reply #33 on: December 09, 2015, 05:33:05 AM »

There are lots of good opinions being offered here; some of them conflicting.  Since none of us have seen the guitar and it's current condition, I say go with what your luthier recommends.  Assuming he is competent and you trust his judgement, he is in the best position to assess the guitar and deal with it's frets.
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"Badges?  We don't need no stinkin' badges."

Became a Shooting Star when I got my 1st guitar.
Back in '66, I was 13 and that was my fix.
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If I never make it, I'll still be fine.


 
Caleb
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« Reply #34 on: December 09, 2015, 11:43:37 AM »

Lots of good input here and I feel I've learned a few things. 

More about my guitar: I don't leave a capo on the fretboard, but do use one of those Paige capos that rolls behind the nut when not in use.  I use Martin med strings and have for years.  I keep the guitar tuned down a whole step at all times, which means I have to capo a lot to play in standard tuning.  I do play with an especially hard grip and always have.  Probably due to my early years playing cheap and poorly setup guitars and having to fight with them.  I'm not sure if I'll be able to break that habit. 

The main wear on the frets was around the second and third frets under the plain strings.  I was expecting the wound strings to wear down the frets more but apparently the plain ones are harder on them. 

I knew I had to do something because the guitar was getting impossible to play in tune.  But I had no idea that bad/uneven frets could cause such trouble.  Makes sense though. 
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Danny
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« Reply #35 on: December 09, 2015, 02:31:13 PM »

Even the most worn frets on all the guitars I have and have had where improved with dressing and recrowning. But your heavy hand may have made these too low.  Seems like you would have divots in the fretboard as well.
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« Reply #36 on: December 09, 2015, 03:24:32 PM »

Even the most worn frets on all the guitars I have and have had where improved with dressing and recrowning. But your heavy hand may have made these too low.  Seems like you would have divots in the fretboard as well.
I have an old Takamine G330 that I got when I was 18 (I'm 41 now). It has serious divots in the fretboard's first position. It holds tune and plays in tune like dream though. This same luthier dressed its frets a couple years back.
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Mr_LV19E
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« Reply #37 on: December 09, 2015, 04:40:48 PM »

I don't like grooves in my frets and am guilty of probably fretting too hard but I dress my frets more often than most i'm sure.  Dressing the frets more often means all the frets are losing their height equally during their life, if on the other hand you never dress your frets and wear grooves in the first few frets and they become deep you can most likely still get away with dressing them and moving on. But why?  Chances are the upper frets are "as new" with no wear what so ever. In this case I would rather replace the first 5 frets making them all "as new",  follow that up with a leveling and crowning and you have years of fret life left.
If you have worn deep grooves in the first five frets you will need to remove an awful lot of fret material on all the frets to get them level, the more you remove the more work it is to re-crown them. Then you need to address the nut slots, they will need to be lowered. When you eventually replace all the frets you will need a new nut.

My guess is when he is done replacing those lower frets, dressing and crowning and adjusting the nut slots the guitar will play much easier resulting in you not having to press so hard to get clean notes or chords.  You are going to fall in love with that Larrivee all over again. Good luck to you  
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Roger


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« Reply #38 on: December 09, 2015, 04:58:11 PM »

About a year or so ago, I put in a little plywood door at the bottom of the steps to keep an annoying cat from coming up and waking us up.  In mid summer, it is (typically) a tight fit.  When it swings freely, I know it is time to turn on the humidifier.  I don't need hygrometer.  LOL!

Ed
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L07 Shooting Star
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« Reply #39 on: December 10, 2015, 08:14:53 AM »

I don't like grooves in my frets and am guilty of probably fretting too hard but I dress my frets more often than most i'm sure.  Dressing the frets more often means all the frets are losing their height equally during their life, if on the other hand you never dress your frets and wear grooves in the first few frets and they become deep you can most likely still get away with dressing them and moving on. But why?  Chances are the upper frets are "as new" with no wear what so ever. In this case I would rather replace the first 5 frets making them all "as new",  follow that up with a leveling and crowning and you have years of fret life left.
If you have worn deep grooves in the first five frets you will need to remove an awful lot of fret material on all the frets to get them level, the more you remove the more work it is to re-crown them. Then you need to address the nut slots, they will need to be lowered. When you eventually replace all the frets you will need a new nut.

My guess is when he is done replacing those lower frets, dressing and crowning and adjusting the nut slots the guitar will play much easier resulting in you not having to press so hard to get clean notes or chords.  You are going to fall in love with that Larrivee all over again. Good luck to you  

I agree with this 100%.    +1
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"Badges?  We don't need no stinkin' badges."

Became a Shooting Star when I got my 1st guitar.
Back in '66, I was 13 and that was my fix.
Still shooting for stardom after all this time.
If I never make it, I'll still be fine.


 
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