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ducktrapper
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« Reply #20 on: May 04, 2013, 12:40:13 PM »

Kevin, the G7 is a very good capo (not sure it's the most expensive) but I still prefer the lighter and also easy to use Planet Waves NS capo which I've also found no tuning problems with if applied properly. I have one G7 and two NS capoes if that says anything. I gather the newer G7's are lighter though so ... if so, I agree it's a mighty fine capo and super easy to use.       
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« Reply #21 on: May 04, 2013, 01:16:40 PM »

the ONLY capo I have EVER owned where I do NOT have this problem is  G7 capo.

I never have to retune with either my Kayser or my Shubb, and I'm really picky about tuning.  For me, the key is in where I place it.  As rockstar_not does, I try to get it a little over the back half of the fret.  That's a bit tricky with the Kayser, but really easy with the Shubb, so the Kayser doesn't really have a speed advantage for me.  It's also important to make sure it isn't slightly twisted so that there's even pressure on both sides of the fretboard.
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ducktrapper
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« Reply #22 on: May 04, 2013, 02:00:04 PM »

I try never to tune with a capo in place. Tune first, apply properly, no problem. It has always puzzled me how some players, apparently, don't know how to position a capo. As an aside, I've met guys who don't know that the capo actually changes the key. I watched a guy shouting out to the band, he got up to jam with, that the key was G. He had a capo on the third fret and he was  holding down what, to him, was a G chord. Heh.    
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« Reply #23 on: May 04, 2013, 04:06:59 PM »

Ya, I get the arguments and suggestions here, I haven't tried a planet waves, because I'm so enamoured with the G7.

I think what is MOST appealing to ME in this scenario, is the G7, because of it's ease and design, and no springs pulling the strings sharp, it can be used with terrific results on any guitar including electrics, (THAT'S a challenge).

It goes with-out saying I'm in tune and my intonation is dead on, the clutch-apply ONLY enough as needed, is simply a guarantee for me that, even if I'm in a hurry, and apply it in bad light, a little crooked, it still wins the day. The only time I might have not got it on right, I had to tune the 1st E string, on the fly, (as we can all do under pressure)

The other thing is, if your string are dead, or going dead, and you already are having tuning issues, well, the Capo ain't gonna help you there either...
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« Reply #24 on: May 05, 2013, 02:18:09 PM »

To you guys who use the G7th...

Any preference between the Performance and the Newport models, and if so why? I've been using Shubbs for decades but I'm thinking of trying out a G7th.
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« Reply #25 on: May 05, 2013, 03:06:54 PM »

To you guys who use the G7th...

Any preference between the Performance and the Newport models, and if so why? I've been using Shubbs for decades but I'm thinking of trying out a G7th.



hmmm, I only bought the G7, (Also used Shubbs for decades) but I didn't even know there were other models, I think I got mine when they first came out (couple years ago?), so I can't help you much there.

if you have a good relationship with your store, ask to try both I guess.....
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« Reply #26 on: May 05, 2013, 03:18:51 PM »



hmmm, I only bought the G7, (Also used Shubbs for decades) but I didn't even know there were other models, I think I got mine when they first came out (couple years ago?), so I can't help you much there.

if you have a good relationship with your store, ask to try both I guess.....

From what I can glean from their website, on the Performance model, one tunes the "pressure" of the capo by squeezing it after applying. On the Newport model, there is a thumbscrew that can be used to alter the pressure after applying. Also the Newport is supposed to be lighter in weight.

There is also a Nashville model that looks to work more like a Kyser.
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ducktrapper
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« Reply #27 on: May 05, 2013, 04:06:30 PM »

I believe Headsup and I both have the original G7 with the pressure system. Ratcheting, I guess. You just position it and squeeze. To release, there's a little button on the top. 
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« Reply #28 on: May 05, 2013, 09:53:16 PM »

Planet Waves NS. small, light, nicely designed, cheap enough.
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« Reply #29 on: May 06, 2013, 07:10:07 PM »

I never have to retune with either my Kayser or my Shubb, and I'm really picky about tuning.  For me, the key is in where I place it.  As rockstar_not does, I try to get it a little over the back half of the fret.  That's a bit tricky with the Kayser, but really easy with the Shubb, so the Kayser doesn't really have a speed advantage for me.  It's also important to make sure it isn't slightly twisted so that there's even pressure on both sides of the fretboard.
If I have the time, I'll search through the forums and show photos of what I'm talking about.  I've been capo-ing this way with a Kyser since before 1999, when I bought my Larry.  I don't use capos on electric mostly because I'm noodling 3 and 4 string chords for the most part up the neck, and solo-ing - not having to strum away like I do on the Larry.

-Scott

Ah yes, a little search on the forum and I found the image - click for a larger version.  I submit that ANY capo can be used without pulling strings sharp, if you take the care to place it correctly.  Wrong way, sure to pull strings sharp:


Right way, will work with any capo without pulling strings sharp (but might crowd your fretting hand for open chord shapes):


I can see that I took this photo with my older Kyser.  The spring actually broke on that one, I now have one with the more 'curl-i-que' lever end, instead of the one with the hole.

I have yet to have a need to try the G7 or Bird of Paradise or other cam action capos other than the Shubb I had in my Strat case (matched the curvature and width of the fretboard a little better than these Kysers do.
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« Reply #30 on: May 06, 2013, 09:03:49 PM »

One thing I really like about my G7 is the ability to use it as partial capo.  I often use it reversed to leave bottom string uncapoed which gives me a good drop-string effect (for example 2nd fret makes a Drop-E in D fingering).  The joint is small enough that it doesn't interfere being on the back side of the neck and I don't get any between string buzzes. Works particularly well on my wide-neck SD-60, but still fine on my other Larrivees.

I agree about the tuning issue - I find it works well without re-tuning once you learn how to squeeze it evenly and makes for fast changes.
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« Reply #31 on: May 06, 2013, 09:54:12 PM »

I really love Shubb capos. I recently bought a normal 6 string Shubb for my Larrivee but due to the wider fingerboard, I ran into problems with my high E string popping out of place when I do quick hammer-ons and pull offs. So I returned it and got a 12-string version and now it works like a dream. I do feel like tuning with capos is a love-hate thing. I don't mind so much to "take the time to tune." It's the 5 T's of rock and roll!  bigrin
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« Reply #32 on: May 08, 2013, 11:49:37 PM »

I just took a plunge on a G7th Newport model. So far, it's not working well for me. My main problem is that if I bend a string with the capo on, it stays bent. That is: it stays at the bent position and doesn't return to the original position. If I tighten the thumbscrew to where the strings are taught enough that this doesn't happen, then all the extra pressure puts the strings out of tune.

Clearly there's something here that I'm not grasping. I'll have to experiment some more, but so far I'm not liking it better than my faithful Shubb.
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« Reply #33 on: May 09, 2013, 12:26:11 AM »

Hmm - sounds more like it's your capo that's "not grasping"

Is this the case on every fret?

The issue gets more pronounced the higher up the capo is.

Here are pre- and post- pics of what happens when I do a bend on the G string (capo on 4th fret)...



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harptech
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« Reply #34 on: May 09, 2013, 01:23:57 AM »

Personally, I use a capo a lot.

I play in many different keys, but use the capo for voicing purposes.
I have used several different types, especially the Shubb, G7, and my Paige.

I really love the Paige, with the ability to "store" it behind the nut when not in use, but alas, on my D-60 it will not stay behind the nut due to the beautiful volute carved into the base of the headstock. ...works great on the L-19.
The G7 seems bulky and somewhat uncomfortable on my fretting hand, but plays really great.
The Shubbs seem to fit some necks better than others... and I've had the rubber pad fall off during a show... quite an inconvience.


-harptech


 

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« Reply #35 on: May 09, 2013, 04:14:13 AM »

The issue gets more pronounced the higher up the capo is.

Here are pre- and post- pics of what happens when I do a bend on the G string (capo on 4th fret)...





This is the reason nuts are slotted.  I don't think that you can bend strings the proper amount, with the capo holding the string in the right place on the fretwire - it simply can't be done, IMO, without putting way too much downward pressure on the strings.

-Scott
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« Reply #36 on: May 09, 2013, 09:39:42 AM »

This is the reason nuts are slotted.  I don't think that you can bend strings the proper amount, with the capo holding the string in the right place on the fretwire - it simply can't be done, IMO, without putting way too much downward pressure on the strings.

-Scott

Bends while using my Shubb work just fine -- the strings return to their proper position and stay in tune. There is something very much amiss with this G7th capo. Perhaps, as others have stated, I just got a dud. Or maybe the rubber piece needs some break-in time. I don't know, but as it now stands this capo is pretty much worthless for me.
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« Reply #37 on: May 09, 2013, 02:51:17 PM »

Bends while using my Shubb work just fine -- the strings return to their proper position and stay in tune. There is something very much amiss with this G7th capo. Perhaps, as others have stated, I just got a dud. Or maybe the rubber piece needs some break-in time. I don't know, but as it now stands this capo is pretty much worthless for me.

I don't know about the G7th, but my Shubb has smoother rubber than my Kyser which allows the strings to slide back and forth a bit better.  I'm not much of a bender on acoustic so I can't really comment from much experience, but I would think that if all other things are equal (particularly pressure), a smoother, less"grippy" rubber would be better for bending.  But pressure will play a big role.
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« Reply #38 on: May 09, 2013, 05:19:23 PM »

JamesN
Hmmmm.  I am wondering if the problem is too much pressure on the stings with your capo, i.e. the capo is to tight and it will not allow the string to slide back into place after bending it???  The fact that it gets worse the higher up the fret board you go with the capo would kind of make this seem like a possibility.  With my capos, including the new Shubb I am now using, when you bend the string close to the capo the string actually slides on the capoed fret. In other words, the capo has to be set to allow this to happen as well as to allow the string to slide back into place.  A capo can not make the capoed fret work exactly like a nut due to the fact that the fret it is not filed like a nut,.
Dave
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« Reply #39 on: May 09, 2013, 07:03:41 PM »

JamesN
Hmmmm.  I am wondering if the problem is too much pressure on the stings with your capo, i.e. the capo is to tight and it will not allow the string to slide back into place after bending it???  The fact that it gets worse the higher up the fret board you go with the capo would kind of make this seem like a possibility.  With my capos, including the new Shubb I am now using, when you bend the string close to the capo the string actually slides on the capoed fret. In other words, the capo has to be set to allow this to happen as well as to allow the string to slide back into place.  A capo can not make the capoed fret work exactly like a nut due to the fact that the fret it is not filed like a nut,.
Dave

Dave,
Thanks for the feedback. I spent a couple hours experimenting last night (far more time than I've had to spend trying to get any other capo I've ever tried to work). I tried it on every fret from 1 to 7; tried attaching it from either the bass side or the treble; tried every combination of tension on the thumbscrew, from barely hanging on to gorilla-ed down as far as I dared. No joy in any scenario.

I used the term "bend" as a catch-all for what I'm experiencing, but really any technique that moves a string horizontally has this issue -- a strong vibrato or even an aggressive pull-off that pushes a string out of its default position results in the capo holding it right where it last landed.

At this point it's not worth any more of my time. I'm always willing to give new things a try, and I'm certainly not sorry I did. Other folks seem to think highly of the G7h, and that's just fine. But for me, it's back to my trusty Shubb.
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