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Author Topic: Capos  (Read 7096 times)
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« on: April 30, 2013, 05:37:10 AM »

 I use a capo some times and I hate all the ones I have ever owned.  They don't just change the key I am playing in but they all seem to significantly alter the volume and tone of my guitar.  What types of capos are people using that work best.
Dave
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« Reply #1 on: April 30, 2013, 05:55:55 AM »

This topic tends to come up on most guitar forums fairly regularly.   You will get several members who endorse one type and others who prefer something different altogether.

I don't know if there is any one capo that works best under all conditions with a variety of guitars.   Over the years I've used most of the popular ones at one time or another.
I now use two different ones:  A simple Keyser spring loaded one and a Planet Waves G7 ratchet-style.  They both work great but neither works best on all my guitars.
The capo that I thought would be the best one turned out not to work so great for me.  The "roller capo" that moves from one fret to another without removing it from the neck worked good on paper but not on my guitar fretboards.   Keep trying different ones.  There's bound to be one out there that will be suitable to your situation

There's lots of stuff on youtube regarding various capos as well

good luck.  hope you find what you're looking for

   
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ducktrapper
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« Reply #2 on: April 30, 2013, 12:24:36 PM »

I like the little Planet Waves NS capo. I have two of them. Light and easy to use. The G7 is nice too but mine feels too heavy.
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Queequeg
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« Reply #3 on: April 30, 2013, 01:06:16 PM »

Yes, you always have to check your tuning after you put a capo on the neck. They can pull your 6th [low E] string sharp, particularly if you more than 3 frets up.

I have 2 Shubbs, made for 12-strings because I like the extra width for the 1 & 13/16 and 1 & 7/8 necks.
I have two Kysers and they're nice because I can stick them on the headstock when not in use while performing.
And I have two Planet Waves NS which are the lightest and easiest.
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ducktrapper
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« Reply #4 on: April 30, 2013, 01:10:59 PM »

Yes, you always have to check your tuning after you put a capo on the neck. They can pull your 6th [low E] string sharp, particularly if you more than 3 frets up.

I have 2 Shubbs, made for 12-strings because I like the extra width for the 1 & 13/16 and 1 & 7/8 necks.
I have two Kysers and they're nice because I can stick them on the headstock when not in use while performing.
And I have two Planet Waves NS which are the lightest and easiest.

I dunno about Larrivees but after a Kyser turned my old Yamaha into a Ya aha, I've stopped putting them on headstocks. Advise care there.
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« Reply #5 on: April 30, 2013, 01:19:03 PM »

I dunno about Larrivees but after a Kyser turned my old Yamaha into a Ya aha, I've stopped putting them on headstocks. Advise care there.
Duly noted.  I have never left them up there for more than about 20 minutes.
What scares me most about these Kysers is if/when that spring fails, somebody is going to lose an eye.
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« Reply #6 on: April 30, 2013, 02:03:40 PM »

I have a Kyser Quick-Change and a Shubb Deluxe.  They both work very well.  I like the Shubb because I can set the amount of pressure which is important if you ever use it on electrics or with very light gauge strings.  I like the Kyser because it is quick and easy.  I've used other capos in the past, including this kind yak and I would say the key is how precise they are in terms of whatever adjustment they allow and how easily they can be positioned.  Some are really bad but most are usable.  It's important to get the position right if you want to avoid tuning problems.  As for volume and tone problems, I can't say I've experienced any of that unless the capo wasn't on properly.
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Gord

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« Reply #7 on: April 30, 2013, 10:35:25 PM »

I've liked the dunlop trigger capo. same idea as kyser, but a smaller profile and not as strong a spring. just enough to do the job on any guitar ive used it for.
tension-adjustable capos are nice , too, as they can be dialed in for string tensions across different instruments. helps keep intonation correct across all frets, etc.

Agreed about the volume and tone. have noticed it on every single capo ive ever used, on every guitar ive ever played, except those with a zero fret. i think its the open strings being over the steel of a fret instead of nut material that change the sound. the capo has less to do with it.
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« Reply #8 on: April 30, 2013, 10:51:23 PM »

From my perspective, the capo fretted string does not sound the same as the finger fretted string which sounds closer to the open string.  The capo fretted string always sounds somewhat dampened or muted somehow in terms of both volume and tone, a little like a poorly fretted string. I too am presently using Dunlop trigger capos and they are somewhat better but not by much from the other's I have used over the years.  There has to be a better mousetrap.
Dave
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« Reply #9 on: April 30, 2013, 11:09:49 PM »

There has to be a better mousetrap.
Dave

pencil and a rubber band?
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« Reply #10 on: April 30, 2013, 11:16:01 PM »

I'll try it!!  What hardness of pencil lead do you recommend.
Dave
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« Reply #11 on: April 30, 2013, 11:19:26 PM »

From my perspective, the capo fretted string does not sound the same as the finger fretted string which sounds closer to the open string.  The capo fretted string always sounds somewhat dampened or muted somehow in terms of both volume and tone, a little like a poorly fretted string.Dave
Hmm. No scientist here but what would make the difference. Pressure and density? The correct pressure,  texture, (for lack of a better word) and density to match fingers.
I've used shubbs forever. I like them because they are small and out of way on neck. They last forever. Do have to adjust screw sometimes when you move it around neck, but that only takes a second. Especially after using one a while. Just instinct.
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« Reply #12 on: May 01, 2013, 02:24:10 PM »

Hmm. No scientist here but what would make the difference. Pressure and density? The correct pressure,  texture, (for lack of a better word) and density to match fingers.
I've used shubbs forever. I like them because they are small and out of way on neck. They last forever. Do have to adjust screw sometimes when you move it around neck, but that only takes a second. Especially after using one a while. Just instinct.
  +1 on the Shubbs. I have one regular and one 12r, they work fine for me.
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« Reply #13 on: May 01, 2013, 03:00:42 PM »

I have to say that I haven't had anywhere near as much trouble using capoes as some people claim to have. Sometimes, you just have to fiddle with them a bit. A little adjustment? No big deal. 
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« Reply #14 on: May 01, 2013, 05:13:29 PM »

Many years ago, early 1960's I had a capo made of metal with a strip of cork to fret the strings.  Best capo I have ever used, but eventually the cork fell apart and I threw it out.  I haven't been able to find one like it. 
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« Reply #15 on: May 01, 2013, 08:36:39 PM »

From my perspective, the capo fretted string does not sound the same as the finger fretted string which sounds closer to the open string.  The capo fretted string always sounds somewhat dampened or muted somehow in terms of both volume and tone, a little like a poorly fretted string. I too am presently using Dunlop trigger capos and they are somewhat better but not by much from the other's I have used over the years.  There has to be a better mousetrap.
Dave

To me that sounds like part of the capo is in front of the fret - perhaps even just a tiny bit.  Make sure no part of the vibrating string is in contact with the capo.  It could also be that the capo is not applying enough pressure to the strings in order to firmly seat them on the fret.  Try pressing the capo down a little to see if that makes any difference.  Another cause could be that the capo is much too far back from the fret.  It should be as close as possible to the fret without going past.

Could you possibly post a close-up photo of the capo while on the guitar?  That might give us some insight.
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« Reply #16 on: May 02, 2013, 01:19:12 AM »

A key with any capo is to limit the amount of downward pressure put on the string behind the fret.  I actually try to get the bridge side of the rubber strip pressing directly on top of the fret so that the string is not being pulled sharp.  Also regarding breaking a keyser spring: I've done it and still have vision in both eyes. No flying parts ensued from the breakage. 
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« Reply #17 on: May 02, 2013, 02:12:03 AM »

Yep. You know you're supposed to do your fingers the same way, on top of fret, but usually easier said than done.
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« Reply #18 on: May 04, 2013, 05:03:21 AM »

Bought me a Shubb yesterday and so far I am impressed.  Will use it lots over the next few days and report back.  So far it is better than anything else I have used.
Dave
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« Reply #19 on: May 04, 2013, 06:40:45 AM »

I have VERY STRONG feelings on this matter, and here's why.

I've been a professional musician all my life, play 3 gigs this week-end.

I have owned every capo made. and I have 2 questions for anyone.

Q) what's the first thing you do when you put a capo on?
 A)tune your guitar

Q) the first thing you do when you take the capo off?
A) retune your guitar.

the ONLY capo I have EVER owned where I do NOT have this problem is  G7 capo.

NO tension, NO springs GUITar stays IN tune, ALL my guitars.
 
It's a WORRY FREE capo, especially doing a lot of live shows, or theatre gigs where you can't just stop the show to tune.

It's the most expensive capo you can buy, BT it provides worry free playing with-out even thinking about having to stop and tune.

I'm not affiliated with the company, when I first saw one I balked at the price, the store owner gave it to me for the week-end. I took it home and tried it on every guitar and in every difficult situation I could.
 It came through with better than flying colours.

Ok I'll shut up now, I KNOW some-one will disagree with me, and well they should...
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