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ducktrapper
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« on: November 20, 2018, 04:32:17 AM »

What would you call this chord on a ukulele? 2-O-O-5.  Am11? C6? I'm stumped.
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« Reply #1 on: November 20, 2018, 12:16:34 PM »

What would you call this chord on a ukulele? 2-O-O-5.  Am11? C6? I'm stumped.

C6/9 or D7sus2

https://ukulelehelper.com
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ducktrapper
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« Reply #2 on: November 22, 2018, 02:15:59 AM »

Thanks. 
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flatlander
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« Reply #3 on: November 25, 2018, 02:36:14 AM »

Theory wise it's not proper to call it an Am 11 because there's no flatted 7th and not proper to call it Am sus because it has a m3 BUT....
Functions well as an Am type chord so you could call it an Am add4.  Cool sounding chord. It's the same thing you end up with if you use double dropped D tuning and make an Am chord while letting the first string ring open (which is now a D) You can go to Dm for your IV chord next or it sounds cool to play a D chord with no 3rd in it next to keep that open, different sound going.
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ducktrapper
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« Reply #4 on: November 25, 2018, 02:15:18 PM »

Theory wise it's not proper to call it an Am 11 because there's no flatted 7th and not proper to call it Am sus because it has a m3 BUT....
Functions well as an Am type chord so you could call it an Am add4.  Cool sounding chord. It's the same thing you end up with if you use double dropped D tuning and make an Am chord while letting the first string ring open (which is now a D) You can go to Dm for your IV chord next or it sounds cool to play a D chord with no 3rd in it next to keep that open, different sound going.

All the reasons I was struggling to put a name to it. A beginning player, friend on Facebook, asked me what it would be. I went through all the "it could be this except for that" explanations I could come up with but theory, especially on a uke, is not my strong point. Thanks.  
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flatlander
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« Reply #5 on: November 27, 2018, 02:15:05 AM »

Yea, 7th, 9th, 11th, 13th chords are built off of dominant (b7) chords. Extensions.  People, internet, even books sometimes will call something like an open D chord with the 1st string open, a D9. It's really a D add2 or D+2 because there's no flatted 7th. D add 2 sounds much different than a D9. C6 sounds much different that a C13 even though the 6 and 13 are the same note, because 13th has b7 in it. Basically anything, any note you add to a chord, that doesn't fit your standard type notation, you call add (x)    
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ducktrapper
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« Reply #6 on: November 27, 2018, 06:20:16 PM »

 
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« Reply #7 on: November 27, 2018, 09:14:01 PM »

I use sites the ukulelehelper one (and others for guitar and mandolin, and keyboard) because I’m not a theory person.  Aren’t chord names dependent on the key a tune is in?  And, isnt it common for incomplete chords being used on most polyphonic instruments?

Ed
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ducktrapper
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« Reply #8 on: November 28, 2018, 02:15:07 AM »

I use sites the ukulelehelper one (and others for guitar and mandolin, and keyboard) because I’m not a theory person.  Aren’t chord names dependent on the key a tune is in?  And, isnt it common for incomplete chords being used on most polyphonic instruments?

Ed

Yes and all those things make it difficult to identify those types of chords. It would depend a lot on the key and the relationship between other chords in the piece. 
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flatlander
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« Reply #9 on: November 28, 2018, 02:35:54 AM »

Yes. Some chords depends what key you're in. Usually chords with extensions and depending which note you are calling the root or even implied root. Diminished chords can be named by ANY note in the chord because the intervals are the same between all the notes no matter which one you call the root. So those chords on Uke page are correct although I would tend to think the C chord should be called C6 add 2. The D7 sus 2 would be correct. Called a sus 2,not add 2 because the chord has no 3rd. Sus means you replace the 3rd with usually the 4th but sometimes the second. It just seems that chord Tom offered might get used most as an Am with a D thrown in. And yes to the second part. First off I use just 2 notes a lot and it takes 3 to be a chord. In that case if you cared to think of it in theory terms it would just be an interval. Same as one harmony singer adding a harmony note. (that's a good way to look at chords anyway, the root with harmonies added) Beyond that it's often impossible to play every note that would be in an extended chord so you drop some. Root is actually the first to go. Then the 5th. The ones you don't want to drop are the 3rd and 7th be they major or flatted. They identify the chord as major or minor in the 3rds case, or if it's dominant in the 7ths case. But when you drop the other notes the chord is still properly named if you include the 3rd and 7th. Now if I just knew how to use all these chords better I'd be good!  
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« Reply #10 on: November 28, 2018, 04:37:53 AM »

Helpful stuff...  just knowing *a name* for a chord (or the fingering) helps communicate with another player with the same instrument.  Knowing the *right* chord name helps communicate with other musicians.  For me.

Ed

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