Poll
Question: What guitar would you bring to a camp fire. There is no risk to the guitar.
Jumbo - 4 (5.3%)
Dreadnought - 19 (25%)
L-Body - 16 (21.1%)
LS (Larrivée Small) - 6 (7.9%)
OM - 11 (14.5%)
Classical - 1 (1.3%)
OOO - 3 (3.9%)
Parlor - 6 (7.9%)
Other - please specify - 10 (13.2%)
Total Voters: 52

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ST
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« Reply #40 on: August 10, 2011, 02:13:09 PM »

Hi Peachy,

Sorry to hear about the damage, but I can't attribute it to being in proximity to a campfire.

...

My decision not to take one of my better guitars proved a good one as the 214 came home with a 2" scratch on the lower bout. This was inflicted by a half-drunk bottle of Sauvignon that fell from our camp table against which the Taylor was leaning.

You lean guitars against tables?

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ST
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« Reply #41 on: August 10, 2011, 02:18:45 PM »

If you can accept however briefly, that situations like I described in the lead post can exist, then what guitar would you bring?

Maybe we could re-frame the setting and describe it this way.

An intimate concert for a group of up to 20 people, outdoors, without amplification.

You would be performing as either the lead voice in the song (guitar with or without vocal) and others may accompany you with guitar and voice.

OR

You might be an accompaniest to someone else who was taking the lead.

What guitar would you bring, and why?

Would your answer be different than previously? 


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Peachy
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« Reply #42 on: August 10, 2011, 02:23:32 PM »

Back on thread now - sorry!

Definitely my Larrivee J-05. The combination of tone and volume (outdoors to 20 people...) make it ideal. Also. the J-05 is equally at home being strummed or picked.
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« Reply #43 on: August 10, 2011, 03:00:42 PM »

My few experiences with playing outdoors with a fair number of people and without amplification leads me to believe you need to get as much volume out of the guitar as you can, and not worry about nuance. I voted Dread or 000, since those are undoubtedly my loudest.

I agree with d - I would have no problem taking a really nice guitar to a group setting with a bunch of other musicians I knew. That's exactly what they're for.  I would never consider taking it to a public setting and passing it around, though -
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« Reply #44 on: August 10, 2011, 03:04:20 PM »

If you can accept however briefly, that situations like I described in the lead post can exist, then what guitar would you bring?

Maybe we could re-frame the setting and describe it this way. An intimate concert for a group of up to 20 people, outdoors, without amplification.

You would be performing as either the lead voice in the song (guitar with or without vocal) and others may accompany you with guitar and voice.

OR

You might be an accompaniest to someone else who was taking the lead.

What guitar would you bring, and why?

Would your answer be different than previously? 

I would usually take my Dread in that situation...maybe a jumbo or SJ. Depends on my mood when I packed and which guitar had the best strings that day...

I take bigger guitars with the bigger voice.
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« Reply #45 on: August 10, 2011, 07:58:54 PM »

I agree with the comment you need volume outside. So: Guitar. Amp. Long extension cord. Generator.
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L-03 Italian Spruce
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« Reply #46 on: August 10, 2011, 08:29:57 PM »

If you can accept however briefly, that situations like I described in the lead post can exist, then what guitar would you bring?

Maybe we could re-frame the setting and describe it this way.

An intimate concert for a group of up to 20 people, outdoors, without amplification.

You would be performing as either the lead voice in the song (guitar with or without vocal) and others may accompany you with guitar and voice.

OR

You might be an accompaniest to someone else who was taking the lead.

What guitar would you bring, and why?

Would your answer be different than previously? 




No.  I'd still bring whichever guitar I wanted to play.  Parlor, OO, or Voyage Air Mini Dread. If the other players played too loud, I'd wait for another slot or another person to play with.

Ed
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ST
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« Reply #47 on: August 11, 2011, 07:19:58 AM »

Hi Ed

I'm glad that in this situation you would bring the parlor "my default guitar".  


I voted parlor and other.  For years, my Larrivee parlor (original issue plain Jane version) has been my default guitar.  I'm getting used to my OOV-03 and my Voyage Air VAMD-04, enough so that I might want to bring one of them too or instead.  The only thing that gets touchy at song circle type get togethers like the one you describe, are those people who want to show off their "cannon" or lack the self control to play *with* the other players and play too loud.  With the right bunch, that can be the most satisfying playing arrangement possible, for me at least.

Ed

When playing with a group I prefer to find like minded folks who believe that each player's role is to serve the song. I put this into practice this way:
If you can't hear the vocals, play softer (or stop playing)
If you and someone else are playing the same thing, then play something different (or stop playing).
Music needs holes to breathe. Let it breathe. If the music can't breathe, stop playing.
If you are not adding value to the song, then stop playing.

Some people agree with me about these ideas, and some don't. I don't tell people what to do but I'll share the ideas if someone asks.

I usually make a point of knowing what kinds of instruments will be at an event. I may know that because I know the guest list. I will usually bring something different.  If most are playing rosewood I'll bring something that will sound different.  Not louder... different.
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« Reply #48 on: August 11, 2011, 07:47:06 AM »

Hi JOYCEfromNS,

In my very early days playing acoustic guitar I formed the impression that the only authentic acoustic guitar was a Larrivée Rosewood L-body with a Florentine Cutaway. Today that would be a C09 or C10.

I voted for the L - as it can do it all and I find the most comfortable to play in any setting able to "keep up" with most everything. It's so versatile and fits ME so well. The L got my vote.
:
I had been playing for a over a year before I saw my first Larrivée.  It was a classical guitar. It didn't hold much interest for me aesthetically. The person who played it was another story (unrequited). A few months later I saw and heard THE Larrivée that became the standard against which all others would be measured.  Of all the guitars that I saw on a regular basis back then, it was THAT Larrivée that became imprinted on my psyche.  There  were Martins and Gibsons but none could hold my eye.

Back to the party...
I was certain that there would be plenty of steel-stringed dreadnaughts and grand concert and L-body sized guitars in various tonewoods, But for that, I might well have brought an L-body to the camp fire. Or perhaps more likely, I would have brought my Maple Morgan (that otherwise looks almost identical to a Larrivée C10), for the same reasons you mentioned: comfortable to play, it can always keep up, it's versatile, and it fits me.

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ST
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« Reply #49 on: August 11, 2011, 08:02:07 AM »

Hi unclrob,

When I first made up the options for the poll I completely forgot to include the LS body style. I saw one for the first time at the Forum III factory tour in March 2009. They are SO comfortable.

In that first version of the poll I also forgot to include Jumbo or 12-String.

I voted for the LS and the OM since those are the one's I have.I would have put down jumbo but my playing partner has taken control of it {for now} and the only other one I have is a jumbo 12 string which would just be a silly guitar to bring.

I don't know why a 12 String would be a silly guitar to bring.  I think that if you were playing sing-along songs a Jumbo would be a lot of fun.
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ST
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« Reply #50 on: August 11, 2011, 08:14:30 AM »

Hi Strings4Him,

What characteristics do these two different guitars bring to the party, and why do you think that these would be more appropriate at different stages of the party?


I chose dreadnought and parlor--dread for the beginning of the party and the parlor for when it winds down 

I had a flamed maple Parlor here short while ago, but it didn't stay long.  I'm sorry that it wasn't here for the comparisons.
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ST
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« Reply #51 on: August 11, 2011, 08:27:13 AM »

Hi again Ed,

Like good music!  I always say, if I can't play it, I don't need it.  If the situation is too dangerous for my guitar, it is too dangerous for me.  

YMMV.

Ed

I think that unless there is some significant attachment to a guitar, an instrument that is not being played is worthless to me. Conversely, the ones that get the most play time are priceless.

And I agree, if it's safe for me to go someplace, it's safe enough for one of my guitars. BUT we've been having uncommonly nice weather and it has been unseasonably warm.  I've been driving around a little rag-top that is old enough to pre-date crumple zones, air-bags and most modern safety features.  I would never travel with a guitar in the trunk of that car (or any car for that matter) so I've contemplated strapping my guitar into the passenger side.  There are no back seats. I've had visions of being in a crash and   watching a guitar case launched from the car, sailing up and out and down.   I haven't been able to go to a gig in that car unless I took the Yamaha SLG130NW Silent Guitar Classical. Now that I can strap in and be pretty certain that it would not go airborne.


Like good music!  I always say, if I can't play it, I don't need it.  If the situation is too dangerous for my guitar, it is too dangerous for me.  

YMMV.

Ed

That thought crosses my mind as my dire imaginings put me in a speeding ambulance  pointing with a frail finger back to the crash site mumbling weakly, "my guitar... my guitar".
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Barefoot Rob
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« Reply #52 on: August 11, 2011, 01:59:35 PM »

ST the only reason I think bring a 12 string of any body style style would be tuning issue.With a bunch of guitarist playing any guitar even the slight bit out of tune might drive people crazy.A 12 string needs to be perfectly tuned and as we all know hearing is always an issue,so most people will play harder to themselfs,thus causing people to strum harder which in some case's will cause a guitar to go out of tune,etc,etc,etc....
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« Reply #53 on: August 11, 2011, 02:41:24 PM »

Hi dermot,

having had the chance to meet a few of ST's friends, i would not be slightest bit worried about damage.. so if it was me, i would take my D-18.. if i was in ST shoes, i might have placed the D42 (if you still have it) in the back seat of the car for the evening.. the pearl looks so sparkely in firelight ;-)
I'm sure a D-18 would have fit in well.  My Martin is a D41.  I had not even the slightest notion about bracing when I got it. It just spoke to me at the time.  It records nicely and yes, it's pretty by firelight.

Quote
And i also subscribe to the theory "if it's too precious to play anywhere i want, anytime i want - then i don't own it, it owns me...
I do too - but I have become more picky about "anywhere i want". But back in the days when I was just getting into electric blues  I went through a bunch of guitars as I hit every blues jam I could find. Remember to the days when you could find one or two jams sessions on just about any day of the week?

I took something new and shiny to the Yale one Sunday and after my set the lead guitarist in the house band gently pulled me aside and said, "There's people around here who would just as soon kill you as look at you to get their hands on that guitar".  When I naively asked why, he explained that the guitar could be sold in minutes to feed a habit.  So the issue was not about harm coming to the guitar, but to the fool who didn't perceive the surroundings.



Quote
My story;

Three weeks ago i was hanging out on the Sunshine coast, a friend owns a studio up there.

After dinner he got a fire going in his firepit. I brought my Webber RoundBody for the weekend, and he has a Guild f20 that i own in his studio, his wife was playing her Banjo, and another friend was playing a '49 000-18.

One thing in common is that all the guitars are very lightly built and somewhat fragile, from the feather weight '61 Guild, the just postwar Martin (that's the only year they were made with taper braces like Larrivee uses) and the Webber has a cedar top and is the lightest rosewood guitar i have ever held

All of my friends were former pro's, have gold records and all that stuff stashed somewhere, and no one cares about any of that... a great dinner, conversation, all of us are dry & sober now, so no wine consumed, no smokeables consumed.. just music and talk....


Was great evening.. i'm sure ST's turned out just as well....

d


Any time you need a 'plus one',...

Seriously... dude!
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ST
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« Reply #54 on: August 11, 2011, 03:03:50 PM »

Hi Michael,

I voted Dread & other, someone left off 12 strings so I guess other would be the choice to make.


That was me - I left 12-strings off the list. I had one for 15 years and it only came out around Festivus so I dusted it off last year and sent it on its way. I would have done well at the camp fire though. Sorry about the omission.

You must be better at tuning yours than unclrob is with his or maybe you subscribe to the theory, "Iffin it'sa little outta tune then I just sounds like more people".
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« Reply #55 on: August 11, 2011, 03:11:20 PM »

Well, here's the thing. It's possible to have a "beater" that's a teriffic little guitar. I bring my FG-180 not because it's not  a nice guitar but because it is and  although I would actually hate to lose it, it's capable, should things turn out poorly, of taking a licking a keeping right on ticking. While, it would be difficult to find a new place to scratch it, for instance, it sounds and plays like a much more expensive, better looking instrument. I wouldn't be embarrassed to play it in any  situation, come to think of it. Even beside the prewar Martins and fancy other things.    
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« Reply #56 on: August 11, 2011, 03:11:58 PM »

Hi Kurt  (L07 Shooting Star),

I voted Other and L-body.  The L-07, because that's what I have, and it sounds soooo nice plus I've played it so long, it just feels like it belongs if you know what I mean.  I haven't really played most of the other models much except for a few minutes in music stores so can't really say if I would bring one of those if I had one.

The Other, because I now have a Norman B20 dreadnaught with a solid cedar top and laminated cherry back and sides that I am very proud of.  I bought it for 30 dollars about 6 months ago with some cracks in the somewhat bellied top, and poor action as a result.  I have "fixed" it now, and it plays and sounds great.  I made a new nut and saddle for it from deer antler.  Because the neck attaches with two long screws from the back and has 2 "tilt adjustment" allen screws at the last fret that you adjust through the top of the fingerboard, I was able to "reset" the neck to compensate for the dip around the soundhole.  I also made a new pickguard for it from a piece of redwood burl veneer and attached it with carpet tape.  There was a bad gouge in the top on the bass side of the upper bout which a patched with a piece of cedar shingle.  However, this didn't look good at all so I made it obvious by engraving a little sun graphic on it.  I replaced one of the tuners which I got gratis from GA-ME (many thanks for that).  I also "improved" the finish on the top with a few coats of shellac right on top of the old finish.  

The main reason I would bring the Norman is to show it and my "repair skills" off and because it is actually easier to play than my L-07 so is more versatile in some ways plus easier to play barre chords on.  I believe I would get lots of comments on it if I brought it and it would be a good converstation starter.  It's not a "looker" (kinda like a wolf in sheeps clothing) and anyone who's tried it have been very impressed.

A couple of before and after pics....................  The cracks still show but they are now glued shut and/or filled with cedar shingle strips.
Kurt



A storied guitar is a wonderful addition to a gathering of aficianados. I like that yours has that sunspot, a beauty mark that could easily spark a conversation.  

In many cases I'll take playability over tone if I have to make a choice.  Sounds like your Norman is a player.
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ST
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« Reply #57 on: August 11, 2011, 06:03:10 PM »

Hi Dotneck,

I've often considered getting a campfire / beach / beater  guitar and when I get into that mindset I try out this or that. I haven't found a guitar that I enjoy playing that I wouldn't "care if it gets damaged or stolen."

I bought a Takamine for $125 for my campfire guitar. That way I don't care if it gets damged or stolen. If I get drunk and forget to bring it home I won't worry. Outside around a fire great tone doesn't matter and the Takamine plays just fine.

I leave my Larrivees and Gibsons at home.

One of my motives in starting this discussion was to hear peoples' opinions about tone, sharing music in an intimate outdoor environment.

That's why I recorded those sound samples and this back to back example of a Classical  and a Jumbo at a distance.
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« Reply #58 on: August 11, 2011, 10:59:08 PM »

"Beater".

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Barefoot Rob
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« Reply #59 on: August 12, 2011, 02:09:35 AM »

Tom Great beater and beer shot.
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