Poll
Question: What guitar would you bring to a camp fire. There is no risk to the guitar.
Jumbo - 4 (5.3%)
Dreadnought - 19 (25%)
L-Body - 16 (21.1%)
LS (Larrivée Small) - 6 (7.9%)
OM - 11 (14.5%)
Classical - 1 (1.3%)
OOO - 3 (3.9%)
Parlor - 6 (7.9%)
Other - please specify - 10 (13.2%)
Total Voters: 52

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eded
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« Reply #20 on: August 08, 2011, 03:10:35 PM »

I bought a Takamine for $125 for my campfire guitar. That way I don't care if it gets damged or stolen. If I get drunk and forget to bring it home I won't worry. Outside around a fire great tone doesn't matter and the Takamine plays just fine.


Do you leave the orig. strings on and only use broken picks around a campfire, too?  You wouldn't want to bring your good strings and picks.   

Ed
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ducktrapper
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« Reply #21 on: August 08, 2011, 03:34:01 PM »

Do you leave the orig. strings on and only use broken picks around a campfire, too?  You wouldn't want to bring your good strings and picks.   

Ed

Well yes, let's hear it for those gentle, civilized adults who bring their "prewar" Martins to bonfires!   
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« Reply #22 on: August 08, 2011, 05:40:08 PM »

Hi Folks,

Thanks for participating in the poll.

This morning I did some quick and dirty recordings for you.  There are two tracks for each guitar. Both tracks are things that I played at the camp fire party - shortened to under a minute each. I spared you the vocals.

The easiest way that I've found to switch back and forth and listen is to right click on a link below and choose - "Open in new window".  Then arrange the window in which you are viewing the list (this window) on one side of the screen, and open the Reverbnation player window on the other side of the screen. The use your mouse to drag a link from this window to the Reverbnation player window.

If this works for you as it does for me, you will be able to switch back and forth pretty easily.


Guitar 1
Campfire 01
Campfire 02

Guitar 2
Campfire 03
Campfire 04

Guitar 3
Campfire 05
Campfire 06

Guitar 4
Campfire 07
Campfire 08

Guitar 5
Campfire 09
Campfire 10

Guitar 6
Campfire 11
Campfire 12

I'll post the identities of the guitars in another thread (Camp Fire guitars revealed) so that you can look whenever you feel like looking and I'll spare you the mystery. But I don't want to spoil things for those who would prefer to listen without knowing.  (Blind Melon Chitlin' Taste Test).

Technical details:  I just got a Roland / Boss Micro BR BR-80 and I just set this up about 18 inches away from me and hit record.  The room in which I did this is really dry (very little natural reverb).  There are no effects or post-processing in these recordings.  The recording level is set manually, and is the same for all the tracks.  I recorded the tracks as wav files and then reduced them to mp3s at 192 kbps.  If I had read the manual first, I could have skipped the conversion and recorded directly as mp3 files. I'll do that next time.

I tried to play all the tracks the same way, but you know how hard it is to do that.

I'll match up the guitars with the recordings in another post, but if you are curious - in alphabetical order (not the order of the listings above) ... you are hearing


Larrivée C-10B
Larrivée C-38
Larrivée LS-05
Larrivée OMV-10KK
Martin D41
Morgan Concert Cutaway (identical to C10 except it's Maple back and sides)

I'll post a link to what is what in another post in a minute.



In the meantime - have fun.




Here's a link to the recording with the guitars identified.  Camp Fire guitars revealed.
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Dotneck
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« Reply #23 on: August 08, 2011, 08:23:30 PM »

Do you leave the orig. strings on and only use broken picks around a campfire, too?  You wouldn't want to bring your good strings and picks.   

Naw...picks are cheap. I may leave my Red Bear pick at home so I don't loose it and take a couple stubbies with me....and strings are consumables.  But regarding guitars...my beaters go to campfires...and the good guitars stay home ($1000-2000)
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« Reply #24 on: August 09, 2011, 06:15:13 AM »

I answered the poll based on the original premise that any guitar one brought would not be at risk in any way.  Perhaps the scenario is not realistic, but I think the intent was to discover what participants would consider to be the most suitable guitar in such a hypothetical situation and why.

I imagine most of us would want to bring our "best" guitar if it was in no danger of any kind.  Why not?  What a perfect chance to play and show off the guitar that sounds and plays the best and helps us perform our best in front of an appreciative group.  Seems to me it would be a shame if the only time we get to play these prized instruments is for ourselves in our own homes or some such "safe" environment while trying to convey in words or by posting nice pictures to everyone else how wonderful they are.

Of course, we wouldn't bring our prized valuable guitars to a real-life typical campfire situation.  For example, I wouldn't bring my L-07, I would bring the Norman.  But the scenario and participating group presented was maybe not typical for many of us.  I don't see that as justification to mock it though.
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« Reply #25 on: August 09, 2011, 11:08:52 AM »

I answered the poll based on the original premise that any guitar one brought would not be at risk in any way.  Perhaps the scenario is not realistic, but I think the intent was to discover what participants would consider to be the most suitable guitar in such a hypothetical situation and why.

I imagine most of us would want to bring our "best" guitar if it was in no danger of any kind.  Why not?  What a perfect chance to play and show off the guitar that sounds and plays the best and helps us perform our best in front of an appreciative group.  Seems to me it would be a shame if the only time we get to play these prized instruments is for ourselves in our own homes or some such "safe" environment while trying to convey in words or by posting nice pictures to everyone else how wonderful they are.

Of course, we wouldn't bring our prized valuable guitars to a real-life typical campfire situation.  For example, I wouldn't bring my L-07, I would bring the Norman.  But the scenario and participating group presented was maybe not typical for many of us.  I don't see that as justification to mock it though.

I still say, I'd bring whatever guitar I wanted to play.  In fact, I do bring whatever guitar I am currently playing to any place I'm going to play.  If I'm not playing a guitar regularly, or think I'd be uncomfortable taking the guitar anywhere, I don't need it.  If it is a place I'm uncomfortable taking a guitar, I probably don't need (or want) to go there.  I go to plenty "typical" campfires.  There is always plenty beer, kids are usually running around, there is food.  There is loud singing and revelry.  if we get lucky, there is naked dancing.  If I have a guitar I can't bring, why bother owning it? 

I agree that the tone of the guitar doesn't matter...  to the other participants.  It does to me.  When I either start to play for the other people or stop caring what the guitar sounds like, maybe it'll be time for me to take up another instrument, or just give up.

Fwiw, I feel the same about playing in bars.  If i don't feel safe bringing my guitar (regardless of the one I chose), it is undoubtedly a bar I don't need to play in.  NONE of my guitars is a princess.  I got them to make music, not sit and admire.

Ed
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« Reply #26 on: August 09, 2011, 01:55:18 PM »

Of course, we wouldn't bring our prized valuable guitars to a real-life typical campfire situation. 

I take my 000-60 anywhere I play.
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« Reply #27 on: August 09, 2011, 02:47:35 PM »


Of course, we wouldn't bring our prized valuable guitars to a real-life typical campfire situation.  For example, I wouldn't bring my L-07 ...

But I can tell you from much experience that the L-07 is a great 'real-life' campfire guitar 

cheers,
andrew
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Andrew J.
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« Reply #28 on: August 09, 2011, 02:49:46 PM »

I answered the poll based on the original premise that any guitar one brought would not be at risk in any way.  Perhaps the scenario is not realistic, but I think the intent was to discover what participants would consider to be the most suitable guitar in such a hypothetical situation and why.

I guess I don't understand the premise so I answered wrong. To me a campfire situations include areas of extreme heat and cool damp areas. Extreme bright and very dark areas. Since its outside with a fire...humidity is varied but mostly dry. Areas that host campfires usually don't have a place to store a guitar temporarily while its not being used. Its outside so its easy for the sound to get lost and covered up by the crackling fire and laughing talking campers.

But the original premise is that the guitar will not be at risk in any way...so I need to imagine that none of those potential damaging conditions exist except maybe the outside acoustics problems...so I will want something loud so I vote for a dreadnaught. If we can imagine that there will also be good acoustics at this campfire then I might bring a 00.


I go to plenty "typical" campfires.  There is always plenty beer, kids are usually running around, there is food.  There is loud singing and revelry.  if we get lucky, there is naked dancing.  If I have a guitar I can't bring, why bother owning it?  

I guess my mind doesn't work the same way. I bet 95% of my playing is in a place I feel comfortable with my guitars. But I don't choose a guitar because its appropriate for the 5% of times that I might use it...I choose it for the vast majority of my applications. I can make due with something else in those other rare occasions...

I get my guitars to make music too, but I also admire their delicate beauty.
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« Reply #29 on: August 09, 2011, 03:08:49 PM »

I haven't been to a campfire since high school and guitar playing wasn't on my mind. whistling
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« Reply #30 on: August 09, 2011, 03:14:42 PM »

I haven't been to a campfire since high school and guitar playing wasn't on my mind. whistling

Getting your marshmellow roasted just right?


 afro
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« Reply #31 on: August 09, 2011, 03:30:32 PM »

Hi Everyone,

Thanks for participating.

The situation I described in the lead post was real (repeated below). It was what I encountered when I arrived at the party. The people were the core of a musical community who have been meeting every Thursday night to play music since 1980. They have met in various venues over the years but there is usually a stage, sound system, seating and a devoted audience.

The people who go there include local working musicians who happen not to have a gig on a Thursday.  Many got their start on a Thursday night at these events.  I get there from time to time; not often enough. The people in the audience are avid, supportive listeners who are regulars at many of the other live-music venues in that area. There is a steady in-flow of new people of all ages but the people who return are those who understand what it's about: the music. 

I've known these people for decades. I was pretty sure about what I would find when I arrived.

The Setting
The setting is a gentle, civilized party of adults. Most of the people there are guitarists and the folks who travel with them.  Some are singer-songwriters. Some are those who like to accompany singer-songwriters.  There is no concern for the physical safety of the instrument. The temperature is moderate, there is no wind, no sparks, no flying embers, no flaming marshmallows or excessive smoke.  

Players will likely be taking-turns with others accompanying whoever is playing. There may be some sing-along.

What guitar would you bring?  Why?  

Please post and tell us why you would bring what you would bring if you could bring anything. There is no requirement that you actually own the guitars that get your votes.


Non-essential back-story:

Last night I got a last minute invitation to go to an outdoor party. A camp fire was to be the centre-piece of the event in a huge back yard in a supportive residential area. The neighbours would be at the party.  

I had an early evening gig and I knew that I wouldn't get to the party until after 10:30-11:00. I was playing my virtual guitar rig (electric) at the gig and I knew that wouldn't fly at the party so the big question: "What to bring to the camp fire"  I pictured a modest fire, nothing too noisy. There would be maybe a dozen or twenty folks sitting around glowing embers and soft flames. Given the temperatures lately, it would be about 65-70 degrees.

There were small groups of people chatting in areas near by: Maybe fifty people all told.  Those who wanted to listen or sing or play along would join the camp fire.

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« Reply #32 on: August 09, 2011, 07:23:03 PM »

Who voted for Classical?  Which classical do you have?

Do you have other guitars?



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« Reply #33 on: August 09, 2011, 08:27:08 PM »

For those who think that a steel stringed guitar is louder than a classical here is an interesting discussion:

Classical Guitar Volume  (thread on Acoustic Guitar Forum)
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« Reply #34 on: August 09, 2011, 09:46:54 PM »

Classical or Jumbo

Just for fun I did a quickie recording with the same  Roland / Boss Micro BR BR-80 that I used for the earlier recordings.  I put the recorder 12 feet from where I was playing. This time I had to crank up the recording level a bit.

I thought you might be interested to hear a comparison considering that I is relatively easy to assume that the Jumbo would be louder than the Classical.

This was at 12 feet. No effects, one take (hence the pause as I switched guitars).  The space in very quiet and there is almost no room reverb.
Sorry for all the flubs. I haven't played that Jumbo in months - (we're listening for tone and volume comparisons I hope).  It was really interesting to switch back and forth between these two instruments (neck sizes so different, as were the body shapes and the overal experience of playing them).

Classical C38 then J10 and then back to C38

0:00 to 0:45 is the Classical
0:50 to 2:35 is the Jumbo
2:38 to 3:36 is the Classical again



So which of these would you have taken to this camp fire.
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« Reply #35 on: August 10, 2011, 02:55:30 AM »

Either one would be great but I must admit that I really love how Larrivee classicals play and sound,wish I keeped the one I had.It went to an old high school friend who had a breakdown of sorts,she had such a feel and talent.She came into Tally to visit her ex husband also a friend from high shool,She stopped by with him and though she hadn't played in years she picked it up and both her and the guitar came alive,it was like they became one.I loaned it to her while she was in town and at the end of the week I told her that it was time for her to get back to were she belonged and that the guitar belong to her.She visits every year for a week and baby come's along.She plays in the park during lunch for tips and says she thinks she could get back to were she belongs soon.She was a top notch performance major at the U of Miami and if it wasn't for a major brain fart{her words not mine} she would have been up there with the greats in the classical guitar performance today.Just the most lovely women I've ever had the pleasure to know.
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« Reply #36 on: August 10, 2011, 03:52:42 AM »

  I chose LS and 00. Truly the 00 is best for me to pack around. We are taking some time off starting tomorrow (just 3 days) and I'll be taking my 00 with me for sure.
Then maybe my OM-21. That way I'll have a mahogany and a rosewood, a 12 fret and a 14 fret to cover all the bases.

   I guess I should add, if I thought there may be a problem of any nature that may cause damage to my guitar, it would be my 000 RK. $275 is a lot easier to accept a loss on than some of these others. Plus no attachment to it like the Larris or the OM-21.
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« Reply #37 on: August 10, 2011, 07:18:35 AM »

But I can tell you from much experience that the L-07 is a great 'real-life' campfire guitar 
cheers,
andrew
Andrew, I agree with you 100% and I should qualify my statement about not bringing mine.  For the first twenty years or so that I've had it, my L-07 was the only guitar I owned and I must have played it in "campfire" or similiar outdoor situations at least 100 times.  Being unaware of some of the potential damage, or even just ignoring that issue, I just took it because that was my guitar.  What amazes me now in hindsight is that it has stood up so well in spite of all that.  Of course, I didn't mistreat it and tried not to bang it on something or let the sparks hit it or whatever, but I also didn't baby it.  I have left it outside overnight in the grass, or leaning against a tree, or the tent trailer perhaps, a few times at least.  I feel lucky that it is still in such good condition since I could have done some serious damage to it, I suppose.  So now that I know better,  I would be a lot more careful about using it in such circumstances especially since I have a "beater" to use instead.  Most of the time, the rest of the group wouldn't have appreciated the difference anyways since I was usually the only guitarist in the mix.

So I guess what I would really do nowadays would be to bring the L-07 along with the beater, leave it in the car in it's case, assess the situation, and maybe bring it out if I thought it would be safe to do so.  And I agree with those of you who say, why have a guitar that isn't going to be played.
 
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« Reply #38 on: August 10, 2011, 01:45:33 PM »

 I reached a compromise (of sorts....) at the last two folk festivals I went to. Knowing that me and my friends have a propensity to play (and drink!) into the wee hours around the tents, I took my Taylor 214e. This gives me a reasonably loud guitar with plenty of top end and sufficient boom in the bass strings. It's also  my only 'beater' having been 'stolen' from a non-player on EBay for £400 (trust me - that's cheap in the UK!).
Well... I do have my old EKO but hey, there's no street cred in that 

My decision not to take one of my better guitars proved a good one as the 214 came home with a 2" scratch on the lower bout. This was inflicted by a half-drunk bottle of Sauvignon that fell from our camp table against which the Taylor was leaning. I'm not at all upset by this, although I would have been sad if it had been another guitar. The 214 now has some character and some stories to tell. Lastly, my 214 is a 2005 (last of the solid woods models before Mexico and laminate!) and has a satin finish. Ideal for collecting signatures/autographs - not got any yet but going to try Richard Thompson (Fairport), Kate Rusby and Donovan later this summer.....................
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« Reply #39 on: August 10, 2011, 01:53:57 PM »


So which of these would you have taken to this camp fire.

the classical... love the tone... sounds like a summer night in Andelucia...

d
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