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Author Topic: 12 Fret Necks -why So Scarce?  (Read 1006 times)
Fingertwister
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« on: January 06, 2004, 12:38:30 PM »

Now that I have the experience of owning & playing two 12-fretters (a parlor & a 00), I'm curious as to why more players haven't opted for the tonal improvement that a 12-fret neck bestows; after all, ALL Nationals (except cutaways) are built so,so why are there so relatively few wooden 12s?Is it because few people get to try them? Just curious..
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GIGGLER
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« Reply #1 on: January 06, 2004, 04:32:43 PM »

I don't know the answer, but may I add the 12 fretter I have is great for lowered alternate tunings!
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guitarmanfsu
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« Reply #2 on: January 07, 2004, 05:00:22 AM »

Dunno... the only thing that comes to mind is fret access, but thinking further on that point I know the majority of my guitar-playing friends are rhythm players, they don't do anything past the sixth or seventh fret.  I work at the same store unclrob does, we've still got several parlours there, all 12-fretters, and I flat love 'em.  Fun to play, great tone, and like Giggler said, awesome for alternate tunings.  Of course, I feel that way about all Larrivees, but the parlours are just stinkin' fun.  Maybe people are just more used to the 14-fret designs, they're made a lot more than 12-fretters from what I've seen anymore.
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Fingertwister
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« Reply #3 on: January 07, 2004, 09:32:40 AM »

Indeed so: perhaps it will turn out to be like 000's - 20 years ago, dreads dominated the market & 000s were relatively scarce, then players gradually woke up to the more balanced tone of the 000; maybe they'll eventually catch on to the ergonomic/tonal advantages of these lil babies - after all, most of the great prewar blues classics were recorded on such guitars..
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JasonA
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« Reply #4 on: January 07, 2004, 05:18:11 PM »

I love the 12-fretters. Although I did kind of go overboard. As of the beginning of this week I owned 4 12-fret guitars! That is a bit much so I'm selling some, but everyone should have at least one.   ;)

Shameless plug... less than 2 days left on this auction of a very nice 12-fret 00.
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewI...item=2370381953  
 
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dr461
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« Reply #5 on: January 12, 2004, 01:18:42 AM »

I LOVE smaller guitars.  I rarely find myself playing the "dreads" as of recent.  Lately, I have been playing the Larrivees a lot, and love the walnut parlor.  I also just got a Martin 000 size ( a SWOMGT) on E-bay, and it is due to arrive next week.  So, I concur with regard to smaller axes---especially Larrivees, Taylors, and I hope, the new Martin.
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