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Author Topic: Your 2010 Album of The Year  (Read 5236 times)
jeremy3220
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« Reply #40 on: January 04, 2011, 10:51:23 PM »

Ya'll are crazy, 2010 ushered in the most important music movement in history. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hMtZfW2z9dw
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BenF
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« Reply #41 on: January 04, 2011, 10:58:30 PM »

Genius.
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« Reply #42 on: January 04, 2011, 11:26:49 PM »

Finally something with autotune that didn't make me laugh in disgust!!! bowdown bowdown
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Walkerman
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« Reply #43 on: January 05, 2011, 02:41:00 AM »

I guess the ? is, is that a girly boy, or, a chick with a goatee?
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ducktrapper
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« Reply #44 on: January 05, 2011, 01:25:44 PM »

I will take this opportunity to apologize to all young people for having all the good music made in our generation and leaving you with the dregs of rap, hip-hop and redo. Sorry. It was the times. My new years resolution is to ignore new music until like Walkerman suggests it is so good it runs up and bites me on the a$$.   
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GA-ME
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« Reply #45 on: January 05, 2011, 01:44:47 PM »

I will take this opportunity to apologize to all young people for having all the good music made in our generation and leaving you with the dregs of rap, hip-hop and redo. Sorry. It was the times. My new years resolution is to ignore new music until like Walkerman suggests it is so good it runs up and bites me on the a$$.   

LOL X Infinity!
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BenF
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« Reply #46 on: January 05, 2011, 03:12:16 PM »

Yeah yeah, funny. Rap and hip-hop is a waste of air, I'll admit that.

I apologise for being young, and having my own teeth/hair/bladder control etc.
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Ben
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ducktrapper
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« Reply #47 on: January 05, 2011, 03:37:30 PM »

Yeah yeah, funny. Rap and hip-hop is a waste of air, I'll admit that.

I apologise for being young, and having my own teeth/hair/bladder control etc.

Yeah well your timie will come. My bladder control is exemplary, however. 
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Walkerman
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« Reply #48 on: January 05, 2011, 04:14:45 PM »

I will take this opportunity to apologize to all young people for having all the good music made in our generation and leaving you with the dregs of rap, hip-hop and redo. Sorry. It was the times. My new years resolution is to ignore new music until like Walkerman suggests it is so good it runs up and bites me on the a$$.   


Technical question...what constitutes "new music?"

Does Robert Plant's new album qualify as "new music" or, is there an artist age threshold?  What if some previously unknown Motzart concertos were discovered and recorded...would that be considered as "new music?"  Or, does "new music" refer only to music from unknown artists.  I need to know the ground rules...
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ducktrapper
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« Reply #49 on: January 06, 2011, 03:18:11 PM »

New music is music presented recently. It is not necessarily "new" sounding but is newly released. So Band of Joy is new music but Robert Plant is not a new artist. New music by new artists that sounds new and different is the grand search that people like me have been on for 50 years. 2010? I just gave up. I liked Band of Joy but I can't say I couldn't have done without it. If things like Vampire Weekend or any of the below are of consequence, either as novel, groundbreaking or particularly clever, it plum evaded me. Here's Billboard's Top Ten for 2010. I'll concede it's necessary to look deeper than Billboard but I haven't the patience considering the poverty of all the played out mines.
Every critic is raving about Kanye West but if it's not correct to use the n-word then I won't listen to him do it either. Besides he strikes me as an unbearable creep. There should be about 10,000,000 of these in the used CD section or Good Will store soon.

Still, every once in a while, someone will put the old musical legos (and logos) together in a way that pleases the hell out of me. It's all love and theft.    
As Dylan also said, "Businessmen they drink my wine, plowmen dig my earth. None of them along the line, know what any of it is worth."

Billboard Top 10
1.My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy by Kanye West
2.The Suburbs by Arcade Fire
3.Body Talk by Robyn
4.Sigh No More by Mumford & Sons
5.Teen Dream by Beach House
6.This Is Happening by LCD Soundsystem
7.Thank Me Later by Drake
8.Congratulations by MGMT
9.Teflon Don by Rick Ross
10.Sir Lucious Left Foot: The Son of Chico Dusty by Big Boi

Rolling Stone:
1.My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy by Kanye West
2.Brothers by The Black Keys
3.The Union by Elton John and Leon Russell
4.The Suburbs by Arcade Fire
5.The Guitar Song by Jamey Johnson
6.Contra by Vampire Weekend
7.Thank Me Later by Drake
8.Band of Joy by Robert Plant
9.Recovery by Eminem
10.This Is Happening by LCD Soundsystem

Spin:
1.My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy by Kanye West
2.Halcyon Digest by Deerhunter
3.The Suburbs by Arcade Fire
4.This Is Happening by LCD Soundsystem
5.The Guitar Song by Jamey Johnson
6.The ArchAndroid by Janelle Monáe
7.Grinderman II by Grinderman
8.Maya by M.I.A.
9.Man On The Moon II: The Legend Of Mr. Rager by Kid Cudi
10.Body Talk Pt. 1 by Robyn
 
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dkoloff
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« Reply #50 on: January 06, 2011, 03:48:44 PM »

Jamey Johnson
Justin Townes Earle
Arcade Fire
Dierks Bentley
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Walkerman
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« Reply #51 on: January 06, 2011, 05:52:33 PM »

Just for a fun comparison, here's the top 15 albums for the year of 1970 (that's 1 year, not the decade)

1.  Bridge Over Troubled Water   Simon and Garfunkle
2.  Led Zepplin II                          Led Zepplin
3.  Chicago                                   Chicago
4.  Abbey Road                             Beatles (yes, just number 4)
5.  Santana                                   Santana
6.  Get Ready                                Rare Earth
7.  Easy Rider                                Orig. soundtrack
8.  Butch Cassidy                           Orig. soundtrack
9.  Joe Cocker                               Joe Cocker
10.Captured Live                           3 Dog Night
11.Deja Vu                                    Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young
12.Willie and the Poor Boys          Creedence Clearwater Revival
13.Blood Sweat and Tears            Blood Sweat and Tears
14.Hair                                         Original Cast
15.Sweet Baby James                  James Taylor

Oh, yeah....you could say we were spoiled            

Then, just to prove it wasn't a fluke, 1971 followed with....


1. All Things Must Pass -                 George Harrison
2. Chicago III -                               Chicago
3. Close To You -                            Carpenters  
4. Every Picture Tells a Story -        Rod Stewart
5. Greatest Hits -                             Sly & The Family Stone  
6. Jesus Christ Superstar -              Soundtrack
7. Love Story -                                Soundtrack
8. Mud Slide Slim                             James Taylor
9. The Partridge Family Album -      The Partridge Family
10.Pearl -                                        Janis Joplin
11.Shaft -                                       Soundtrack
12.Sticky Fingers -                          The Rolling Stones
13.Tapestry -                                 Carole King
14.Tea for the Tillerman -                 Cat Stevens


              
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BenF
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« Reply #52 on: January 06, 2011, 06:24:11 PM »

I have never , and will never, judge the quality of music by record sales and or journalists top whatever lists.  The very thought of music being good because someone else tells you it is is perverse.

I'm not trying to start another argument by the way, I don't think that is what you were trying to say. Including lists will, however, insinuate it by their very nature.

I agree that those lists contain some essential records, but also some less impressive releases.

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Ben
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« Reply #53 on: January 06, 2011, 06:30:11 PM »

Yes a very impressive list indeed and there were others of that year that could be added as were very very  solid albums like John PHILLIPS solo album of that year was amazing and also ZZ Top debut album from that year before the Santa beards, pimpin’ rides, sexy ladies, and MTV videos  they were once an honest to goodness – and damned impressive – Blues band with a capital B. Could probably name another dozen or so that were also album staples.

Gotta wonder tho if a 15 to 20 year old today feels as passionate about this years music offerings. I'm guessing YES!!!!!  
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Walkerman
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« Reply #54 on: January 06, 2011, 06:34:01 PM »

Then, in 1972 we were treated to Neil Young's Harvest, Exile on Main Street, Curtis Mayfield's Superfly, Stevie Wonder's Talking Book, Lor Reed's Transformer,  Ziggy Stardust, Paul Simon's solo (1st), Denver's Rocky Mountian High, debut albums by Loggins and Messina as well as America and the Eagles (ie new music)  and on and on.

One thng you'll notice about all of this music is the diversity of it.
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Walkerman
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« Reply #55 on: January 06, 2011, 06:44:26 PM »

Yes a very impressive list indeed and there were others of that year that could be added as were very very  solid albums like John PHILLIPS solo album of that year was amazing and also ZZ Top debut album from that year before the Santa beards, pimpin’ rides, sexy ladies, and MTV videos  they were once an honest to goodness – and damned impressive – Blues band with a capital B. Could probably name another dozen or so that were also album staples.

Gotta wonder tho if a 15 to 20 year old today feels as passionate about this years music offerings. I'm guessing YES!!!!!  

I honestly believe that in the 60's and 70's music was more important to young folks than it is today...and I mean in general.  The 60's and 70's were decades of immense social changes, violence and upheavals.  Music was the voice of young folks.  My sons are amazed that when we go on long trips, I am able to sing along with every song on the car stereo for hours on end.  Sometimes I am amazed myself...not because of the age/memory thing, but just at the sheer volume of songs I know word for word.  And these were somgs that were socially relevant and were being played on all the radio stations.  Nowadays, when young folks pull up next to you, all's you hear is an ear thumping, car vibrating bass, and the f-bomb being dropped every other word.

Yeah, maybe I too am  getting too old.....

As for ZZ Top....my favorites by them are "Jesus Just Left Chicago" and "I'm Bad, I'm Nationwide."
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BenF
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« Reply #56 on: January 06, 2011, 06:51:55 PM »

Perhaps what this suggests is not that music is dead, but that the listener 40 years ago was more discerning, thereby ensuring that the talent sold records. Without demand, the supply chain suffers. I feel that one big difference nowadays is the market primarily wants utter dross, and therefore it is made in bucketloads. It doesn't stop creative people being born and making music. It just has no chance of making these top 10 lists based on sales.
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Ben
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« Reply #57 on: January 06, 2011, 06:53:14 PM »

Wow Walkerman. I think we agreed there.
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Ben
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« Reply #58 on: January 06, 2011, 07:08:54 PM »

Perhaps what this suggests is not that music is dead, but that the listener 40 years ago was more discerning, thereby ensuring that the talent sold records. Without demand, the supply chain suffers. I feel that one big difference nowadays is the market primarily wants utter dross, and therefore it is made in bucketloads. It doesn't stop creative people being born and making music. It just has no chance of making these top 10 lists based on sales.

Well, that goes right back to one of my earlier posts regarding "higher standards."  But I do think you are perhaps underestimating what early bands went through to make it.  Look at the Beatles....they played for a long time in Germany...live gigs.  Then they went back to England and did many long nights of gigs at places like the Cavern...until word of mouth afforded them a shot at making records.  Same for bands over here like the Byrds, Doors etc.  They played all the small clubs on the strip until they got the benefit of word of mouth.  The thing is, they were all accomplished musicians and writers (or relied on Dylan's writings) and worked long and hard to achieve what they got.  Many had been allready playing for years on the folk circuit, and then made it when they went electric.  But they had been performing for years, for peanuts.

I'll tell you where I see more and more very talented new artists making it....country music.  Seems like the country artists are now going thru what rock artists used to go through...playing the clubs and paying their dues. I don't buy many albums anymore...I just have more than I can play or store.  But I have to say, listening to someone like Keith Urban reminds me more of what rock was in the 60's than it does of country.  Guitars, bass and drums.....and most of these younger new country artists can really play their guitars....
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JOYCEfromNS
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« Reply #59 on: January 06, 2011, 07:09:39 PM »

Wow Walkerman. I think we agreed there.

 +1
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