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Author Topic: Which guitar would you most love to own?  (Read 14125 times)
Walkerman
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« Reply #20 on: November 29, 2010, 08:28:43 PM »



Sorry to say my dream guitar isn't probably a Larrivee, although as a new Larry owner, I'm delighted.  How about a 'John Standefer Signature Model' Bertoncini guitar? Link:  http://www.bertonciniguitars.com/0066%20John%20Standefer.htm

 nice guitar

 

Looks like a block of swiss cheese
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willfo
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« Reply #21 on: November 30, 2010, 12:02:31 AM »

 That question is gonna have my girlfriend asking me, "what's wrong" , for at least a couple days!!!! I think about guitars all day as it is , and then have to make a definitive statement in writing about it......feeellling....wwwweeeaaakk...________________________________
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« Reply #22 on: November 30, 2010, 12:35:12 AM »

Yes, it DOES look like Swiss cheese - but I bet the mice would love the sound of it!
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« Reply #23 on: November 30, 2010, 09:04:27 PM »

How about a Linda Mazer or an Ervin Somogyi? Then I could just sit around and look at them and worry that I might get a fingerprint smudge or (God forbid) someone would want to PLAY one of 'em!!!!!

 
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« Reply #24 on: November 30, 2010, 09:58:00 PM »

Mark Twain's Martin Guitar built while the original C.F. Martin, Sr. owned the 2 year old company that Twain purchased used in 1861 (it cost $10 new in 1835) and then turned it into the original travel guitar.

http://www.npr.org/programs/lnfsound/stories/990604.stories.html

I don't care what it sold for at auction, this would be cool and nothing else would come close.
 
 
 
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TEH

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« Reply #25 on: December 01, 2010, 12:00:44 AM »

Mark Twain's Martin Guitar built while the original C.F. Martin, Sr. owned the 2 year old company that Twain purchased used in 1861 (it cost $10 new in 1835) and then turned it into the original travel guitar.

http://www.npr.org/programs/lnfsound/stories/990604.stories.html

I don't care what it sold for at auction, this would be cool and nothing else would come close.
 
 
 

  I never knew about this one. That is quite a collectors item and a nice little guitar.
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« Reply #26 on: December 03, 2010, 04:54:04 AM »

Well, I've come to realize the ultimate guitar is always going to be the next one. Have to mention though that 3 months in, and I'm growing into my custom Berg more and more. I love that guitar.
That mysterious Cedar over Rosewood Olson SJ always has me wondering though...  - as "the other one" naturally  

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« Reply #27 on: December 03, 2010, 09:20:41 AM »

birdfish
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jeremy3220
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« Reply #28 on: December 03, 2010, 03:52:40 PM »

How about a Linda Mazer or an Ervin Somogyi? Then I could just sit around and look at them and worry that I might get a fingerprint smudge or (God forbid) someone would want to PLAY one of 'em!!!!!

 

If I had one I'd play it just like my other guitars.


Guitar I want is a 1935-1937 D-18
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DJ in FL
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« Reply #29 on: December 04, 2010, 12:22:57 AM »

Yes, good suggestion!  I want to keep all my options open.  bigrin


 +1   FOR BOTH vote!

 nice guitar (make that plural)
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« Reply #30 on: December 04, 2010, 01:31:56 AM »


Well, what about the zircote and cedar Lowden that Richard Thompson designed? Haven't heard it, probably never will, but I kinda trust Richard's judgement in this regard.

http://www.exceptionalguitars.com/inventory/detail.php?sn=LOFT071082
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« Reply #31 on: December 04, 2010, 01:10:11 PM »

My Larrivee pick would be the 000-50TSB. A beautiful guitar that just feels and sounds sooooooooo goooooood...

Any maker? ...a Michael Greenfield fan fret (probably go for the 7 string version, natural top colour, since we're playing this game with monopoly money).

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Ron

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« Reply #32 on: December 04, 2010, 02:13:35 PM »

That fan fret looks cool!  nice guitar
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Steve ....aka the SMan
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« Reply #33 on: December 04, 2010, 03:08:47 PM »

Any guitar wil do, provided I can magically play it well.  That is more important than wood and metal.

In that respect, I am darn lucky with my fine Larrivee.
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Ben
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« Reply #34 on: December 06, 2010, 05:40:37 AM »

It'd be super nice to have an original OM-28 JM, those things have appreciated like crazy
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dave42
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« Reply #35 on: December 06, 2010, 12:44:59 PM »

A John Walker Clark Fork or Wise River. The Wise river would be the best addition for me as it is short scale.

I really like this! Clark Fork Brazilian

The Wise River.

Of what I have, my Martin D-42 ain't going nowhere!
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Dave
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« Reply #36 on: December 07, 2010, 12:30:40 AM »

This would cure gas for a little while. Way above my pay skill, butt hay.....




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« Reply #37 on: December 09, 2010, 03:50:17 AM »

 


!) Wow, Mark Twain's Martin. Some deep resonance there . . .

2) Now I know that when I recently watched a vid by the wonderful Andy McKee (if you don't already know, he's in the Kottke- Hedges line of things, and very fine) it wasn't an optical illusion, a flashback or a fisheye lens. It was a Greenfield guitar. How the heck does that work? Mr. Greenfield must be a very, very finely-tuned luthier to pull that off. Among other things, it must be the Montreal joie de vivre. Well done my excellent countryman! Just might have to take a trip to Montreal. I'd just love to play one, and then humbly decide . . .

3) It used to be so much simpler. With the incredible talent, diversity and complexity of the guitars being made these days, who has the time to keep up except fanatics and those in the business? The more you look into it, the more extraordinary handmade guitar builders you find -- the whole situation is like a seductive Pandora's Box. These days it's seems quite possible to go crazy second guessing yourself about "that one and only" guitar.

4) That said, I think it would be interesting to have a thread about the psychology of the collector. I know something about it, having collected very fine wines for about 10 years and then realizing that in some ways I was more interested in knowing about wine than drinking it. I had all this great wine -- about 650 bottles of very, very fine French, Italian, American and Australian wine (and also, I admit it, some Canadian ). The problem is that for the most part I wasn't drinking it all that much, so I sold most of it to restaurants and friends.

5) So while it can be wonderful to covet fine guitars, does it not sometimes get in the way of writing and playing music, rather than facilitating it? Dreaming of, and researching, the ultimate guitar can be a rather time-wasting endeavour these days, regardless of how you'd rather spend time -- playing, writing, or doing something else central to your well-being. Can't chasing after the greatest guitar be like an empty shell game that sometimes distracts from the very reasons why you'd truly want it in the first place?

6) All that said, I feel very fortunate to have found the wonderful guitars I have relatively easily (and inexpensively). From my experience, though -- covetous hypocrite that I am -- the two best guitars I've ever played are:  a late 60's Brazilian (quarter-sown) Martin D-45, from a run of about 400 at the end of an era; and second, a Martin D-45V EIR at Tom Lee's in downtown Vancouver that is the clearest, loudest, most balanced guitar I've ever played -- despite those who would turn up their noses because it's a production guitar . . . If i won the lottery, I'd buy it tomorrow.

7) That said, as far 6-strings go I currently have a rather noteworthy 1998, Vancouver-made Larrivee D-10 Braz, the best Martin HD-28V I've ever played, and a nice Takamine Garth Brooks cutaway dread that I use for playing outside in the hot sun, in car washes, etc.    The only guitar I might change is one of my 12-strings, a Taylor 855ce jumbo. It's the best 12er I've ever played in EVERY respect except for the characterically (too) bright, steely and jangly Taylor tone, which I suspect I need to say little about. I'm looking at two replacement options: a Morgan, handmade MadRose 12er that I can get new in Vancouver at a quite reduced price; and a Martin Grand J12-40E which, if you don't know about it, look it up.      

8) Generally, though, I'm trying to simplify things rather than collect: two 6-strings and one 12-string. That's all I need on the acoustic side, although I can appreciate that other much more tuned-in guitarists need more.

All the best . . .

  
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broKen
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« Reply #38 on: December 09, 2010, 05:37:19 AM »




!) Wow, Mark Twain's Martin. Some deep resonance there . . .

2) Now I know that when I recently watched a vid by the wonderful Andy McKee (if you don't already know, he's in the Kottke- Hedges line of things, and very fine) it wasn't an optical illusion, a flashback or a fisheye lens. It was a Greenfield guitar. How the heck does that work? Mr. Greenfield must be a very, very finely-tuned luthier to pull that off. Among other things, it must be the Montreal joie de vivre. Well done my excellent countryman! Just might have to take a trip to Montreal. I'd just love to play one, and then humbly decide . . .

3) It used to be so much simpler. With the incredible talent, diversity and complexity of the guitars being made these days, who has the time to keep up except fanatics and those in the business? The more you look into it, the more extraordinary handmade guitar builders you find -- the whole situation is like a seductive Pandora's Box. These days it's seems quite possible to go crazy second guessing yourself about "that one and only" guitar.

4) That said, I think it would be interesting to have a thread about the psychology of the collector. I know something about it, having collected very fine wines for about 10 years and then realizing that in some ways I was more interested in knowing about wine than drinking it. I had all this great wine -- about 650 bottles of very, very fine French, Italian, American and Australian wine (and also, I admit it, some Canadian ). The problem is that for the most part I wasn't drinking it all that much, so I sold most of it to restaurants and friends.

5) So while it can be wonderful to covet fine guitars, does it not sometimes get in the way of writing and playing music, rather than facilitating it? Dreaming of, and researching, the ultimate guitar can be a rather time-wasting endeavour these days, regardless of how you'd rather spend time -- playing, writing, or doing something else central to your well-being. Can't chasing after the greatest guitar be like an empty shell game that sometimes distracts from the very reasons why you'd truly want it in the first place?

6) All that said, I feel very fortunate to have found the wonderful guitars I have relatively easily (and inexpensively). From my experience, though -- covetous hypocrite that I am -- the two best guitars I've ever played are:  a late 60's Brazilian (quarter-sown) Martin D-45, from a run of about 400 at the end of an era; and second, a Martin D-45V EIR at Tom Lee's in downtown Vancouver that is the clearest, loudest, most balanced guitar I've ever played -- despite those who would turn up their noses because it's a production guitar . . . If i won the lottery, I'd buy it tomorrow.

7) That said, as far 6-strings go I currently have a rather noteworthy 1998, Vancouver-made Larrivee D-10 Braz, the best Martin HD-28V I've ever played, and a nice Takamine Garth Brooks cutaway dread that I use for playing outside in the hot sun, in car washes, etc.    The only guitar I might change is one of my 12-strings, a Taylor 855ce jumbo. It's the best 12er I've ever played in EVERY respect except for the characterically (too) bright, steely and jangly Taylor tone, which I suspect I need to say little about. I'm looking at two replacement options: a Morgan, handmade MadRose 12er that I can get new in Vancouver at a quite reduced price; and a Martin Grand J12-40E which, if you don't know about it, look it up.       

8) Generally, though, I'm trying to simplify things rather than collect: two 6-strings and one 12-string. That's all I need on the acoustic side, although I can appreciate that other much more tuned-in guitarists need more.

All the best . . .

 






 waddeesay? 
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« Reply #39 on: December 09, 2010, 06:58:09 AM »

 

Oh, oh, I'm beginning to think that it would be prudent, with reference to wine, to avoid any and all nationalistic biases in a vinophiliacally-correct way that's similar to avoiding religious and political discussion -- notwithstanding the fact that I'm Canadian, live within a few hours of the Okanagan valley, and have bought and enjoyed many wines from there (particularly the high-end Meritages and reds in general from Osooyos Larose, Burrowing Owl, Sumac Ridge, Cedar Creek, Inniskillin, Mission Hills, Gehringer Brothers, Iimkeep(?), Note Bene, Fairview, and many others, as well as some of the great icewines, late harvest and German varietal whites from a variety of sources.

What I was really trying to say was that I had all these ordinary, everyday bottles of Bordeaux, Chateauneuf-du-Pape, Burgundy, Barolo, Barbaresco, Brunello, California Cab, Australian Shiraz, and so on, but that on top of all that ordinary, everyday stuff, I even had some award-winning Canadian wines!.

Anyway, what do I know -- as I said, I sold nearly all of it anyway . . .
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