Pages: 1 ... 4 [5] 6 7   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: 69 Things to Love About Bob Dylan.  (Read 12753 times)
jeremy3220
Gold Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4598




Ignore
« Reply #80 on: February 18, 2011, 03:19:52 AM »

 How do you know I'm not as young as you?


Cause you like the byrds  You didn't have to say it.

So is it just the Byrds and that style you don't care for or do you feel the same way about Buffalo Springfield, Crosby Stills and Nash (and Young), etc. and acts from that era in general?

Well I don't like any of those, however I listen to a lot of music from the 60's and earlier. What I meant about the Byrds was that they don't transcend their era.  I think they were riding a wave. Personally, they sound like a generic pop band. They turned Mr. Tambourine Man into a very domestic sing along type performance, sounds like kids' music to me. I don't like music that's too easy to digest.
Logged

L07 Shooting Star
Gold Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3683




Ignore
« Reply #81 on: February 18, 2011, 05:57:44 AM »

Jeremy,
Different strokes for different folks.  The Byrds were  pretty iconic in their time.  Not sure what you mean by generic, but for sure they were a pop band, top 30, hit parade or whatever you want to call it.  So were most of the bands I mentioned before.  They were all on the hit parade and got lots of radio play.  Back then in the olden days, when dinosaurs like me were young, you heard these bands on the radio and that's how you got to know about them.  If you really liked them then you saved up your paper route money and went down to the mall on saturday and bought a 45 record of their song at Woolco for 79 cents.  If you were really rich, you would buy an LP album.  I think the first actual LP I bought was by Paul Revere and the Raiders.  Other early ones were by a band called the Cyrcle who had a hit called "Red Rubber Ball", and  of course the Beatles, and the Monkees.

I think even Dylan became first known to many people my age by being played on the radio too.  I can still remember hearing my first Dylan song, "Like a Rolling Stone" for the first time on my transistor radio on my way home from school when I was in grade 7 or 8!  I was very taken by that song.  I heard "Rainy Day Women" for the first time that way too.  I had no idea at the time that he had been a "folk singer" before that or that there had been a big controversy about him going electric and all that stuff.

When me and my buddies got a little older and started forming garage bands, we started to look at top 30 or pop songs with disdain.  Then, the cool thing to do was to listen to "underground" music on FM radio.  These were songs not on the hit parade from LPs by artists like Canned Heat, or Led Zeppelin, the Doors, Yardbirds, Iron Butterfly, or Vanilla Fudge etc. etc.  The DJ would talk in a solemn quiet voice and often offer some insight into the song or artist.  We called those uncool folks who just listened to AM pop music "bubble gummers" and their music was labeled "bubble gum" music.

So maybe that's the kind of music you don't like; bubble gum music.
Logged

"Badges?  We don't need no stinkin' badges."

Became a Shooting Star when I got my 1st guitar.
Back in '66, I was 13 and that was my fix.
Still shooting for stardom after all this time.
If I never make it, I'll still be fine.


 
flatlander
Gold Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3782




Ignore
« Reply #82 on: February 18, 2011, 10:44:14 AM »

 Ha! I just jumped to the end of this thread but you are absolutely wrong, er, I disagree about the Byrds not transcending thier era. Thier influence is everywhere in country music today. For better or worse. They and a handful of others are the ones who first started tranforming folk and later country music, into hipper contemporary style and brought it to an entire generation. A generation who could not help but blend it , as the Byrds did, with rock, blues and music that was already in thier blood. Lyrically too. they helped open up subject material of country music.  
    Clarence Whiltes electric guitar work with the Byrds is absolutely a major influence on good country pickers still today.. Music always evolves, but in my view they gave it a big shove in the direction it ended up going. On the backs of the Byrds, Flying Burrito Brothers, New Riders and other lesser known, mostly California bands, the Eagles capitalized. (not to take away from Eagles who had paid thier early country rock dues)  A lot of young country artist today, especially but not exclusively, so-called outlaw country artist, cite the Byrds as Major influence. So in my opinion from both a direct influence, as in Clarences pickin, or bands sound in general, to a broader sense of opening up country music, thier legacy lives on thru much music being made 40 years later.
  There Byrds were only riding a wave in '65 in the sense that that McGuinn picked up an electric guitar like everyone else after the Beatles came out. Like many other folkies it wasn't just that they were influnced by them, it was a matter of survival if you wanted to get by playing music. Other wise they were causing waves, not riding them. Thier sound in 65 was fresh and different. It was others who were influenced by them. By the time that sound became common, they were moving on. To only cite the "bubble gum" sound as it was called in this thread,  very unfairly leaves out the post Crosby and Clark years. For one thing that era disintregrates the "riding the wave" idea. Sweethearts of the Rodeo" took a lot of balls to put out. Rock and country were in different universes then.  And in fact it remains I think, the Byrds worst selling album, yet one of the most influential.  Besides they weren't considered Bubble Gum at the time anyway.  Bubble Gum came a little later in the form of the bands Like The Cowsillls, Partridge Family, Ohio Express etc. To throw the Byrds into that camp is just plain wrong, and honestly, ignorant. You might not like them, and that's one thing. But if you're going to cut a band to the bone by calling them generic and not creative, know what you're talking about.  That's unfair. Anyone who doesn't realize thier impact and influence to this day, doesn't know thier music history.
 This video here was the Byrds by the time Bubble Gum music had come out. There's 2 songs. Be fair and listen to both. Clarence's guitar sounds a little raw, but listen to what he's doing.
(after only playing electric guitar for probably 18 months) Those prebend pedal steel sounds, that ended up leading to his and Gene Clarks invention of the B Bender, are absolutely influential sounds.
That's on first Dylan cover. Then on Wheels on Fire, well just call the Byrds bubble gum again. The Byrds later 60's lineup was considerd one of the hottest live acts to see as well.  I think you've made the mistake of being influenced by putting thier music in a little 60's box in the same manner that some folks won't watch an old black and white movie and thus miss out on great stuff.
 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m37-2eB-wj8


Logged

10-1614 more than a number, it's body and soul.
Glennd
Senior Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 190




Ignore
« Reply #83 on: February 18, 2011, 01:21:26 PM »


    
  To only cite the "bubble gum" sound as it was called in this thread,  very unfairly leaves out the post Crosby and Clark years. For one thing that era disintregrates the "riding the wave" idea. Sweethearts of the Rodeo" took a lot of balls to put out. Rock and country were in different universes then.  And in fact it remains I think, the Byrds worst selling album, yet one of the most influential.  



+1 +1 +1 +1 I feel strongly that the inclusion of the Christian influenced songs on this album had a lot to do with its lack of commercial appeal. One of my favorites to this day.
Logged

1987 Takamine EN-10C
2008 Larrivee  LV-10
2010 Martin D35 Maury Muhlheison
2010 Martin D21- Special
2011 Martin HD-18V Custom
2012 Martin OMM John Renbourn
jeremy3220
Gold Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4598




Ignore
« Reply #84 on: February 18, 2011, 02:27:23 PM »

What I meant was not that they never did anything after the mid 60's but rather that I can't imagine people who didn't catch on to them during that era caring about them. For instance, New Kids on the Block were wildly popular, influenced other large boy bands who then influenced or directly produced huge pop stars like Justin Timberlake.  Maybe the New Kids even had later albums that were more sophisticated that their fans loved. So there is no doubt New Kids on the Block were important in shaping the world of pop music however I would be blown away to learn that people who didn't listen to them back then are now discovering their music and how great it is.



As a fan of bluegrass I'm aware of Clarence White.

The clip you posted still sounds like a sing along version of the original. I really can't handle McGuinn's vocal delivery.
Logged

ducktrapper
Donuts?
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 10999




Ignore
« Reply #85 on: February 18, 2011, 02:32:14 PM »

Which Byrds are we talking about? How many albums did the original band make? Are we including everything that Jim/Roger McGuinn had his name on? I'm a fan of the Byrds, have all their albums, but seriously no one can legitimately argue they're in Dylan's league. He's in a league of his own. Thus this thread ye scurvy bunch of thread pirates!      
Logged
flatlander
Gold Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3782




Ignore
« Reply #86 on: February 18, 2011, 02:52:00 PM »

Dylan's a true original to which no one can compare. Personally he's one of the reasons I started playing harmonica along with guitar, making first harmonica holders out of clothes hangers. Lyrically
in a league of his own. I think he a damn good singer too. Some may not like the way his vocal chords happen to resonate but when you go to learn his songs and pay attention to his phrasing, it's really cool. Delivers the emotion.
 You'll just have to excuse me if Sweethearts of the Rodeo and beyond isn't considered real Byrds. I say good ridence to Crosby.  Clarke was a good song writer. Hillman a great muscian who hung around a little longer than Crosby.
 As far as the comment about younger people not from that era, not caring about them, well your just wrong. At least in the arena that matters most. That is young musicians in country and country rock who take the time and have the interest to know where thier music comes from. They are cited by younger musicians as big influences. I've heard it/seen it, in audible and written interviews.
 I can understand not getting the impact of what Clarence was doing on first song, raw sounding and, I much, much better like his acoustic stuff, but...he was doing some innovative things that was and still is, a major influence on other players.
Logged

10-1614 more than a number, it's body and soul.
L07 Shooting Star
Gold Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3683




Ignore
« Reply #87 on: February 18, 2011, 06:27:56 PM »

Flatlander,
I never meant to imply the Byrds were a "bubble gum" band.  I agree with you on their importance and influence.  Like I said, they were one of my first inspirations in learning the guitar and I emulated them (or tried to) a lot.  I still listen to them often.  I just recently learned how to play "Feel a Whole Lot Better", for example.

Like you said, bubble gum came later and included the bands you mentioned.  I was just reminiscing about how, in the crowd I hung around with, you weren't cool if you liked "bubble gum" music.  I actually was a closet "bubble gummer" but I would never admit that to my friends.

Sorry Duck.  I felt I had to explain myself better.  And to bring it back on to Dylan, I agree with those who classify him among the all time elite in terms of song creation.  But I still think he can't sing today.  Let's say he could "deliver" a song like nobody else in the beginning, and maybe even sing OK.  I put Neil Young in kind of the same position;  A huge influence on rock music,  a great creator of songs and a great guitarist, but to me, only a so-so singer.  It's the total package that makes these artists so appealing, not that they are great singers (technically?).  When you think about it, there are so many lead singers in iconic rock bands that if you were to evaluate their singing in a technical way, they wouldn't be considered good singers.  But so what?  It's how they deliver a song is what makes them great.
Logged

"Badges?  We don't need no stinkin' badges."

Became a Shooting Star when I got my 1st guitar.
Back in '66, I was 13 and that was my fix.
Still shooting for stardom after all this time.
If I never make it, I'll still be fine.


 
Walkerman
Gold Member
****
Online Online

Posts: 4661




Ignore
« Reply #88 on: February 18, 2011, 08:25:19 PM »

The Byrds are just one more thing Dylan transcended. They needed him way more than he needed them.  

You bring up an interesting point.  But to my way of thinking (and I graduated from high school in 67 so I kind of experienced this whole thing) if it hadn't of been for folks like Peter, Paul and Mary, the Byrds, the Turtles etc, Dylan might well have remaind a relatively small player.  To the world at large (ie, the world outside Greenwich Village), he became known as a writer long before he became known as a performer.
IOW....he needed them as much as they needed him. Had other folks not made his songs famous, he might never have gotten a listen as a performer. When I first heard Tambourine Man, I thought that the Byrds were a really good band playing a really good song.  Sometime later I heard the writer was Dylan.  About the only thing I knew about Dylan was that he had also written Blowin in the Wind, and that was only because I saw PP&M sing it on TV, and they said it was written by Bob Dylan.

It's like the reported conversation...

Bob Dylan to John Lennon....You've got nothing to say

John Lennon to Bob Dylan....No one hears what you say.
Logged
L07 Shooting Star
Gold Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3683




Ignore
« Reply #89 on: February 19, 2011, 01:24:29 AM »

Right on, Walkerman
Logged

"Badges?  We don't need no stinkin' badges."

Became a Shooting Star when I got my 1st guitar.
Back in '66, I was 13 and that was my fix.
Still shooting for stardom after all this time.
If I never make it, I'll still be fine.


 
ducktrapper
Donuts?
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 10999




Ignore
« Reply #90 on: February 19, 2011, 01:58:00 AM »

I can't help but believe that nothing would have stopped Dylan's progress. Where are these people you mention today? Bob's still going strong. I'd be the first to admit that his singing style is unusual but it always works for me. People can do silly half arsed imitations of him but they can't duplicate his success. I think he is a great  singer.
Logged
jeremy3220
Gold Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4598




Ignore
« Reply #91 on: February 19, 2011, 02:33:46 AM »

Where are these people you mention today? B

PPM is probably somewhere fighting for communism.
Logged

L07 Shooting Star
Gold Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3683




Ignore
« Reply #92 on: February 19, 2011, 03:58:49 AM »

I can't help but believe that nothing would have stopped Dylan's progress. Where are these people you mention today? Bob's still going strong. I'd be the first to admit that his singing style is unusual but it always works for me. People can do silly half arsed imitations of him but they can't duplicate his success. I think he is a great  singer.
Which reminds me.  I think his son, Jacob Jakob is a much better singer than the old man.  His voice has a similiar tone, ring, timbre (is that the right word?) while his singing is more melodic or something.  Not up and down as much or what I described  earlier as "da Da, da Da, da Da, da Da .....".  Hard to describe.

Kurt
Logged

"Badges?  We don't need no stinkin' badges."

Became a Shooting Star when I got my 1st guitar.
Back in '66, I was 13 and that was my fix.
Still shooting for stardom after all this time.
If I never make it, I'll still be fine.


 
ducktrapper
Donuts?
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 10999




Ignore
« Reply #93 on: February 19, 2011, 01:56:29 PM »

Which reminds me.  I think his son, Jacob is a much better singer than the old man.  His voice has a similiar tone, ring, timbre (is that the right word?) while his singing is more melodic or something.  Not up and down as much or what I described  earlier as "da Da, da Da, da Da, da Da .....".  Hard to describe.

Kurt

You might want to start a thread entitled ... 1 Thing to Love About Jakob Dylan.         whistling   
Logged
ducktrapper
Donuts?
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 10999




Ignore
« Reply #94 on: February 19, 2011, 03:04:25 PM »

PPM is probably somewhere fighting for communism.

Well, America is  the greatest threat to world peace, after all.
Logged
JOYCEfromNS
Admin
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6270



« Reply #95 on: February 19, 2011, 04:37:39 PM »

Well, America is  the greatest threat to world peace, after all.

Certainly a thankless difficult job playing the role it must play in our World always having a big target on it's back
Logged

Larrivee Electrics - My Dream then and Now!!!!!<br /><br />Forum IV     00-03MT       #4      (Treasured)
ewalling
Senior Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 381




Ignore
« Reply #96 on: March 28, 2011, 04:00:50 PM »

There was a time in the 60s when Dylan's lyrics were so hot they could have burned a hole in the sofa:

I wish I could give brother Bill his great thrill
I would set him in chains at the top of the hill
Then send for some pillars and Cecil B. deMille
He could die happily ever after!


Brilliant ... and spat out with such uncompromising energy and contempt. I don't think there has been anyone in the history of rock/pop music capable of aiming such a laser beam on what it means it be human and tell it so honestly - maybe brutally - and so perfectly and with such frequency. It wasn't that long before he'd shot his bolt, but while he was in full throttle, I think we were in the presence of greatness just as we were when Elvis and the Beatles were in their prime.
Logged
ducktrapper
Donuts?
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 10999




Ignore
« Reply #97 on: March 28, 2011, 04:58:48 PM »

Oh, imho, he still writes the odd good song. 

"Well I got here followin' the southern star
I crossed that river just to be where you are
Only one thing I did wrong
Stayed in Mississippi a day too long"

- from Mississippi

"Standing on the gallows with my head in a noose
Any minute now I’m expecting all hell to break loose
People are crazy and times are strange
I’m locked in tight, I’m out of range
I used to care, but things have changed"

- from Things Have Changed.

"Oh, I miss you Nettie Moore
And my happiness is o'er
Winter's gone, the river's on the rise
I loved you then and ever shall
But there's no one here that's left to tell
The world has gone black before my eyes"

- from Nettie Moore

Beyond Here Lies Nothin'
I love you pretty baby
You're the only love I've ever known
Just as long as you stay with me
The whole world is my throne
Beyond here lies nothin'
Nothin' we can call our own

I'm movin' after midnight
Down boulevards of broken cars
Don't know what to do without it
Without this love that we call ours
Beyond here lies nothin'
Nothin' but the moon and stars

Down every street there's a window
And every window made of glass
We'll keep on lovin' pretty baby
For as long as love will last
Beyond here lies nothin'
But the mountains of the past

My ship is in the harbor
And the sails are spread
Listen to me pretty baby
Lay your hand upon my head
Beyond here lies nothin'
Nothin' done and nothin' said

- Beyond Here Lies Nothing

I think he's still got it.
 

Logged
jeremy3220
Gold Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4598




Ignore
« Reply #98 on: March 28, 2011, 07:08:41 PM »


I think he's still got it. 


"The river whispers in my ear
I've hardly a penny to my name
The heavens never seemed so near
And all my body glows with flame.

The tempest struggles in the air
Unto myself alone I sing
It could sink me then and there
I can hear the echoes ring" ~ Tell Ol' Bill



I think if he doesn't have it then no one does. He's still serves them up hot too...

"Gonna raise me an army, some tough sons of bitches
I'll recruit my army from the orphanages
I been to St. Herman's church, said my religious vows
As I've sucked the milk out of a thousand cows

I've got the pork chops, she's got the pie
She ain't no angel and neither am I
Shame on your greed, shame on your wicked schemes
I'll say this, I don't give a damn about your dreams"~Thunder on the Mountain


Logged

Walkerman
Gold Member
****
Online Online

Posts: 4661




Ignore
« Reply #99 on: March 28, 2011, 07:53:18 PM »

"Bob's still going strong"

He's going strong like the stones are going strong...based upon his past catalog and a lack of current talent in the music world.
When was the last time a bunch of current artists recorded one of his new songs?
Logged
Pages: 1 ... 4 [5] 6 7   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to: