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Author Topic: Glossing a Satin Finish/New process  (Read 2253 times)
Peter Cree
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« on: November 16, 2010, 02:18:29 PM »

I've read and likely created the advice previously given but after doing so many I'd like to share my recent techniques.   I understand many love the matte but some of us dislike the sound of the matte while recording or love clarity in viewing the wood.

These apply for nitro (Martin) or Poly (Taylor or Larrivee) and are safer and faster.  do not use this on shellac.   If you do use olive oil instead of water.

1. Disregard previous instructions in the FAQ sections.   Scratch X has silicone.....no silicone!  
2.  Buy 1500 grit wet-dry paper.    Remember. or realize .....matte is sprayed on as a series of tiny dots.  If just polished you get a shiny, lumpy surface. you can get a true, near gloss.
3.  get a small bowl of warm water and add one or two drops of dish washing liquid.
4.   Get a small block of wood or cork.   1" by 1" or there-about.
5.   Wrap the wet-dry around block (don't use leave out the sanding block!) dip in the soapy water and lightly sand.  Only sand in the wet.   Wipe off water with a paper towel.   You should sand with small X's or if confident actually sand across he grain. Then sand with the grain.
6. observe the surface. it should not be shiny.   You are leveling the finish and some guitars like a 15 series Martin will have shiny spots on the grain.  Level until gone.
7. when you achieve flat and dull dry it off then hand polish with your choice of fine auto rubbing compounds.   With this system I use turtle Wax, no silicone, white , fine rubbing compound.

Thats it.    Its fast, safe with the 1500 paper and the final polish leaves clear ,clean results.   You'll love it.   This is the fastest method that produces great results with minimum risk.

As to questions........I'm happy to answer one e-mail but 10 takes too much time.   I'm a pro/self employed and just can't spend hours with people.   This method works well but you're on your own.
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Peter
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bluesman67
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« Reply #1 on: November 16, 2010, 04:13:49 PM »

Thanks for sharing your knowledge!  While I doubt I will ever do this, there will be many who want to and they will be much more confident with your instructions.  Is there any ongoing maintenance needed after this is done?
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bluesman67
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jeremy3220
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« Reply #2 on: November 16, 2010, 06:05:54 PM »

I also came to the conclusion that wet sanding would be the best way. It's what many use when they completely finish a guitar so why not when you're polishing a satin guitar. The steel wool just doesn't make sense.

Cree, have you tried paraffin oil as a lubricant?
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Peter Cree
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« Reply #3 on: November 16, 2010, 10:36:07 PM »

Trying to teach finishing , especially the rub out part, is very difficult.    there are so many techniques and technical aspects that its so easy to have someone screw up their guitar.   I originally told people to use xxxx steel wool because its easier that sanding with its equivalent , which is 600 wet dry.  Wool is especial good on the curved sides.  

Detail and chemistry will confuse more than it'll help.....most of the time.

Anyway this procedure works very well, especially on Larrivee's.  Takes time though.   Be prepared.   But at least people won't put silicone on their guitars and won't sand through , especially the edges, and can come out with a gorgeous finish.   Its an upgrade if you're careful and patient.

I don't have any need for the paraffin oil Jeremy.    The soapy water is so excellent and its easy to see what you're doing without wiping oil off the surface. All shops are different as you know.  

My thought here was , "finally a safer way to do this procedure with near professional results even for a novice".

Cheers
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Peter
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Mr_LV19E
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« Reply #4 on: November 17, 2010, 12:00:24 AM »

This should replace the other method in the FAQ section.  Mark?
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Roger


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jeremy3220
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« Reply #5 on: November 17, 2010, 02:43:46 AM »



I don't have any need for the paraffin oil Jeremy.    The soapy water is so excellent and its easy to see what you're doing without wiping oil off the surface. All shops are different as you know.  


That makes sense. The paraffin oil is a good lubricant but it's also a pain to keep wiping it off.
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Peter Cree
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« Reply #6 on: November 17, 2010, 07:02:21 PM »

PS..............I have a Martin 000-15sm in the studio to gloss.   the filler is different from the previous models.   It colors the grain but does not fill it.  so beware.    I can still do it but its going to take many,many hours to flatten.   Larri's are much easier to do.
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Peter
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Queequeg
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« Reply #7 on: November 17, 2010, 07:33:23 PM »

This should replace the other method in the FAQ section.  Mark?
I will link this thread to the one in FAQ.
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Strings4Him
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« Reply #8 on: July 16, 2011, 10:34:33 PM »

If I were to use the Turtle Wax Express Shine on a Larrivee Satin guitar would this be ok?  I am not necessarily interested creating a glossy guitar.  I just want to polish up the satin surface but not to a gloss finish.

Thanks 
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