Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Changing the molecular formula of the wood in your guitar?  (Read 1771 times)
AndyMcDandy
Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 25




Ignore
« on: October 07, 2010, 03:29:52 AM »

That's what these guys do to speed up the aging process in the wood...  They can take a brand new guitar and make it "open up" as if it's a 50 year old guitar.


http://alchemyacousticlabs.com/

Any thoughts?  I don't think I could ever do this to one of my guitars.  But it is kinda intriguing.



 
Logged

Larrivee OMV-10 unicorn inlay
Martin 000-1 (now a discontinued model)
Fender SRV custom (a relic'd 1992 srv artist series)
Gibson Les Paul classic black with gold hardware
Fender american strat 3 tone sunburst with tortoise shell pick guard
Mesa boogie F-50
frankhond
Senior Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 377




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: October 07, 2010, 07:50:39 AM »

I bought an expensive guitar some time ago that had its top preaged by some swiss process, maybe the same, some kind of biochemistry. It sounded fantastic. But I had it for a few years, and gradually it lost something, responsivity, fullness, dunno. It basically sounded deader as it aged. Maybe the mahogany in the back and sides aged and the top didn't catch up...no idea. I ended up selling it.

Logged
Barefoot Rob
Donuts?
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 14029




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: October 07, 2010, 12:41:49 PM »

I went to the site and no real info on the process.I still hold that a guitar just needs to be played.If what you want is an old broken in sound save your money,get a second job/mortgage,sell evrything you own whatever ittakes and buy an old guitar.
Logged

A REPAIRPERSON,Still Unclrob
OM03PA
Favorite saying
 OB LA DE OB LA DA,LIFE GOES ON---BRA,It is what it is,You just gotta deal it,
One By One The Penguins Steal My Sanity*Eat The Rich*, Keith and Barefoot Rob on youtube
Still unclrob
#19
12 people ignoring me,so cool
www.rpjguitarworks.com
Call PM me I may b
Dr. LJ
Senior Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 227




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: October 07, 2010, 01:15:54 PM »

I guess I am old fashioned but I let my guitars age the same way I do--year at a time.  That goes by a lot faster than I would like as it is.  I play them as much as I can and they seem to do fine without being dipped in vats of chemicals or having electric motors hooked up to them.  I know there are those who claim that by doing these things their guitars now sound like pre-war, $150,000 Martins, but I sort of prefer the old  way of just playing the things and letting them come of age on their own.  I do not want to go to bed at night and then have to get up because I forgot to plug in the guitars.  I get up often enough now.

LJ
Logged
bluesman67
Gold Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3166




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: October 07, 2010, 01:27:46 PM »

My take on it is this...

if it's so great, eventually there will be a guitar maker like Martin, Taylor, or Larrivee.... that will partner with these guys and put out a model right off the factory floor that has gone through this process and the guitar will have the same guarantee from the maker.  If and when that happens...I would buy one for the right price.  Until then, no way I do something to one of my guitars that 1. will void the guarantee, 2. may make it sound like crap in 20 years instead of aging like a fine wine, 3. It just seems wrong.
Logged

bluesman67
HOGTOP CHARLOTTE

www.reverbnation.com/hogtopcharlotte
jeremy3220
Gold Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4598




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: October 07, 2010, 01:40:15 PM »

Wood doesn't have a certain molecular formula.

Quote
The AO1 Process™ is a proprietary, multi-stage process that reconfigures the properties of the wood of a guitar, relative to its performance as a musical instrument.

In the supplement industry they use the marketing term 'proprietary blend' which usually means junk filler. There's no explanation of the process, probably for good reason and there's is no way in hell I'd spend $700 for... well whatever it is they do.
Logged

ducktrapper
Donuts?
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 11008




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: October 07, 2010, 01:49:24 PM »

My thoughts, especially concerning the nature of most of your latest posts, is that folks should just buy a guitar they like. You know, in the first place. YMMV.
Logged
AndyMcDandy
Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 25




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: October 07, 2010, 02:02:54 PM »

And by owning a guitar for long enough to "open up" you just get that much more attached to it!  Sentimental, really!  =D
Logged

Larrivee OMV-10 unicorn inlay
Martin 000-1 (now a discontinued model)
Fender SRV custom (a relic'd 1992 srv artist series)
Gibson Les Paul classic black with gold hardware
Fender american strat 3 tone sunburst with tortoise shell pick guard
Mesa boogie F-50
SMan
Gold Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1362




Ignore
« Reply #8 on: October 07, 2010, 02:36:00 PM »

I would hope my guitar sounds great the day I buy it.
Logged

Steve ....aka the SMan
hellostarling
Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 57


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #9 on: October 07, 2010, 08:25:14 PM »

Some people think the "opening up" process is a myth, but I think there's something to it. Scientifically, there is a change over time in the wood.

I think most everyone here agrees that pre-aging an instrument seems against the whole idea of being a player and a performer. We either buy a vintage guitar with the mojo that's been "earned" or we enjoy adding the battle scars to new instruments ourselves.

My issue is that if the guitar in question is valuable and then pre-aged 50 years? What happens to it in another 50 years?
Logged

Six for Six: Take six lessons at Magnolia Guitar and give a new guitar to a disadvantaged child to take lessons. Six lessons. Six strings. Six for Six. www.magnoliaguitar.com/sixforsix/
bluesman67
Gold Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3166




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: October 07, 2010, 08:49:44 PM »

...  My issue is that if the guitar in question is valuable and then pre-aged 50 years? What happens to it in another 50 years?

Stealing from Peter to pay Paul....
Logged

bluesman67
HOGTOP CHARLOTTE

www.reverbnation.com/hogtopcharlotte
BenF
Gold Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3256




Ignore
« Reply #11 on: October 07, 2010, 09:12:54 PM »

Yamaha do something similar on their L26 ARE and L36 ARE models.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E-W3iLm9RRg&feature=youtube_gdata_player

I read about this a couple of years back and then heard nothing more. Not sure if they still do it.
Logged

Ben
2009 FIII LS-03RHB #5

http://www.youtube.com/user/1978BenF
Dale_I
Gold Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1209




Ignore
« Reply #12 on: October 07, 2010, 10:02:27 PM »

From a cursory reading of the "data" (I use that term loosely), I have a couple problems with what they are saying. Saying it is proprietary simply means that they own the specific process and is generally used to defer any and all questions as to how any type of "snake oil" works. However, when they say they have a patent pending, they admit that the process is legally protected, which means they can divulge any and all information on it without losing the ability to protect their proprietary process.

I totally disagree with this statement they make:
"...your guitar was a tree for a lot longer than it has been a guitar. The cellular polymer properties of the wood are still acting like a tree which, while optimum for resisting gale force winds, is not conducive to producing the best musical sound."

I think this is the exact nature of why instruments made of wood sound good. The balance of strength and give. As far as them needing to protect the process from pantent infringement from China (supposed reason they can't explain the process given in their FAQ sheet)... they can't. China law does not recognize the generally accepted international patent process.

Actually, I see nothing wrong with the natural aging process. Play your guitar and it will sound better than not playing your guitar. No reason to have it "chemically altered" to sound like a guitar that has been played. The side benefit is... you will more than likely be a better player if you play your guitar as well!
Logged

"The barrier to knowledge is the belief that you have it"

2006 Larrivee LV-10 MR   1980 Les Paul Custom Natural   Larrivee LV-03-12   1998 Carvin LB75 Koa Bass
Glennd
Senior Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 190




Ignore
« Reply #13 on: October 08, 2010, 11:41:23 AM »

  bowdown The side benefit is... you will more than likely be a better player if you play your guitar as well!
[/quote]
  bowdown
Improve your playing,improve your guitar how much more incentive is needed
Logged

1987 Takamine EN-10C
2008 Larrivee  LV-10
2010 Martin D35 Maury Muhlheison
2010 Martin D21- Special
2011 Martin HD-18V Custom
2012 Martin OMM John Renbourn
bearsville0
Gold Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1749




Ignore
« Reply #14 on: October 09, 2010, 02:34:00 AM »

They ask:

"So the question is, how can I take my not-so-old guitar/mandolin/violin etc. and make it forget that it’s a tree, sooner rather than later?"

I say the fastest way to make a guitar forget that it's a tree is to build it from plastic right at the start.

I say the fastest way to make a guitar forget that it's a tree is to remind it that it's a beaver.

I say the fastest way to make a guitar forget that it's a tree is shoot it up with some of the ol' Alzheimer serum.
Logged

If it sounds good, it is good.

broKen
Gold Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2662




Ignore
« Reply #15 on: October 09, 2010, 05:29:16 AM »

No temperature variances, no chemicals, no physical changes to the wood (cutting, shaving, sanding). None of the stuff that's been tried. And it works, at least I'm convinced.

I'm going to take a guess, can't hurt! Besides, I have no reputation to protect. So.....

I think they are subjecting the instrument to sound. Loud intense sound, vibes of the frequencies found inherent in the guitar, for days and days. Not the kind of sound made by dynamite or that makes a room shake, but perhaps like that of a siren. Long, slow ascent and descent from low C to high G. Get the wood buzzing for a long period of time, so that when the strings are plucked, the wood gives (yields) easily to the energy produced by the string, instead of resisting the energy. Teach the wood to be an instrument and not a tree. Well, that's what I think.
Logged

A Hebrew, under the Spell
Pain is a good thing
The cost of living is...life
Danny
Donuts?
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 13250




Ignore
« Reply #16 on: October 09, 2010, 07:51:05 AM »

  I "WOOD" never do this to a guitar of mine. I have many ways of making them "aged" already. That's not what I really want to say though.

   When I picked up my F-III at the factory and played it then and there in Vancouver, I said YES! That's it! You did it, thank you Larrivee. I loved the tone of the Mahogany with an Italian Spruce top (1972 stash JCL find). And I still do after a year and a half. I know it will mellow and open more over the years, but frankly I hope it doesn't change too much.
   My F-IV on the other hand, being all hog needs to be played a lot and open more. It sounds very nice now, but will be better in a year or so.
    I have a Taylor Jumbo Maple with the biggest Engelmann spruce top I have ever seen. Which needs to be played in more to open the top up. But it sounds great right now. Like others have said it becomes your guitar by playing it. And that's the fun part.
Logged

O,OO,OOO,LS,D02
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to: