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Author Topic: 12 fret to 14 fret mental lag?  (Read 4410 times)
OutWithTheBlue
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« Reply #20 on: September 14, 2010, 04:47:19 PM »

There is something soooooooooo sweet about my 12 fret OO. I play the hell out of it and then go to my 14 fretters....no big lag at all, just have to remember my 12 fret isn'ti n my hands : )
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ncognito
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« Reply #21 on: September 15, 2010, 02:39:55 AM »

  Here is the link to the SCGC H-13.

www.santacruzguitar.com/instruments/h_model_cat/h13/h13_model.html

I wish I had not looked at it. Because now I really want one (again).

The pic is from the Folkway website.


I just noticed there's a 2004 near mint custom rosewood SC H-13 up on the bay.  Let the drooling commence.     drool

           DAVE
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« Reply #22 on: September 15, 2010, 02:37:22 PM »

  I wish I didn't know that. crying
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jimmyb
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« Reply #23 on: September 15, 2010, 05:37:13 PM »

Dave,

I own a 14 fret L-03, a 14 fret OM (Collings) with cutaway, and a 12 fret 00. There is a little adjustment in locating the octave, particularly on the cutaway, but apart from that, it's not too bad transitioning between the three. There are certain songs I play on each guitar and their voice are all different.

I find that the 12 fret 00 (Huss and Dalton) has a decidedly throaty tone, much like a trained operatic singer with a very open throat. The 00 is every bit as loud as the L or the OM, probably because the top is European Spruce and is braced for light gauge strings only. It's an amazing little guitar. The 14 fretters seem like the sound is at the front of the mouth (using the singer analogy).

Unfortunately I have never AB'ed the 12/14 fret identical guitars. That would tell all wouldn't it?

f

I had the chance to listen to an A/B of the same guitars, 12 verses 14 fret. It was some years ago at Gruhn's in Nashville. The 2 guitars were Collings: a D2H (14 fret rosewood dreadnaught) verses a D2HS (12 fret rosewood dread). I'm a lefty so, I was out front of the guitars listening to my friend play them. I thought the 12 fret guitar was CLEARLY better (as did my friend). It (the 12 fret) was richer, more balanced and just sweeter sounding, volume seemed about the same.

Jimmy
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sgarnett
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« Reply #24 on: September 21, 2010, 12:06:29 PM »

I have both 12 and 14 fret Larrivee OMs. As others have said, the sound is different. The main 12 fret adjustment for me is just backing off a little with my thumb on the bass notes.

I do have a very old (Depression era, I think) small-bodied guitar with 13 frets. I don't know who made it. For most of my life it was just a bundle of wavy, splintered kindling on Dad's walll, loosely held together by the strings. It was played by some great great uncles. The late Home Ledford did a remarkable restoration job for Dad that brought it up to somewhat playable, but you can only do so much when they are that far gone. The first time I brought it out and tried playing up the neck, it sounded very wrong. Oops, it actually has 14 frets. No, that's not right either, let's count them. 13???

12 doesn't bother me. 14 doesn't bother me. Electric guitars have necks that join at various frets, even within the same style, and that doesn't bother me. For some reason, 13 is more difficult to adjust to. I'm sure that I would get used to it quickly if I played the little relic more often, but it just isn't an everyday player.
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bluesman67
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« Reply #25 on: September 21, 2010, 01:49:48 PM »

I had the chance to listen to an A/B of the same guitars, 12 verses 14 fret. It was some years ago at Gruhn's in Nashville. The 2 guitars were Collings: a D2H (14 fret rosewood dreadnaught) verses a D2HS (12 fret rosewood dread). I'm a lefty so, I was out front of the guitars listening to my friend play them. I thought the 12 fret guitar was CLEARLY better (as did my friend). It (the 12 fret) was richer, more balanced and just sweeter sounding, volume seemed about the same.

Jimmy

Jimmy, I'm left handed as well.  I had a similar experience but all the guitars were lefties.  I was at Southpaw's in Houston, a place where every guitar in the store is left handed.  They had 2 Martin's OOO-15 and OOO-15S (14-fret and 12-fret).  Bottom line, I didn't even like the tone of the 14 fret but loved the 12 fret.  Now these were mahogany topped guitars, hogtops, and it made a huge difference.  The 12 frets seemed to come to life while the 14 frets seemed a bit muted and overall kind of dead sounding.
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bluesman67
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