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Author Topic: The Andy Griffith legend.  (Read 2303 times)
cc407
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« on: July 13, 2010, 06:16:28 PM »

So, he used a D-18 minus pickguard on the TV show.

Part of the lore says that it was painted for his role as Lonesome Rhodes in the film, "A Face in the Crowd"
and that he kept and refinished it. I've always accepted that.

So what's with this picture reported to be from the movie?



the pic came from here: http://www.dennisbaker.net/elia-kazan-face-in-the-crowd/

I guess I'll have to find a copy and watch the movie - but that aint no D-18!

Maybe more than 1 guitar in the movie?

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ronmac
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« Reply #1 on: July 13, 2010, 08:09:40 PM »

With a movie star's salary it is possible that he suffered from a little GAS.
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Ron

NotRevGDavis
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« Reply #2 on: July 13, 2010, 10:08:58 PM »

Many years ago I read the legend of that guitar but I can't remember where. A Face in the Crowd is a good watch, showed Andy could do more than the happy dad/sheriff gig.
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guitom
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« Reply #3 on: July 19, 2010, 06:20:29 PM »

I heard he pulled the D-18 out of the trash can after the movie was made.  I'm guessing there was more than one guitar in the movie.  Andy ain't no liar and I'll fight anybody who says he is!
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Danny
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« Reply #4 on: July 19, 2010, 07:35:18 PM »

   Thanks for this post I just ordered the movie from NETFLIX. The guitar in the picture looks a whole lot like a Stella I have. Mine is a 66 model. That would obviously be a early 50's at the oldest.
    I'll give a little report in a few days when I see the flick.
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Too many guitars... But I keep thinking one more may just do it.
cc407
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« Reply #5 on: July 19, 2010, 09:03:06 PM »

...  Andy ain't no liar and I'll fight anybody who says he is!

Now, now, you just calm y'self, Ernest T

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Danny
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« Reply #6 on: July 26, 2010, 08:07:15 PM »

  I saw the flick. Andy scared me ohmy   What a character.  The D-18 only shows up near the end and you only see the back. Actually looks more like a Gibson to me, but not much to see really.
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Too many guitars... But I keep thinking one more may just do it.
NotRevGDavis
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« Reply #7 on: July 26, 2010, 08:36:19 PM »

Wasn't Andy great in an evil role? Here is the first half of the press release for the Andy Griffith D-18

Martin Hails Andy Griffith With D-18 Signature Edition
 
From Mayberry To Matlock, Andy Griffith And His D-18 Have Played Their Parts Well

Andy Griffith, one of America’s most beloved actors, comedians and singers, has been a life-long Martin player and enthusiast.

His treasured 1956 D-18, in fact, has appeared in several of his movie, stage and television performances, beginning with his film debut in Elia Kazan’s A Face In The Crowd.

In that debut role, Andy played “Lonesome Rhodes,” a guitar-playing Arkansas rascal who rises from hobo to corrupt media star and king maker. The prop department (who obviously knew and cared nothing about quality guitars) painted a new Martin D-18 completely black and glued sequins spelling out “Lonesome” and “Momma” on its face. After the film was completed, Andy “rescued” the guitar from the movie lot and set out to restore it, carefully removing the sequins and sanding off the black paint to the bare wood (it took him nine days and the loss of the scroll decal and the pickguard in the process). He then took the D-18 to a small guitar shop he’d stumbled upon on New York’s lower east side and asked the shop’s owner if he could refinish the instrument. The proprietor was none other than John D’Angelico, the legendary archtop builder who refinished the D-18 to its original beauty, but at Andy’s request without a pickguard.

This guitar, Serial #148639, has remained Andy’s favorite Martin ever since. In the early ‘80s, a side crack was repaired, the scroll logo was restored, and a pickguard was added to cover some playing wear. Otherwise, the guitar is just as John D’Angelico handed it back to Andy in 1958.

An interesting sidenote: Blues great Brownie McGhee (of Brownie McGhee and Sonny Terry fame) had a small role in “A Face In The Crowd” and he and Andy became friends; after filming, Andy bought Brownie a D-18.
 
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Danny
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« Reply #8 on: July 26, 2010, 08:53:53 PM »

  Thanks for that clear, detailed post. The D-18 in the movie had keystone Klusons on it. But I guess Gibson wasn't the only one putting them on their guitars.
   
              That's a great story about his removing the paint and having it refinished by a legend.
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Too many guitars... But I keep thinking one more may just do it.
tubeornot2b
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« Reply #9 on: August 13, 2010, 09:48:44 PM »

who else first heard bluegrass courtesy of Andy Taylor and his jam sessions with the Darlin's (aka the Dillard's). Thanks Andy, I have loved that music ever since.
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Corky
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« Reply #10 on: August 13, 2010, 11:49:50 PM »

who else first heard bluegrass courtesy of Andy Taylor and his jam sessions with the Darlin's (aka the Dillard's). Thanks Andy, I have loved that music ever since.

This was an interesting session.  The Kentucky Colonels with Andy on his show.  A chance to see young Clarence White (with THE guitar) and his brother Roland on mandolin.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RpKhWePGNPc
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tubeornot2b
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« Reply #11 on: August 14, 2010, 12:47:05 AM »

corky great clip... thanks for the hot lead.
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