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Author Topic: Playing Electric Versus Acoustic  (Read 2210 times)
Strings4Him
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« on: July 29, 2010, 10:56:28 PM »

I am having a hard time getting used to my G&L ASAT Classic Bluesboy.  I love the sound.  However, it is heavier than my acoustic guitars.  Plus, I always seem to hit the control knobs when I am strumming.  I am almost ready to sell or trade this guitar!

Any thoughts from those who quite easily transition to and from playing electric and acoustic guitars?

 crying

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jimmyp
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« Reply #1 on: July 29, 2010, 11:08:40 PM »

Where are you strumming to hit the knobs?
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ducktrapper
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« Reply #2 on: July 29, 2010, 11:08:53 PM »

I started out with an electric guitar and have been playing both for 45 years. It takes time. They are two different creatures. It's not merely a loud acoustic guitar. I'm not sure what to tell you except with an electric guitar, you're really playing with the sounds coming out of the amplifier. It also might help to play it along with records or in a combo of some kind. With an electric, less is more. You see very little solo electric guitar playing that really works. Perhaps once you approach it from that aspect, it will make more sense. As for hitting knobs and stuff, that also just takes practice and getting used to whatever setup you have. That's a nice guitar, by the way, but if you think it's heavy you should shoulder a Les Paul or even my RS-4 for a bit.  Good luck.
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tuffythepug
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« Reply #3 on: July 30, 2010, 12:57:16 AM »

Like Duck said, they are two different creatures.   I play mainly acoustic but I like to shake the windows and rattle the walls occasionally.   As to hitting the knobs when strumming;   strum a little further towards the neck and with patience and practice this will occur less frequently.    I had the same problem;  kept hitting a volume knob un-intentionally.
Also, sometimes people who have played acoustic for a long time and then pick up an electric don't realize that you don't have to squeeze the heck our of the neck.    Light pressure is all that's needed for fretting an electric.   It took me a long time to realize this.    A nice guitar like yours probably requires very little pressure on the strings to get clean chords and notes.    

As far as the weight is concerned, that's something you just have to get used to;   or play sitting down.
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JOYCEfromNS
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« Reply #4 on: July 30, 2010, 01:37:18 AM »

Ya like anything else just PRACTICE and getting use to the setup. As far as weight this git is relatively light for an electric My RS 4 P90 is almost 11lbs and I luv every ounce of it!!!!!

Just takes some practice and getting use to really that's all. Lots of fun and as stated really a different animal from acoustic playing
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« Reply #5 on: July 30, 2010, 03:14:55 AM »

You can also do what I've done on mine and other tele-type have the control panel turned around.So you end up with the volumn control were the toggle is now.The setup become's volumn,tone then toggle.This set up also allow's for volumn and tone swells.
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« Reply #6 on: July 30, 2010, 03:30:04 AM »

I think everyone has said it, but it bears repeating. Electric and acoustic are two totally different animals. Your approach, technique, method, manner, and style is all changed. Don't think of it as an acoustic with a volume knob. Handle it as a different instrument with similar characteristics.
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« Reply #7 on: July 30, 2010, 03:32:35 AM »

Another thing that many tele players supposedly do is bend the switch at a 90 degree angle so that it doesn't stick up so high off the top of the guitar.  

http://www.tdpri.com/forum/archive/index.php/t-41859.html

You WILL get used to where to strum, and strumming electric is fundamentally different than strumming acoustic.  Do not sell the guitar because of this - all electrics have their own character which partly is learning where the controls are and taking advantage of those geometries.

I have two electrics, with completely different control layouts.  My first several months on strat, after a les paul type control setup were frustrating - seemed like those controls were always in the way.  After awhile, it becomes 2nd nature.

-Scott
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« Reply #8 on: July 30, 2010, 03:54:29 AM »

Everyone has really nailed it ... I can't add anything except, DON'T GIVE UP!!!

That's a gorgeous guitar, and a *tele* style guitar is very versatile, you can do everything from chicken pick'n to jazz on it (yes, fingerstyle jazz - really). So hang in there and you'll be rewarded over time with another wonderful instrument you can play (because it IS a different instrument from acoustic, as duck said).

Some jazz on a Tele by Canadian great, Ed Bickert:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bxPBvDYVX2w

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FSDZZ57LiqY&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?gl=ES&hl=es&v=t9mpJ2b2g2E
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« Reply #9 on: July 30, 2010, 01:40:16 PM »

Leo certainly got it right out of the Gate. Thanks Rev could listen and watch this genre all day. Really shows how simple AND VERSATILE this guitar design really is.

I know I would belly up should Larrivee put their slant on this design
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« Reply #10 on: July 30, 2010, 01:51:57 PM »

I love this one!

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Strings4Him
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« Reply #11 on: July 30, 2010, 10:43:43 PM »

To All,

Thanks for the wise advice!  This forum is great!!  I really appreciate the feedback.  I will stick with my G&L electric.


Thanks again,
S4H
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katieburton12
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« Reply #12 on: August 30, 2010, 06:37:01 AM »

Very interesting question. Well framed. Very interesting reading, too. I certainly came from a background sound. One of the strongest criticism, I play electric revieved was to stop trying to play like an acoustic guitar. I tried to scratch each beat and articulate each note. I think the electricity needed. I like the reference to the term fair range. I tried to investigate the range with my T5.
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Tycho
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« Reply #13 on: August 30, 2010, 09:51:23 PM »

You see very little solo electric guitar playing that really works.


Jeff Buckley's version of "Hallelujah" being a very notable exception.
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« Reply #14 on: August 31, 2010, 03:25:23 AM »

Strings4Him,

It's been another month since your last post...are you still playing the G&L?  Are some things getting easier (like not hitting the volume knob)? Are you finding some sounds you like, and some styles which the ASAT works for?

As duck said, not too many people can pull off playing the electric as a solo instrument (of course, there are notable exceptions; Ted Greene, Ed Bickert, and Joe Pass to name a few). Hopefully you're finding some ways to use it to add to your repertoire.

 nice guitar
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Strings4Him
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« Reply #15 on: August 31, 2010, 10:41:57 PM »

Thanks Mikeymac for the question.  I have played it since, had it for sale on the forum, and then decided to keep it.  It came down to wanting to have at least one electric guitar in the herd, so to speak.  The advice given by others above has been helpful, though.  I will keep pluckin' away.

Thanks again for checking in with me.
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Mountain Fever
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« Reply #16 on: September 01, 2010, 12:04:08 AM »

One thing that you might try as you perhaps take some of the very good advice about treating it completely differently is to turn the volume up considerably on the amp side and then try and play the electric more gently getting  a normal volume from the instrument.

Many of us who play mostly acoustic get into the (bad) habit of overstrumming/overplaying the electric. I think as you master this, you will actually see that you are able to get more in the way of string dynamics as when you really do dig in for emphasis, it changes the character of the tone a bit.

Just $.02 of FWIW advice.
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MrE
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« Reply #17 on: September 06, 2010, 07:30:22 PM »

I had to go the other way around. Looking at the guitar the volume knob is in a great position, you'll be damn glad it is where it is if you hook the guitar up to a tube amp with a compression pedal and use that volume as a gain knob to dial in sweet clean sounds on 2, slight break up on 3 to 4, crunch on 5 to 6, and rhythm and some lead on 6 to 8 with top of the shop for your solos and mayhem.

It takes time like everyone above has said. If I was learning electric all over again I would do some things different. First I'd buy a cheap tube amp for the bedroom ou can drive without shaking the house to bits, as that is a very important instrument in itself. Try to play so you  can't hear the guitar only the amp. Use head phones and an amp sim (I do at night and most days really) I'm using a line 6 ux2 and head phones for the night. Electric sounds very different in the mix to played on its own, can sound knarly on its own but in the mix its perfect. There are no rules only sound, but with the sound right down you'll play different because you'll be playing the guitar and not the amp.

Ps nice guitar.
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Strings4Him
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« Reply #18 on: September 06, 2010, 10:03:41 PM »

Thanks MrE.
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