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Author Topic: Martin Guitars  (Read 20506 times)
Danny
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« Reply #40 on: June 28, 2010, 10:43:14 PM »

Yes, I am enjoying the smell of my new custom OO-15SM from My Favorite Guitars!!
  Need some pics please.
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Too many guitars... But I keep thinking one more may just do it.
Strings4Him
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« Reply #41 on: June 28, 2010, 11:06:33 PM »

I just realized I forgot an "O."  It is a OOO-15SM.  Dan I will try to get some pics up sometime, but I will be quite busy for the next week or so  crying
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« Reply #42 on: June 28, 2010, 11:08:10 PM »

I think you have a 000-15SM, not a OOO-15SM. 

Just teasing.  Enjoy that sweet guitar!
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Play it daily for best results.
stuco
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« Reply #43 on: July 04, 2010, 03:37:32 AM »

 afro

Take away brand loyalty and they are just two companies who make very good guitars.
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Broadus
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« Reply #44 on: July 04, 2010, 05:57:17 PM »

Martin has the tone I enjoy hearing. I started learning almost three years ago as the typical geezer wanting to play guitar. I went through eight or nine guitars, including an L-03R and an OM-03R, before I bought my 2005 OM-21 last July. I had actually avoided Martins because I didn't want to be accused of buying for the name on the headstock. Since I've had my OM-21, though, I haven't seriously thought about another guitar since. I would love to add an LV down the road, but it wouldn't be to replace my OM-21.

Bill
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Martin OM-21; Eastman AC710S

The chief end of man is to glorify God and enjoy him forever. (Westminster Shorter Catechism---1647)
cke
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« Reply #45 on: July 04, 2010, 07:01:58 PM »

afro

Take away brand loyalty and they are just two companies who make very good guitars.
I find they (mostly) sound different from one another as a house sound. I like Martin ,the -18's on up, especially the vintage and GE types. Martins are  MY 2nd favorite guitars bigrin
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Chris
Larrivee's '07  L-09 (40th Commemorative); '09 00-03 S.E; '08 P-09
Eastman '07 AC 650-12 Jumbo (NAMM)
Martin   '11 D Mahogany (FSC Golden Era type)
Voyage-Air '10 VAOM-06
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Goya (Levin) '58 G-30
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Broadus
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« Reply #46 on: July 04, 2010, 08:06:39 PM »

afro

Take away brand loyalty and they are just two companies who make very good guitars.

I don't know if brand loyalty has much to do with folks loving Martins or Larrivees, for that matter. If Martin didn't make really good guitars, I doubt there would be much of a following. Some folks are going to buy a Martin because of the name on the headstock, to be sure, but that's because there is usually something worth having below the headstock, IMO.

Bill
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Martin OM-21; Eastman AC710S

The chief end of man is to glorify God and enjoy him forever. (Westminster Shorter Catechism---1647)
Danny
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« Reply #47 on: July 04, 2010, 08:07:30 PM »

I don't know if brand loyalty has much to do with folks loving Martins or Larrivees, for that matter. If Martin didn't make really good guitars, I doubt there would be much of a following. Some folks are going to buy a Martin because of the name on the headstock, to be sure, but that's because there is usually something worth having below the headstock, IMO.

Bill
    Ditto.
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Too many guitars... But I keep thinking one more may just do it.
stuco
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« Reply #48 on: July 05, 2010, 02:59:42 AM »

I don't know if brand loyalty has much to do with folks loving Martins or Larrivees, for that matter. If Martin didn't make really good guitars, I doubt there would be much of a following. Some folks are going to buy a Martin because of the name on the headstock, to be sure, but that's because there is usually something worth having below the headstock, IMO.

Bill

That's my point. 
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Broadus
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« Reply #49 on: July 05, 2010, 03:22:50 AM »

That's my point. 

I was a little confused as to your meaning, to be sure, so I took a stab at responding. At one time I was among those who thought most bought Martins because of the name on the headstock. Personal experience painfully taught me that was not necessarily the case.

Glad we're thinking alike. Sometimes I don't even agree with myself!

Bill
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Martin OM-21; Eastman AC710S

The chief end of man is to glorify God and enjoy him forever. (Westminster Shorter Catechism---1647)
Escalibore
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« Reply #50 on: July 05, 2010, 11:16:08 PM »

What are the qualities of Martin guitars that endeared itself to players?  I'm not asking to spite Martin owners but sincerely wants to learn about its uniqueness.  For example, I like Ovation guitars because of its unique design and sound (but can't describe it in words).  Have some  and  before chiming in. Thanks.

Martins are horrible. Only a cretin would own one.

Brett
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* Larrivee: L-09
* Martin: OM-42
* Martin: Custom Maury Meuhlheisen D-35
* Emerald: X7/OS Custom
* Gibson SG (x 2)
* Fender: American Standard Telecaster
* Epiphone: FT-130
* Epiphone: Sheraton2
Broadus
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« Reply #51 on: July 06, 2010, 12:54:45 AM »

Martins are horrible. Only a cretin would own one.

Brett

What about two? 

Bill
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Martin OM-21; Eastman AC710S

The chief end of man is to glorify God and enjoy him forever. (Westminster Shorter Catechism---1647)
stuco
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« Reply #52 on: July 06, 2010, 05:37:59 PM »

I was a little confused as to your meaning, to be sure, so I took a stab at responding. At one time I was among those who thought most bought Martins because of the name on the headstock. Personal experience painfully taught me that was not necessarily the case.

Glad we're thinking alike. Sometimes I don't even agree with myself!

Bill

 afro

I hear ya, my post probably didn't come accorss the way I intended. 
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dermot
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« Reply #53 on: July 06, 2010, 05:51:54 PM »


Quote
Martins are horrible. Only a cretin would own one.

Brett

Esp if they are the cheap crap ones like the OM42 & the D35MM.... i wouldn't want one of those, no how, no way, no sir.....

well... mmmmaybe if you twist my arm.....

d

 
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Escalibore
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« Reply #54 on: July 07, 2010, 01:31:05 AM »

Esp if they are the cheap crap ones like the OM42 & the D35MM.... i wouldn't want one of those, no how, no way, no sir.....

well... mmmmaybe if you twist my arm.....

d

 

Dermot and Broadus:

I wish someone would take these two Martins off my hands. This one is the most recent:





Brett
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* Larrivee: L-09
* Martin: OM-42
* Martin: Custom Maury Meuhlheisen D-35
* Emerald: X7/OS Custom
* Gibson SG (x 2)
* Fender: American Standard Telecaster
* Epiphone: FT-130
* Epiphone: Sheraton2
teh
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« Reply #55 on: July 07, 2010, 02:03:57 AM »

Thanks for torturing me. Love the center wedge and I'll bet it adds a whole new dimension to the sound. Too bad Maury's not around to see it.

That's also a great picture on the shelf in the white hat. Priceless actually.

Just wait until Larrivee creates a three piece back.
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TEH

Larrivee Parlor Flamed Maple
Larrivee LV-03 12 string w/ Mahogany Top 
Martin D-35 Shade Top
Martin OM-35 Sunburst
Martin 000-18 custom w/3 piece mahogany back, 12 fret slotted headstock
Martin Backpacker w/Nashville tuning
Oahu Square Neck
Escalibore
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« Reply #56 on: July 07, 2010, 02:32:06 AM »

Thanks for torturing me. Love the center wedge and I'll bet it adds a whole new dimension to the sound. Too bad Maury's not around to see it.

That's also a great picture on the shelf in the white hat. Priceless actually.

Just wait until Larrivee creates a three piece back.

Thanks for the kind words, TEH, especially the ones about my pride and joy (my daughter).

The center wedge, in addition to the Italian Alpine Spruce top has made this a very special guitar. It's rich, full, and a perfect balance between complex and articulate. It sounds great flatpicked, strummed or played fingerstyle.  This Maury Meuhlheisen D-35 is much, much more versatile than I thought it would be and is a perfect accompaniment for vocals. At a price point of roughly $2300 through My Favorite Guitars, I consider this model an absolute steal. I'd have paid another thousand for it.

BTW - You and I sure have similar taste in guitars. You've an impressive collection.

Brett
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* Larrivee: L-09
* Martin: OM-42
* Martin: Custom Maury Meuhlheisen D-35
* Emerald: X7/OS Custom
* Gibson SG (x 2)
* Fender: American Standard Telecaster
* Epiphone: FT-130
* Epiphone: Sheraton2
ice4351
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« Reply #57 on: July 14, 2010, 11:26:55 PM »

First of all let me say that I own 6 Martins.  Four of them are custom models.  Martin has a history of success for over 175 years that no other American guitar maker can claim.  They built the first dreadnaught guitars in about 1916 for Ditson.  The workmanship is great.  They are well known for a big booming sound from their bigger guitars and lifetime warranty to the original owners.  However, their smaller guitars are also awesome.  I visited the Martin factory in May of 2010 and was impressed to see that much of the guitar is still made by hand and that there are numerous quality checks. 
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Taylor Living Jewel "GSST Sea Turtle" Quilted Maple
Taylor XXXV-P Parlor Madagascar Rosewood
Larrivee L-10-FM Flamed Maple
Martin Ditson 111 Mahogany
tikabear
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« Reply #58 on: July 17, 2010, 09:17:28 PM »

A friend of mine has 3 Martins.  One is a 000R (I think) which is a solid top with laminated RW back and sides.  The others are an HD28 and a 00018.  All are 10+ years old.  He plays the 000R the most because he says is plays best and has the easiest action (it does).  It sounds much better than the 00018 which is very thin sounding IMHO.  The rosewood bridge and fretboard on the 00018 are real light in color unlike the HD28's board and bridge.  It sounds great and plays OK.  It could use a good set up.   I play it whenever I visit.  I would like a nice HD35 but only if I found one for a great price.  I think my Forum II and L03R sound just as good as all of them and 10x better then the 00018.  Of course he's a Martin guy and thinks they are the bees knees just because they are Martins.
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« Reply #59 on: July 18, 2010, 12:12:12 AM »

My perspective on Martins is a bit different -- and keep in mind as you read this that it's very much one person's perspective and worth exactly what you paid for it:

I don't think I've ever played a new Martin rosewood below the Cadillac 40s series (think D-45) that didn't sound congested. That said, I started playing in the '60s and bought into the rosewood-is-better theory, so rarely played mahogany, which is a very different ball game. To my ears Martins tend to sound overbuilt. This primarily means that the top is too thick and/or over-braced. This drastically reduces the number of warranty repairs, which is good for Martin, but severely limits how much sound they can put out in bass and treble (mahogany back/sides models excepted?). After the guitar dries out and gets played in over the years the bass gradually unfolds. Once this happens, the dread body shape and size together with this emphasis on bass results in a very credible flat-picking/bluegrass instrument.

The smaller Martin shapes have less amplitude to begin with due to the smaller resonance chamber. The reputation of the OM and similar for being well-balanced is fine, simply because the smaller resonance chamber reduces the bass so that bass, mid, and treble are closer to being equally quiet.

Because I lived in Toronto, working and teaching in an acoustic guitar specialty shop in the '70s, I had a bird's-eye view of the Larivée school as it unfolded (Larivée himself, David Wren, Linda Manzer, Sergei de Jonge, and Grit Laskin, come to mind). I have to say that initially, Larivée guitars seemed at least as overbuilt as the Martins. I bought a Larivée back then, but sold it within a year, being simply unable to drive enough amplitude out of it. Yet I really wanted to bond to that guitar, both because of the peerless workmanship and because Jean-Claude was such a darned likeable guy.

Fast-forward to 2010. After a few decades in hibernation my interest in steel string was recently rekindled, causing me to shop around to buy one. The shop my son recommended had a room full of acoustics in various price ranges, including Martin, Gibsons, Larivées, and Taylors at the solid wood end. I immediately gravitated to the brand new D-28 -- but, no: the sound hadn't changed a bit: still congested. A used Martin might have interested me but none were in sight. I found the Gibsons more attractive but at a higher price than I was willing to pay for mahogany b+s. I simply ignored the Taylors because I associated the name with funky bolt-on necks with no heel. My tendency was to ignore the Larivées, expecting them to have that overbuilt sound as well. But when I finally did try an L model I was blown away. I suspect my face turned pale in shock. The heft of the guitar told me it was built like a tank -- but the sound!

Alvinlam wrote:
> What are the qualities of Martin guitars that endeared itself to players?

For decades, especially after the Great Depression wiped out much of the guitar building industry, Martin was the one company that kept the faith by making an all-solid-wood instrument with faultless workmanship (workpersonship?). Martin was very much the Steinway of guitars. I'm sure this overbuilt thing I've been going on about was the result of a deeply felt internal struggle between wanting to put out the best possible instrument and needing to stay in business, as in avoiding death-by-repairs. In the '60s there wasn't a lot of choice for the guitar player. If you wanted a quality guitar you bought a Martin D-28 or D-35 whether you could afford it or not, then played it hard for as many years as it took for the sound to come in. We might have been smarter to buy a D-18 (the mahogany b+s model) or a Gibson, but if so we didn't know that.

Beyond that, Martin simply defined the bluegrass flat-picking sound with that nasal, twangy A and D string sound, and the cathedral bass of a played-in dread.
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