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Author Topic: Any chance of a Larry electric without a tune-o-matic type bridge?  (Read 6899 times)
rockstar_not
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« on: May 24, 2010, 12:28:42 AM »

I'm a hard-tail Fender fan.  However, I also love my L-03.  I've never got on with tune-o-matic/Gibson type bridges.  The only Gibson I've played that I really enjoyed was a Gibson Nighthawk.  I know that this keeps me from enjoying a big part of the electric guitar world, but that's the way that it is for me.  I don't like a big vertical change between where my palm rests on the saddle pieces and the top of the guitar.

So, is there any chance that Larrivee would consider a stop tail or at least lower profile bridge for people like me?

Anyone else out there that won't consider an RS-4 because of the bridge?
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« Reply #1 on: May 24, 2010, 01:48:54 AM »

what are some of the bridges you do like? give a few examples. Are you wanting something crazy like a floyd, or just something different like a hipshot?
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« Reply #2 on: May 24, 2010, 12:53:43 PM »

what are some of the bridges you do like? give a few examples. Are you wanting something crazy like a floyd, or just something different like a hipshot?

Just a good old Fender strat bridge works fine for me; I usually lock them down with extra springs, but that low-profile, without the sharp edges on the saddle pieces, is what I like.

This, of course, means that the pups are nearly flush with the top of the guitar as well.

-Scott
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« Reply #3 on: May 25, 2010, 02:29:54 PM »

I love a nice strat too but there's good reasons why a nice Les Paul or RS-4 or other high quality LP-ish guitars cost a lot more. I just glanced at my RS-4 and then my strat and I can't see it myself. The strat bridge is all about the use of the whammy bar, isn't it? If you're locking down the bar, I don't get why you'd want one on an RS-4. I can't imagine Larrivée is going there anytime soon. I would think they may introduce some strat-like guitars first. You would probably have a better shot, getting the hardware and doing the switch yourself. I'm tempted to say, just play a strat. So I just did. 
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« Reply #4 on: May 25, 2010, 04:39:32 PM »

Rockstar seems to be a true Fenderite the Palm feel is big with the Fenders. Have kinda wondered fror years why Gibson angles the neck and doesn't just contour the the top making the bridge right into the top with just adjustable metal inserts on the contoured bridge instead of a towering mass of metal to compensate for the neck angle.

Take the neck angle out make a contoured bridge carved out of the top with low mass saddles installed in the contoured bridge. IMHO you would have a nicer looking guitar, better sounding because of the wood and a better feeling for the palm easier to play and likely more attractive to strat lovers such as Rockstar. My two cents.
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« Reply #5 on: May 25, 2010, 06:58:33 PM »

Rockstar seems to be a true Fenderite the Palm feel is big with the Fenders. Have kinda wondered fror years why Gibson angles the neck and doesn't just contour the the top making the bridge right into the top with just adjustable metal inserts on the contoured bridge instead of a towering mass of metal to compensate for the neck angle.

Take the neck angle out make a contoured bridge carved out of the top with low mass saddles installed in the contoured bridge. IMHO you would have a nicer looking guitar, better sounding because of the wood and a better feeling for the palm easier to play and likely more attractive to strat lovers such as Rockstar. My two cents.

Well, the simple answer is, that would be a different guitar. I'm comfortable enough when, at times, I rest my palm on a tune-o-matic bridge. Then again, I've got a big ol' hunk of callous around seven o'clock on my lower right palm.
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« Reply #6 on: May 25, 2010, 10:19:29 PM »

Well, the simple answer is, that would be a different guitar.

Yup!!!

Maybe the simple question could be why do LP styles angle the neck thus requiring the towering mass of metal As in my limitations of guitar building theory there seems to be a relatively simple way around it. I'm the 1st to admit I must be missing something Any ideas?? Simple please BUT maybe not quite as simple as The Ducks
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« Reply #7 on: May 25, 2010, 10:40:12 PM »

Yup!!!

Maybe the simple question could be why do LP styles angle the neck thus requiring the towering mass of metal

I think the simple answer is that the Les Paul is the next step in the evolution of Gibson's big jazz guitars, which had tall bridges and angled necks! Then someone got smart and came up with the tune-o-matic bridge to correct intonation problems - add a solid body, now you're in Les Paul territory.

Leo started from a totally different place with the Tele (and remember, the Tele - or "Telly" as it used to be abbreviated in the old days - predates the Les Paul by a couple years)...he wanted to make a very practical guitar that could be amplified without feedback, and easily fixed if the neck warped. Not being a guitar player himself, Leo probably wasn't too worried about that whole jazz box neck angle thing...
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rockstar_not
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« Reply #8 on: May 26, 2010, 03:48:36 AM »

Rockstar seems to be a true Fenderite the Palm feel is big with the Fenders. Have kinda wondered fror years why Gibson angles the neck and doesn't just contour the the top making the bridge right into the top with just adjustable metal inserts on the contoured bridge instead of a towering mass of metal to compensate for the neck angle.

Take the neck angle out make a contoured bridge carved out of the top with low mass saddles installed in the contoured bridge. IMHO you would have a nicer looking guitar, better sounding because of the wood and a better feeling for the palm easier to play and likely more attractive to strat lovers such as Rockstar. My two cents.

Palm feel is it - it feels much more like an acoustic, actually - to me.  I realize that not everyone will agree with me on this.

If you grew up playing electric on a Fender like bridge (actually my first electric axe was a Peavey Milestone; think of a T-60 Peavey but in a Strat-like body).  The move to the Strat was easy for me - just a little more narrow fretboard, but much more tonal variety (mine is a Fat-Strat that I've rewired somewhat to give a master tone control and a variable tap on the bridge humbucker).  I've also put graph-tec saddles on the thing - haven't broken a string at the bridge ever again.

Every time I try a tune-o-matic bridged guitar, it just feels like my hand is suspended out in space without the reassurance of the top of the guitar right there at the ready.  And most tune-o-matic saddles are simply sharp on the palm - ouch; completely unnecessary! 

Now some of you are probably shaking your head and saying 'get used to it' or something to that effect, but I see arguments about the merits of 1/8" difference in neck width and so forth on the acoustic side of this board without any criticism.

I would love to have a Larrivee quality electric, with Fender style design as it pertains to the bridge and distance from the top of the guitar.  Plain and simple.  I would think there is just as many electric players that take a shine to this type of design as there are tune-o-matic players; perhaps even more.  Who can really say?

Oh, there was a comment about the 'whammy bar' as being what the strat is all about.  Not to me.  I bend my notes with my fretting hand, thank you very much.  If there were more hard-tail strats on the market, I probably would have bought one instead of the trem-bridge that I have.  It's also about body contour.  A strat hangs just right on me, belly scoop and all!

Anyway, I'm probably asking this question in the wrong place - I should be asking at the Larrivee site itself.
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« Reply #9 on: May 26, 2010, 04:38:58 AM »

Palm feel is it - it feels much more like an acoustic, actually - to me.  I realize that not everyone will agree with me on this.


Every time I try a tune-o-matic bridged guitar, it just feels like my hand is suspended out in space without the reassurance of the top of the guitar right there at the ready.  And most tune-o-matic saddles are simply sharp on the palm - ouch; completely unnecessary! 

Now some of you are probably shaking your head and saying 'get used to it' or something to that effect, but I see arguments about the merits of 1/8" difference in neck width and so forth on the acoustic side of this board without any criticism.

I would love to have a Larrivee quality electric, with Fender style design as it pertains to the bridge and distance from the top of the guitar.  Plain and simple.  I would think there is just as many electric players that take a shine to this type of design as there are tune-o-matic players; perhaps even more.  Who can really say?

Anyway, I'm probably asking this question in the wrong place - I should be asking at the Larrivee site itself.

Rockstar my use of the term palm feel was not meant to offend or degrade it's just what we call it my parts of the world - neither good nor bad. My brother is the opposite - he hates the fenders always inadvertently hitting the control knobs as he grew up on Gibsons.

I think it is a great topic and you are in the right place.  Tho this is mainly an acoustic forum because lets face it Larrivee was built on the foundation of their acoustics. BUT the electric guitar division at Larrivee I believe will be all the acoustic is and more and Matt LARRIVEE will be held in as high regard in the guitar world as Jean.

I believe as I stated in previous posts that Larrivee will eventually make a fender style as their Gibby styles are just that good and they are not stupid - a large percentage of the population/market prefer the fender feel and sound over the Gibby like yourself and then there is another large percentage who feel like my bro. I know if Larrivee does make a a fender style I will be 1st in line to get my hands on it. My Jeff Beck Custom Shop may very well gather a little dust. I sincerely believe that Larrivee make the best all around solid body electric guitar today I hope they venture to a strat or tele style.

Don't recall someone stating for you to just get use to it tho You will get guys like The Duck who can easily transition from Gibby to Fender and back without skipping a beat - hate those guys 

Interesting thread - certainly in a section of the forum that has a lot of upside
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« Reply #10 on: May 26, 2010, 04:51:59 AM »

I think the simple answer is that the Les Paul is the next step in the evolution of Gibson's big jazz guitars, which had tall bridges and angled necks! Then someone got smart and came up with the tune-o-matic bridge to correct intonation problems - add a solid body, now you're in Les Paul territory.

Leo started from a totally different place with the Tele (and remember, the Tele - or "Telly" as it used to be abbreviated in the old days - predates the Les Paul by a couple years)...he wanted to make a very practical guitar that could be amplified without feedback, and easily fixed if the neck warped. Not being a guitar player himself, Leo probably wasn't too worried about that whole jazz box neck angle thing...

Rev very interesting theory - thus even tho they came after the Tele they were based on "older" technology. I never thought of it that way. Wonder if my suggestion could work and what the end result would be
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« Reply #11 on: May 26, 2010, 12:01:35 PM »

Rockstar - "The strat bridge is all about the use of the whammy bar, isn't it?" Not quite the same as saying that playing a strat is all about the whammy. Anyway, I've hardtailed my strat, as well, but the strat bridge is a lot about a workable whammy bar and keeping the guitar in tune.
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« Reply #12 on: May 26, 2010, 03:56:34 PM »

Tho this is mainly an acoustic forum because lets face it Larrivee was built on the foundation of their acoustics. BUT the electric guitar division at Larrivee I believe will be all the acoustic is and more and Matt LARRIVEE will be held in as high regard in the guitar world as Jean.

I believe as I stated in previous posts that Larrivee will eventually make a fender style as their Gibby styles are just that good and they are not stupid - a large percentage of the population/market prefer the fender feel and sound over the Gibby like yourself and then there is another large percentage who feel like my bro.

I'm not so sure about Larrivee eventually making a Fender style guitar...even though they made Fender "shaped" guitars back in the '80's. You mentioned Matthew and Jean above, alluding to the evolution from the father to the son - and acoustic to electric - but this is exactly my point about the Les Paul. Gibson started out (as did Martin and other companies) as an ACOUSTIC guitar company, and their electrics evolved from their acoustics. Larrivee has not ignored their heritage in making the new RS-4 guitar; it's an extention of their acoustics: the body design looks like an evolution of the LV acoustic body, and the set neck and headstock follow very much in their acoustic tradition.

I suspect that Matthew might feel that building a bolt-on Strat style guitar would be "devolution," or to put it crassly, beneath Larrivee's level of skill and old world craftsmanship...Leo Fender had no such qualms.
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« Reply #13 on: May 26, 2010, 04:41:12 PM »

Though I prefer a simple wrap a round bridge/tailpiece on Gibson type guitars I've never had a problem muting either style.
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« Reply #14 on: May 26, 2010, 06:26:17 PM »

I'm not so sure about Larrivee eventually making a Fender style guitar...even though they made Fender "shaped" guitars back in the '80's. You mentioned Matthew and Jean above, alluding to the evolution from the father to the son - and acoustic to electric - but this is exactly my point about the Les Paul. Gibson started out (as did Martin and other companies) as an ACOUSTIC guitar company, and their electrics evolved from their acoustics. Larrivee has not ignored their heritage in making the new RS-4 guitar; it's an extention of their acoustics: the body design looks like an evolution of the LV acoustic body, and the set neck and headstock follow very much in their acoustic tradition.

I suspect that Matthew might feel that building a bolt-on Strat style guitar would be "devolution," or to put it crassly, beneath Larrivee's level of skill and old world craftsmanship...Leo Fender had no such qualms.

I wouldn't totally bet against it. There are some precedents. 


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« Reply #15 on: May 26, 2010, 08:52:22 PM »

I wouldn't totally bet against it. There are some precedents. 

Gotcha, duck ... but that was back in the pedal to the metal '80's. That guitar, along with some of the others Larrivee made at the time, reflected the market, which was heavy into metal and shred styles. I doubt they'll go back there again, and while that guitar has a Tele shape, it's not a bolt-on neck. It DOES have a flat bridge on it...but that was because many of these guitars had either Kahlers or Floyds on them, with a hardtail as an option.  I have my doubts that Larrivee will go there again.

If they prove me wrong, cool! 
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« Reply #16 on: May 26, 2010, 09:57:02 PM »

Time of course will tell. I just hope Larrivee spreads the luv to include those like Rockstar who have a preference for the Fender style.

I'm convinced like they did with the current RS 4 a new fender style will be everything and more to that style line. I see electric as a real growth potential for Larrivee as they are just too good at it for it not to be. Their marketing and endorsement side of business if it ever catches up to their building ability/quality will IMHO make Matt Larrivee a household name in the electric guitar world.

My $$$$ or  is on expansion way too good at building electrics not to.
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« Reply #17 on: May 27, 2010, 03:52:42 AM »

Rockstar - "The strat bridge is all about the use of the whammy bar, isn't it?" Not quite the same as saying that playing a strat is all about the whammy. Anyway, I've hardtailed my strat, as well, but the strat bridge is a lot about a workable whammy bar and keeping the guitar in tune.
Hate me all you want but I'm a switch hitter on guitar. Well, except for not playing left handed, that is. 

No hate intended.  It is just a surprise to me that there aren't more folks chiming in that there are merits to a Fender style that eclipse Gibson style in some ways.  I think you do have to admit that the bridge profile is much lower on a Fender style bridge than a tune-o-matic.

And I'm not saying playing Gibson style can't be done, like they can't be palm muted, etc.  I stated no such thing.  I've played an SG for goodness sakes and I liked it somewhat, but was pining for a lower profile bridge without sharp saddles the entire time I was playing it.

The comments about 'devolution' are pretty funny.  Two different guitars for two different purposes.  Still nothing like the quack of a strat in switch positions 2 and 4.

-Scott
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« Reply #18 on: May 28, 2010, 04:24:47 PM »

Of course, there are still old style RS-4s and such out there. Maybe you can track one of those down. Well worth your effort.

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« Reply #19 on: June 03, 2010, 12:03:46 AM »

Of course, there are still old style RS-4s and such out there. Maybe you can track one of those down. Well worth your effort.



Yes, but I like the rootbeer burst finish, and could do without the pointy headstock!  Imagine a rootbeer burst on a nice strat-like shape, with a more traditional looking headstock - something you couldn't put an eye out with.
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