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Author Topic: How to saw thin rosewood without chipping?  (Read 669 times)
frankhond
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« on: August 16, 2010, 08:34:15 PM »

I'm about to saw a thin piece of rosewood from Stewmac (actually it's a headplate that I'll cover a hole with) but before I do that - what is a good technique to avoid chipping and splintering? I would really like this to be a clean and nice cut.
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L07 Shooting Star
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« Reply #1 on: August 16, 2010, 09:08:14 PM »

You should have good success if you use a very fine razor saw or veneer saw.

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Danny
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« Reply #2 on: August 16, 2010, 10:16:21 PM »

   For real fine cutting I use a Japanese saw file. They are amazingly sharp and can cut so thin a line. I have not used it for anything very large though. Still it may help to have one for some of the fine details.
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« Reply #3 on: August 16, 2010, 10:19:18 PM »

Jim at Trinity or maybe unclrob would be the guys to ask, but I know that when I want to reduce end cut fall out I will tape over the wood I'm cutting, sticking blue tape to both sides of the wood, and cut through the tape.
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« Reply #4 on: August 17, 2010, 03:40:46 AM »

Dale said it all,well almost.Depending on the thickness of the veneer most of the time I use a diamond crusted jeweler's saw.Make sure is secure to another piece of wood that is clamped down so it won't wiggle with the cut line close to the edge of the piece of wood.
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jeremy3220
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« Reply #5 on: August 17, 2010, 04:58:53 AM »

Clamp another piece of wood beneath it and cut both at the same time if you want to use a bandsaw.
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frankhond
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« Reply #6 on: August 17, 2010, 11:54:18 AM »

Great advice, many thanks to you all. Looks like I have to make a trip to a toolshop.
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« Reply #7 on: August 18, 2010, 11:08:21 PM »

If it's a headplate overlay, your applying to headstock, and want to trim flush? Do I have that right..?

I'd flush rout it with a laminate router.
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frankhond
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« Reply #8 on: August 19, 2010, 07:56:41 AM »

If it's a headplate overlay, your applying to headstock, and want to trim flush? Do I have that right..?

I'd flush rout it with a laminate router.

I'm using part of the headplate to cover the barndoor hole in the side of my guitar (temporarily removed electronics). Thanks for the advice though, I haven't thought of looking at routers, and since I'm about to get some tools, this is now on my to-check list.
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