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Author Topic: oops, bone saddle, baggs removal..  (Read 1584 times)
frankhond
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« on: August 11, 2010, 01:17:44 PM »

I have installed my first Colosi bone saddle in my LV03RE, after removing the factory baggs electronics (the electronics I discuss in a different thread).

Basically I sanded the saddle fine except it's too thin. When I turn the guitar upside down it falls out. I can move it very slightly in its slot, and when strings are on, I can slip very thin paper in behind the saddle (the bridgepin side). So this is not great, although the guitar sounds pretty darn good.

What I would like to get some feedback on, is how to avoid this with saddle number two.

I used 180 gauge sandpaper followed by 600. I sanded a little with 180, a little with 600, tested, sanded, tested etc. Flat surface, just like the photos on Colosis instructions.

I really sanded very little between tests, especially when it looked like it was getting close. I must have tested the fit at least 20 times, when suddenly the saddle slid in and sat a bit loose. In fact, when I compare this new saddle to the old tusq one, there is no measurable difference in thickness. So what went wrong? Can you suggest a workflow which helps?

I was speculating that maybe the bottom of the saddle turned out a bit wider than the top, but I have no idea. Is there a magic grip to use when holding the saddle?

I should mention that the bottom turned out perfectly flat and the length of the saddle is perfect.

Any tips are appreciated.
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Michael T
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« Reply #1 on: August 11, 2010, 01:41:21 PM »

Go slower, check more often  crying Replace it, it is improtant it is a snug fit, you could damage the bridge with all that pressure pulling forward, kind of lever & fulcrum principle at work there. It's ok to have to use gentle pressure with pliers to get 'em out too. Gentle being the key word there.
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08 Larrivee L05-12
02 Larrivee DV-09
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ducktrapper
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« Reply #2 on: August 11, 2010, 02:53:40 PM »

From what I hear tell, those bone saddle bags are hard on the horse. 
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frankhond
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« Reply #3 on: August 11, 2010, 07:44:22 PM »

Go slower, check more often  crying Replace it, it is improtant it is a snug fit, you could damage the bridge with all that pressure pulling forward, kind of lever & fulcrum principle at work there. It's ok to have to use gentle pressure with pliers to get 'em out too. Gentle being the key word there.

Yeah, I'm ordering a new one, but this gets irritating. I looked again an I think I made the bottom a touch wider than the rest, and when trying for size, once the bottom slid in, the rest was too loose. On the other hand, the gryphon pro at frets.com starts a sentence with "...and when I accidentally make them too narrow, I just start over...".   
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tuffythepug
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« Reply #4 on: August 11, 2010, 09:09:26 PM »

The first Colosi saddle I attempted to install in my OM-03R went into the wastebasket when I realized I took too much off.   You live and learn.   The second one, and all subsequent ones went smoothly once I realized I needed to slow down and take off just a little at a time and to check the fit often.  I'm sure you'll nail it on the next one.
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zpcm04
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« Reply #5 on: August 11, 2010, 09:20:17 PM »

I recently purchased a bone saddle from Bob.  Have not installed it yet, but did notice it appeared very close in size to my existing one.  I used a verier caliper and found it to be within a few thousands of an inch oversize from the original (i.e., not much sanding needed).  I decided then that I would use a finer grit sandpaper than what was recommended, just to slow down the process.
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frankhond
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« Reply #6 on: August 12, 2010, 12:42:30 PM »

I'll do the second one this weekend. I certainly hope that this time I'll be able to avoid inadvertently sanding off my nails in the process.  rolleye
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webberink
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« Reply #7 on: August 12, 2010, 09:50:15 PM »

I have used a layer of clear magic tape on the back of the saddle, cut so as it just comes up to the top of the saddle slot, to fit a slightly loose saddle.  Guy at LR Baggs told me about it and it worked like a charm. FWIW.
Dave
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I love those older Canadian made Larrivees!
frankhond
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« Reply #8 on: August 13, 2010, 08:58:51 AM »

I have used a layer of clear magic tape on the back of the saddle, cut so as it just comes up to the top of the saddle slot, to fit a slightly loose saddle.  Guy at LR Baggs told me about it and it worked like a charm. FWIW.
Dave

Hm, nice! Will try that immediately.
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frankhond
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« Reply #9 on: August 13, 2010, 11:58:30 AM »

I found this quote "If the saddle is too loose, a good approach is to apply thin layers or CA glue to one side of the saddle, let dry, sand flat, and check the fit." on this site : http://www.pick-uptheworld.com/ust.htm

Interesting, might be a good alternative as well. What do the pros think? CA glue has been used in surgery...

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