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Author Topic: Picks!  (Read 1555 times)
DaveyO
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« on: October 31, 2009, 12:19:32 AM »

What do you use?
thin, med, heavy , xtra heavy,
fender, dunlop,
tortoise shell, crazy color plastics.
tell me why you use what you use.

by the way, I try others and go back to  fender medium tortoise shell.
My brother uses a Fender xtra heavy!
for both acoustic and electric guitar
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flathead
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« Reply #1 on: October 31, 2009, 12:40:03 AM »

I've tried quite a few different picks and I always come back to the Fender medium. I think the reason may be that my style of playing was learned with  the fender medium, and my ear was trained with  them also. I like the tone you get with other picks sometimes, but I always come back to "my" pick.
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« Reply #2 on: October 31, 2009, 01:28:59 AM »

When I use a pick its a genaric fender med.
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itscowfun
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« Reply #3 on: October 31, 2009, 02:32:00 AM »

i used to use dunlop nylons but as of late my favorite for picking and hybrid picking TE stuff is the cool picks "cat tongue" red in 0.73mm.  sooo goooodd
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« Reply #4 on: October 31, 2009, 04:31:52 AM »

I use different picks for different string guages,as well as guitars.For my OM's(light guage) I like .88 Star Picks.

  For my light string guage Larri Dread,I use a combo of .73 Star Picks,and medium Celluloid.The Cellulois really sounds great on this guitar,for some reason.

  For my medium guage strung Bourgy dread I prefer .96 Star Picks....I also use Propik finger picks for my crappy(but getting better) finger picking-:)

  Personally,I find this a very interesting topic...especially as UMGF has really gotten into this subject,and many of those folks are quite experienced(not that folks here are not....I am sure they are)...I'm curious as to the benefits of stuff like Wegen,Red Bear,and Blue Chip picks,now that I realize just how much the sound can be "shaped" by a pick....As far a tortoise shell is concerned...I'm giving those critters the respect they deserve,and will never know...

  Still,I am not going to invest anymore moola until my technique improves.

  Good luck
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mas music
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« Reply #5 on: October 31, 2009, 06:38:34 PM »

Finger picking is really my forte. From my perspective the less the pick gets in the way the better. I find it easier to strum more fluidly with a thin pick. I use Dunlop Tortex .50 mm at home and Dunlap Gatorgrip .58 for performance as it has a bit more power without feeling to stiff. In my opinion these picks are not slippery or stiff so they feel more natural to the touch. I am sure a good platpicker has a very different perspective and so it goes.   
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Johnny M
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« Reply #6 on: October 31, 2009, 10:03:14 PM »

I started using a Wegen pick that came with my son's mandolin.  It's probably about a 1.5.  Nice fat tone and great from heavy strumming and living room flatpickin'.  I think it works really well on the mandolin as well.  If I want it a little more snappy, I'll use a Dunlop .96mm.  It took me a while to get up to the fat pick and thought the tone sounded too fat when I first tried it.  Now I love it.  It's amazing how much a pick can affect and shape the tone.  We spend a lot of money on things that don't affect tone (bindings, pickguards, tuners, etc.,)  but I balk at the thought of paying more than a couple of bucks for a pick. 
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« Reply #7 on: October 31, 2009, 11:53:44 PM »

My favorite are EBE glow-in-the-dark Alien Heads - I think heavy.
They work best. It's Alien Technology, you know.
I Also use Fender medium.
When I want a softer sound I use Dunlop nylon in .73mm
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djc227
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« Reply #8 on: November 03, 2009, 04:21:49 AM »

I had never really found a pick I liked until I got a chance to play a genuine tortoiseshell pick that I bought from a guy on another forum.  (No PETA bashings please, the tortoiseshell was 100 years old and made from an antique brush)  I could not believe the difference in tone and playability.  It's about 1 to 1.2 mm with a speed bevel.  It really is worth the hype.  I'm not condoning the killing of turtles for picks, but if the Red Bear and Blue Chip picks really do sound the same, I would not hesitate to pay the $20-35 to buy one.  I'll never go pack to a regular pick again.  I have fender and another brand of the same thickness and style that makes the guitar sound muddy, but the TS makes it sing like you wouldn't believe!
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« Reply #9 on: November 03, 2009, 06:03:39 AM »

Dunlop Gel picks. M or M-L depending on style of play.  I really like them and they are inexpensive.
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Dr.Lee
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« Reply #10 on: November 06, 2009, 01:28:46 PM »

I started using a Wegen pick that came with my son's mandolin.  It's probably about a 1.5.  Nice fat tone and great from heavy strumming and living room flatpickin'.  I think it works really well on the mandolin as well.  If I want it a little more snappy, I'll use a Dunlop .96mm.  It took me a while to get up to the fat pick and thought the tone sounded too fat when I first tried it.  Now I love it.  It's amazing how much a pick can affect and shape the tone.  We spend a lot of money on things that don't affect tone (bindings, pickguards, tuners, etc.,)  but I balk at the thought of paying more than a couple of bucks for a pick. 

I have gone through a million picks. They all sound different. Even picks from the same dozen sound different. And measure them! I bought a dozen Clayton picks about 1mm, they measured different sizes, with all different sound, even with the ones that measured the same sounded different. Thats when I sprang for the extra bucks for the Wegens. I use the Triangle shape the most, 1.4mm but have 1.0mm and 1.2mm. The all sound great, less pick clatter. They are supposed to be made from Kevlar. Maybe that accounts for the tone. So far I love them.

 Dr.
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« Reply #11 on: November 12, 2009, 04:22:20 AM »

Depends on the style:

For light strumming:  Dunlop nylon .38 mm - just brushes the strings.
General purpose strumming:  Dunlop nylon .88 mm
Melody picking:  Dunlop nylon 1mm

I keep one of each of these in my wallet's coin purse at all times.  They last forever.  I've had the trio that's in there several years, in use a few times a week.

For my electric playing, I typically reach for the nylon .88 mm, or a Dunlop 500 .71mm - though the point on that one is getting worn down.

I have been trying to wean myself off of the .38 pick for light strumming and going for more control with the .88mm
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misterneutron
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« Reply #12 on: November 17, 2009, 12:24:10 AM »

Great Pick Demo on YouTube.

Includes real tortoise, Wegen, Fender standard, Clown Barf (my personal favorite).

BTW, this is my instructor - check out his other music vids on YouTube.
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Dotneck
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« Reply #13 on: November 17, 2009, 12:31:26 AM »

I've liked the Big Stubby for the past couple years...



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« Reply #14 on: November 19, 2009, 07:53:41 AM »

Great Pick Demo on YouTube.

Includes real tortoise, Wegen, Fender standard, Clown Barf (my personal favorite).

BTW, this is my instructor - check out his other music vids on YouTube.

Now THERE'S proof to the non-believers of the importance of pick choice!
Thanks.
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“Your lack of technique can be part of your style. The thing about style is that it’s more entertaining, more important and hopefully more intellectual than technique.”
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« Reply #15 on: November 19, 2009, 08:12:53 AM »


BTW, this is my instructor - check out his other music vids on YouTube.

Like this one:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wrSg6OGHKOY&NR=1

You are fortunate to have HIM as an instructor...
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Three Larries and a Guild and an A&L...and electrics...and a mando

“Your lack of technique can be part of your style. The thing about style is that it’s more entertaining, more important and hopefully more intellectual than technique.”
Kim Thayil (Soundgarden)

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« Reply #16 on: November 19, 2009, 07:58:08 PM »

I do feel fortunate...it was really dumb luck finding him.

He's scary good, and is more of a musical mentor than mere guitar teacher.

He plays all the time in various venues around town. If you are ever in Portland Oregon, come check him out.

Also has two CDs out - all fingerstyle Jazz.   I don't mind providing a shameless endorsement if the music is good!

Eric Skye

Cheers,

Tom
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