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Author Topic: Roland VS-880 Xpanded - Acoustic guitar  (Read 1633 times)
zurdillo
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« on: August 26, 2009, 05:00:29 PM »

Hello,

I have a doubt that your experience sure can solve.

I'm starting to recording my acoustic guitar. I think I need gear with only two channels for recording with to mics. I have seen that there are several options. I have clear that I want a good sound, not a basic one and not professional, for recording good guitars.

I have some gear and I don't know if is good idea keep using in my new record chain.

I have a dinamic microphone Shure Beta 57A (poor for acoustic guitars). I know that condenser mics will do better job with a acoustic guitar, and that small and large diaphragm will obtain different results. I have three ideas here:

- A matched pair of Oktava MK-012 for stereo recording.
- A matched pair of Rode NT5 for stereo recording.
- A OKtava MK-012 (or Rode NT5) and a large diaphragm one like a AKG C3000 or similar.

Somebody can give a advice in this point?

The second doubt is about my digital mixer-recorder Roland VS-880 Xpanded. There are some pros and cons here.
Pros: until 64 channels,  good effects, durable, good quality.
Cons: only 18bits/48Khz recording, output RCA, SCSI and digital (no USB or Firewire), no Phantom power.

My doubt is, is a good idea to keep this mixer or is a true fossil? Is there a adapter from RCA, SCSI or digital to USB or Firewire?
Is a good recording resolution 18bits/48Khz in this days?

And the last one, do I need a dual preamplifier like a Golden Mic, a Focusrite or similar or for a basic-medium Home Studio will be sufficient with a more basic gear?

Excuse me for the long message and thank you for read this post.

Any advice will be wellcomed. 

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dbirchett
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« Reply #1 on: October 12, 2009, 03:33:46 AM »

There are many people using SM-57s that would disagree with your statement about the Beta version being a poor choice for miking acoustic guitar. Its not a condensor but its still a pretty danged good mike for that purpose.
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zurdillo
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« Reply #2 on: October 12, 2009, 08:21:19 AM »

I assume that anyone can have its own experience. My experience with this nice mic is that is more suitable for other instruments like winds (I have worked with recorded ensembles with very nice results using my Beta 57A) and the mic must be too much close to the guitar for obtain a good sound, and this is not comfortable for playing.

I have a friend (flute and sax player) who own a SM57 and uses it for recording all instruments including my classical and acoustic guitars. I don't know if is his ability but he obtain better results with his SM57 that I with my Beta 57A (we record both in the same SIAB).

Greetings.
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rockstar_not
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« Reply #3 on: October 12, 2009, 01:45:59 PM »

18 bits and 48 kHz should be sufficient.  Does the Roland have any built-in mic pre-amps?

You don't necessarily have to spend a huge amount of money to get a decent mic pre-amp.  For example, the Studio Projects VTB-1 is a great single-channel pre-amp (I would suggest learning how to record a great mono track before delving into stereo) that can be purchased for $140 here in the US.  It has excellent Signal to Noise for it's gain.

Also consider ART products for very good performance for the price.

Some of the newer ART pre-amps have an analog to digital converter built in as well as a USB interface - allowing you to record directly to a laptop or desktop computer.

http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/USBDualPrePS/
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zurdillo
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« Reply #4 on: October 12, 2009, 08:46:07 PM »

Yes, the Roland has built-in preamps but it seems that are not of very hight quality (I don't obtain too much volume directly from the mics and I have to put the "input sens" knob at highest level, and this produce hum), I think the solution perhaps is a stereo preamp. Thank you for the advice about starting with recording in mono tracks, I think you are right. I have some experience recording in mono, I think is time to starting to stereo, but is a real issue.

Thank you for the advice about the VTB-1 and Art, I will look this preamps.

Greetings!
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