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Author Topic: Are you happy and confident with your own voice?  (Read 3491 times)
rpm60912
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« Reply #20 on: May 12, 2009, 08:00:33 AM »

I'm not much of a singer either, just happy I could keep singing on key.  There are only certain keys that suit my voice, or I sound like a violin in the hands of a beginner (okay, I hope, I sound slightly better).

I find it draining and stressful when I have to look at the words and chords. I prefer to memorize the lyrics and chords (which does not come natural for me) - if I don't do this, I can't sing from my heart --- and if I can't feel the song, it takes more effort and energy to sing and play guitar at the same time. When I can sing and play from my heart, it seems effortless and more enjoyable.

Now, there are those who sing great and their fingers automatically form the chords as natural as breathing - awesome!

I just practice and memorize and feel --- until I know I've mastered playing the chord progression in the guitar until instrument playing and voice singing are seamless together.

Lots and lots of practice... and with an audience and on-stage butterflies, I still fumble; but I'm learning not to be too hard on myself and not to take myself too seriously --- I just sing and enjoy and hopefully the audience like what they hear.

I should go to sleep.

ricky
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fongie
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« Reply #21 on: May 13, 2009, 04:30:34 AM »

I only write instrumentals but that's because my lack of confidence is in writing lyrics.  I love to sing and I think I've got a pretty decent voice.  I'll let you be the judge.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z9bELRAixXU

This is the only video I have of me singing.  I should really make more.

Dennis, see what you've started, my fingers especially my pinkie are totally deformed playing this song. But I'm glad 'cause it's comin' on great. Don't know about the singin', gosh it's a hard song to sing. I gotta hand it to you, you sang it very well, especially the hich notes on the chorus.
cheers
fongie
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« Reply #22 on: May 13, 2009, 09:15:34 AM »

Can anybody tell me what those paddings attached above the bottom bouts of Denis's guitar are called? And where can I purchase these? Thanks
cheers
fongie
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tuffythepug
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« Reply #23 on: May 13, 2009, 03:59:43 PM »

After reading these posts for a few days I decided to chime in just for fun.     the short answer is, no, I'm not happy or confident in my own siinging voice.  But I'm more confident than I used to be.   
At one time I would never sing in front of anyone and hated my own singing voice.   I joined a couple of friends for some regular jam sessions at my house and I was made to be the vocalist since the other two were so much better guitar players;  they made me play rhythm and handle most of the vocals.  I made myself do it and over time I became more confident, and less inhibited;  learned how to breath and how to phrase;  kind of developed my own style so that it felt more natural.  Singing into a microphone can be un-nerving at first.    I've found that I do a passable job if I play and sing in my comofort zone and play guitar chords and passages that are familiar enough that I can do it with my eyes closed.  And, in fact that's the way I usually sing;  with my eyes closed and in my head I'm seeing the images that the words are describing as I sing them.   In that way I get inside the song and forget what is happening outside of it.    One thing I've noticed is that being tense and nervous feeds on itself.   Tension causes you to strain at notes and they sound thin which makes you more nervous and sefl concious making your strain even more.  Learning to relax is hard but essential to having a natural sounding singing voice in my view.
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fongie
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« Reply #24 on: May 13, 2009, 10:23:28 PM »

After reading these posts for a few days I decided to chime in just for fun.     the short answer is, no, I'm not happy or confident in my own siinging voice.  But I'm more confident than I used to be.   
At one time I would never sing in front of anyone and hated my own singing voice.   I joined a couple of friends for some regular jam sessions at my house and I was made to be the vocalist since the other two were so much better guitar players;  they made me play rhythm and handle most of the vocals.  I made myself do it and over time I became more confident, and less inhibited;  learned how to breath and how to phrase;  kind of developed my own style so that it felt more natural.  Singing into a microphone can be un-nerving at first.    I've found that I do a passable job if I play and sing in my comofort zone and play guitar chords and passages that are familiar enough that I can do it with my eyes closed.  And, in fact that's the way I usually sing;  with my eyes closed and in my head I'm seeing the images that the words are describing as I sing them.   In that way I get inside the song and forget what is happening outside of it.    One thing I've noticed is that being tense and nervous feeds on itself.   Tension causes you to strain at notes and they sound thin which makes you more nervous and sefl concious making your strain even more.  Learning to relax is hard but essential to having a natural sounding singing voice in my view.
Tuffythepug


So true Tuffy, everything you've mentioned above makes a whole lot difference, especially being tense and nervous, thats happened to me many of times. One problem I do have is, memorising lyrics in a song to sing without the paperwork. I can play guitar and sing together, but totally hopless with out the lyrics in front of me.
Can anybody view Denis's video above, and tell me what you call that pad thats attached above his lowerbout on his guitar, and where can I buy it? Thanks
cheers
fongie
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Danny
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« Reply #25 on: May 14, 2009, 12:05:17 AM »

                          If you sing with all the feeling you got...only a fool would say something derogatory.                                                                                                        (Or a music teacher ;-)
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« Reply #26 on: May 14, 2009, 01:09:35 AM »

As Maya Angelou said:

"A bird doesn't sing because it has an answer, it sings because it has a song."

I also found Harry Chapin's rendition of "Mr. Tanner" which tells the story of someone who just loved to sing.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ea6cgfU8bC4&feature=related
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« Reply #27 on: May 14, 2009, 12:10:18 PM »

Can anybody view Denis's video above, and tell me what you call that pad thats attached above his lowerbout on his guitar, and where can I buy it? Thanks
cheers
fongie

That's called a guitar armrest, and it's usually a wooden piece that's custom-fitted to the guitar.  Some manufacturers offer them as an option, but John Pearse has a selection.  Check out
    http://www.jpstrings.com/braccess.htm#Armrest-n

Other places make them too, but I've never used one and can't say much beyond the above.  If you're interested, might want to start a thread on "Armrests"

Dave
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BluesMan1
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« Reply #28 on: May 14, 2009, 06:03:55 PM »

   Scott, I can't believe what I sound like talking! I actually have had confidence in my singing for years until I stopped smoking ciggies. Must have done something to my vocal chords, because my voice breaks up alot now, which I thought would have happened before (when I smoked;think it made my chords tighten & sang better then). I always have some water nearby, which seems to help. I always sang in public, with confidence, until about 10 yrs. ago, when I did the deed & stopped smoking. In college, around '95 (went back @ 35), for my public speaking class, I did a little thing on the blues & sang 2 songs. Had spoken with the instructor about my stuttering problem, which I can hide well, but would probably freeze in front of the class. Did as little speaking as possible, just explaining the history of blues briefly & how they are actually a release of them. Don't stutter when I sing, so no problems there. Had none either playing & singing in front of everyone. Had done that before. I used my Dana Bourgeois OM for that, which is long gone.
   Just have to sing in the right key, which is important as mentioned. Have problems in certain keys, not so much in others. Will still sing, but lack the confidence of how it sounds to others now. If it sounds half decent, someone will always like it! Just have to have more than one person there!
     Jeff   
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fongie
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« Reply #29 on: May 14, 2009, 10:43:56 PM »

That's called a guitar armrest, and it's usually a wooden piece that's custom-fitted to the guitar.  Some manufacturers offer them as an option, but John Pearse has a selection.  Check out
    http://www.jpstrings.com/braccess.htm#Armrest-n

Other places make them too, but I've never used one and can't say much beyond the above.  If you're interested, might want to start a thread on "Armrests"

Dave

Thankyou so much Dave, this is truely wonderful, I will pursue this. Yes, I will start a new thread few questions I need to ask.
cheers
fongie
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obe-wan
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« Reply #30 on: May 19, 2009, 12:10:16 PM »

I only write instrumentals but that's because my lack of confidence is in writing lyrics.  I love to sing and I think I've got a pretty decent voice.  I'll let you be the judge.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z9bELRAixXU

This is the only video I have of me singing.  I should really make more.



Stop showing off Denis !


Just jokin mate, youre a fine singer, and the the playing...well.....see above!

Cheers, Scott.

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« Reply #31 on: May 24, 2009, 02:42:46 PM »

                          If you sing with all the feeling you got...only a fool would say something derogatory. ...
+1
As a general rule, I've found that if someone is singing honestly,
as tho' their life depends on it, then I'm likely to enjoy it.

I've heard many technically adequate (or better) vocalists
with pretty voices that I don't enjoy, 'cause the emotion
isn't there.

For myself, I very rarely manage to record a track that doesn't make me cringe
during playback, but I still enjoy singing, don't plan to stop, and usually get
a good response when I go to the weekly open mike.

Here are a couple 'sketches' of recent tunes that I'm not unduly dissatisfied with:

Music Soothes
Religious Retread Blues

Cheers,

 - Richard
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« Reply #32 on: May 24, 2009, 04:36:32 PM »

I've always love singing, mainly backups, even with my crappy voice, but never confident enough to sing into a mic. or solo in front of onlookers, let alone hear my own voice, untill last night. Though, it still sounded crappy, I totally enjoyed it. Infact, I enjoyed it so much, I'm giving it another go today. It's given me so much confident in my voice and singing ability. I know this subject has been posted before, but give us your view anyway......

If you want to be confident and excellent as a singer, when you sing, concentrate on singing. Too many guitarists worry about the nifty guitar parts and tricky little riffs. Then they sing in a key that they can't sing in. They won't change the key of the song because they don't want to lose the guitar parts. When they sing, they treat singing like an after-thought. When you pick a song, sing it without a guitar - record it if you can and listen to it. If you can't sing it comfortably, then change the key that you play it in. If the guitar parts sound great in "G" but you have to sing in A# or F, you may have to re-arrange the song completely. 95% or more of the audience doesn't care. If you're singing, that's what the audience is focused on. You can actually stop playing at times and they won't even notice.
I sang quite badly for years because I thought I had to sing in the key that was on the original recording or in the key that the guitar riffs sounded best in. When I turned professional, I had a bunch of original tunes that our producer made us change so our voices would excel. It made all the difference in the world. Vocally we sounded better than we expected we could and it made all four of us confident in our singing in every song. After ten years on the road, my voice still worked. If we hadn't learned to focus on singing comfortably in the right key, when we started a decade of virtually non-stop touring, our vocal chords would have been shot in a matter of months.

dg


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fongie
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« Reply #33 on: May 26, 2009, 09:53:19 AM »

If you want to be confident and excellent as a singer, when you sing, concentrate on singing. Too many guitarists worry about the nifty guitar parts and tricky little riffs. Then they sing in a key that they can't sing in. They won't change the key of the song because they don't want to lose the guitar parts. When they sing, they treat singing like an after-thought. When you pick a song, sing it without a guitar - record it if you can and listen to it. If you can't sing it comfortably, then change the key that you play it in. If the guitar parts sound great in "G" but you have to sing in A# or F, you may have to re-arrange the song completely. 95% or more of the audience doesn't care. If you're singing, that's what the audience is focused on. You can actually stop playing at times and they won't even notice.
I sang quite badly for years because I thought I had to sing in the key that was on the original recording or in the key that the guitar riffs sounded best in. When I turned professional, I had a bunch of original tunes that our producer made us change so our voices would excel. It made all the difference in the world. Vocally we sounded better than we expected we could and it made all four of us confident in our singing in every song. After ten years on the road, my voice still worked. If we hadn't learned to focus on singing comfortably in the right key, when we started a decade of virtually non-stop touring, our vocal chords would have been shot in a matter of months.

dg




So true......I agree. Thanks
cheers
fongie
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« Reply #34 on: June 22, 2009, 01:24:00 AM »

Wow that was some nice performing on youtube. 
Excellent forum to hear others with so much talent expressing their challenges and short comings. Far more credit is due, I'm quite sure of that.
Me, with my whole year and a bit of playing is hilarious, BUT, I love playing and singing. If it wasn't for that I would go back to just listening. I heard my guitar plugged in about 4 months ago for the first time and my voice over a mic 2 months ago. Yowsa, it was rough. Like I said I love learning to make music so much that I just smile at my friends and say, "it can only get better" I have since bought an amp and decent mic for practicing.
My daughters are actually taking to singing into the mic now too. That is a huge bonus.  +1
My daughters are actually inviting friends over to sing while I play along. Good times. Of course we have background music to help things along. 

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Let the good times roll
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« Reply #35 on: June 22, 2009, 03:28:32 AM »

Hi BigE, thats fantastic, and thanks for ya' nice post. Yes, thats fantastic to know how you've included your girls and their friends into your mini home band. Thats just wonderful, isn't it? I too, just recently bought myself a Peavey 150 watt, 4 channel, Amp/mixer and pair of 300watts Skytec speakers for my own home use. I've now added backing tracks through the amp and tell ya', it's so much fun. Just plug in the git and mic and add in the backingtracks, and away you go or if I want to play my drums, just go for it. Just like a 'Claytons Drink', 'When your having a drink, but not having a drink', well this is 'When your playin' in a band, but not playin' in a band'  bigrin I've downloaded hundreds of backingtracks for free and also use Kareoke CD's (not as good), and play it through a DVD player into my amp, sounds fantastic, nothing better then having a backup.
cheers
fongie
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« Reply #36 on: June 22, 2009, 07:11:03 AM »

I'd been following this thread with interest, but not much to contribute since I don't sing - and certainly was never happy/confident in my voice - in fact I've been told since school that I can't sing/was tone deaf etc.

Well, thanks to inspiration from reading and hearing you folks on here - particularly BenF and what he has put out recently, I finally plucked up the courage to record myself playing/singing a song I had been working on.  The first shot didn't sound disastrous, so kept at it.  After many different takes (and a couple of glasses of wine), one actually sounded OK.  Although its not ready to post up here, I was pleasantly surprised by the outcome, and it has given me enough confidence and encouragement to keep going and work on the singing.  Summoning up even more reserves of courage, I played it to my guitar teacher (another watershed moment - actually sharing this with someone who will be critical - i.e. not a family member!), who was complementary about the singing (not so much about the guitar playing  crying).

So, all I can say is although you don't know it, you lot have helped me take a very giant step - I don't know where it will lead, but I've taken it now.

Cheers,

rockhound
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« Reply #37 on: June 22, 2009, 07:56:20 AM »

  rockhound!

I believe that the ability to hear and understand the music and the melody better is critical to singing well, and it is a skill that develops naturally over time as you learn more playing skills, almost unoticably so.

Can I suggest trying songs with a clear melody that matches the singing.  The breakthrough song for me having the confidence to sing was Norwegen Wood by the Beatles, because you play and sing the same melody line simultaneously.  I didn't think my wife was listening me sing it, and she walked in and said it sounded good.  I nearly fell off the chair.  So i recorded it and it did sound passable.  That gave me confidence to sing a bit more, and I 100% agree with Tuffy that singing tentatively quite simply does not work, and you have to commit to singing the song from start to finish or it will sound poor.

I was taught at school that tone deaf is a myth, and that everyone can learn to sing in tune.  Now I appreciate that everyone has to learn to hear in tune first.

My singing sucks, but you should have heard it 6 months ago!!! crying
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« Reply #38 on: June 22, 2009, 08:17:08 AM »

Rockhound, don't be so hard on yourself mate, we were one way or another trapped in this terrible, terrible, denial. Up untill this tread, I had that same inclination, but I decided enough is enough, and said to myself, I'm gonna do it. I'm gonna find ways to improve myself, songs that suits my voice, etc, etc. I mean, I will never get to grandstand, but hey, who cares. I always remember when I first played guitar, and that was hard because I was never a gifted guitarist or a natural guitarist, I nearly gave up. But I was told, "If you can tap to a beat, you can play a guitar" And I did, and never looked back since. Singings the same, if you can play a tune on your git, you definately can sing. You mightn't have the voice to get you to grandstand, but you sure can improve it. Remember, most of us are in the same boat, so if I can do it, you can too.
cheers
fongie
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« Reply #39 on: June 22, 2009, 11:16:26 AM »

Cheers, Ben/fongie - thanks for the encouragement/advice.  I was surprised how much my singing improved just over the course of a week of playing and singing the same song.  As you say, I'll never grandstand it, but might actually get to do it in public eventually (and maybe share something on here, which would be pretty scary).  I guess it is like most things, the more you do it the better you get.  Tuffy was spot on, you have to go for it and not be tentative - that I learned very quickly.  You are also spot on about finding songs to suit the voice (or altering the key, I guess) rather than the other way around.

Onwards and upwards, and something new to aim for!!  That's what I love about this music malarky - always challenging, but often rewarding at the same time.  Also, the nice folks on this forum 



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