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Author Topic: Crack developing  (Read 859 times)
Dihnekis
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« on: April 23, 2009, 10:55:04 PM »

Hello,

I have a D-60, and I've had it for around a year now. I just noticed what appears to be a crack developing on the top of the guitar, along one of the lines in the wood grain, all the way up the guitar to the soundhole from the strap nut thing. I keep it in its case all the time, it hasn't left my house so temperature can't really be affecting it.

What am I doing wrong? I thought the case would keep it pretty well humidified, or do I need to purchase something?

Is there anything that can be done if a crack does develop? It is just a faint line I notice only when I have some glare on the top.

Thanks for the help.
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Dale_I
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« Reply #1 on: April 23, 2009, 11:00:14 PM »

The case will only keep it humidified IF there is a humidifier in the case. I would put a damp sponge in an open baggy in the case right away and take it to a luthier pronto to have a cleat put on the underside to prevent the damage from spreading.
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Dihnekis
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« Reply #2 on: April 23, 2009, 11:06:21 PM »

Damp sponge in open baggie in the case... where? On the top of the guitar, in the soundhole?

Thanks for the help, I really appreciate the quick response.
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Dale_I
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« Reply #3 on: April 23, 2009, 11:14:13 PM »

The damp sponge would be to introduce some moisture into the case. The baggy would be so no direct contact would be made with a wet sponge. I would not put it in the soundhole, because getting it out may be a problem. You can stick it up by the tuners, or if it is a cutaway you can put it in the void that is left by the area missing. Pick up a hygrometer, which will measure the amount of humidity, and put it in the case as well. Whenever you open the case, take a quick look at the hygrometer and you'll know what conditions your guitar is experiencing.

If you have a room humidifier, you could turn it on and put your guitar in that room. You would prefer to have it around 45 to 55 percent relative humidity and the top should absorb enough moisture to expand and prevent additional damage.

For a more permanant solution, if you plan on keeping it in the case, you can purchase a travel soap container and cut a sponge to fit into the bottom of it. Put some small holes in the top of the soap container and keep it in your case with your hygrometer.
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fongie
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« Reply #4 on: April 24, 2009, 12:14:32 AM »

Sorry to hear this Dihnekis, I'm truely sorry. Was it a new guitar when you purchased it? If so maybe you can email Larrivee and see what you can do before it gets worse. I don't know to much about humidifiing guitars, because I'm from Brisbane Australia and we have alot of humidity and touch wood havn't had that problem. I'm sure the forum members can give you the utmost advise.
cheers
fongie
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Dihnekis
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« Reply #5 on: April 24, 2009, 01:06:36 AM »

I live in Florida and we have extremely high humidity here, is that a factor? I guess inside it wouldn't really matter...

Again thanks for the advice, I currently have the guitar hanging out with a sponge to see if that helps. Also, I think I may have overreacted slightly, as I haven't even been able to find the crack in any light other than across the room with strange glare hitting it. Definitely there in certain light though.
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Tycho
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« Reply #6 on: April 24, 2009, 02:58:53 AM »

Are you sure it's not just part of the wood pattern?
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« Reply #7 on: April 24, 2009, 03:11:33 AM »

Bring it to a tech to be sure.I'm also in Fla and I have a Dehumidair.Works great cost be around $300,all you got to do is clean the filter once a month and empty the tank and it tells you when to do that.I'm also saving on my AC bill.
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Dale_I
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« Reply #8 on: April 24, 2009, 03:19:31 AM »

The key here is a hygrometer. It can be just as damaging to over humidify a guitar as to under humidify it. If you have high humidity in the area that you live, you might need to get a dehumidifier and leave your guitar out of the case.
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« Reply #9 on: April 24, 2009, 01:57:10 PM »

If you live in a warm climate and run A/C all the time the humidity level inside your house could be quite low. Outdoor humidity really has no effect unless you leave your doors and windows open all the time.  The most important thing at this point is to take it to a tech, and get a accurate hygrometer to determine what the humidity level is in your home. Should be 45-50% relative humidity at 70 degrees F.

BTW, if you do a search there are many threads regarding hygrometer's.
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magictwanger
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« Reply #10 on: April 24, 2009, 09:00:04 PM »

You definitely want to check the "in case" humidity first.Regardless of the room,it is still necessary to know how varying atmospheric conditions affect the guitar,while "in it's case".You can have good normal in room humidity and still not have the best reading in the case.I think one should do this on occassion in general,to know your situation.

   I've asked Larrivee about this,and they concur that the best approach is to simply let your instrument tell you how healthy it is.They also mentioned that a case can be fairly air tight(to a degree) so an "in case" reading is a must,imo.I have continual 50% or very close readings in my room and I have built in humidifiers in my home,with additional in room systems to make sure all is OK,and  based on the time of year and outside temperatures the in case humidity will still shift,so it is not a stretch to want to have a small hygrometer "in the case" from time to time.

  The best/cheapest units I found can be obtained from Walmart for eight bucks.I tried about four different mfgrs this year and these were superb.They are called(if memory serves me) Accurite...I think....Walmart carries two different small hygrometers.One is small and white(not so hot),but the other small black unit(for 7.99) is what you want.A bargain and accurate too.

  Btw,it does sound like the crack is actually just the grain.If the finish is not seperating it is most likely grain pattern,but be safe anyway,and listen to the good folks who have come before my post.

  Good luck
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Dihnekis
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« Reply #11 on: May 10, 2009, 07:00:03 AM »

Thanks for all the help guys!
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