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Author Topic: Two ways of listening to guitar instrumentals  (Read 707 times)
lw216316
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« on: April 23, 2009, 04:38:28 PM »

Before I became a guitarist,
 when I listened to a beautiful guitar instrumental
 I might have scenic images of mountain streams
or some other appropriate imagery
completing the choreograpy in my imagination.

I would simply ENJOY the beauty of the art.

Now that I'm a guitarist  ( kind of  bigrin )
when I listen to a wonderful guitar instrumental
I find myself with other images in my mind as I experience the song.
It may be of my left hand position and movement trying to 'follow along'
or of the fretboard etc...
Or I'm wondering, "How did they do that ? "

This 'scientific listening' seems to happen automatically more and more.

Sometimes I have to remind myself to listen a second time - artistically !

Does this happen to you ?

- Larry  (raised as a scientist, growing as an artist  bigrin )



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flatlander
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« Reply #1 on: April 23, 2009, 04:56:27 PM »

It can be a curse. I have hard time tuning any kind of music out as well. So if some crap is playing I may only see someones lips moving
and hear only death metal coming out of them.
 I try on occassion to just let the music do it's thing without analyzing it. Maybe late at night when I'm too tired to think and perhaps
after a beer.
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Queequeg
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« Reply #2 on: April 23, 2009, 05:27:57 PM »

Yes, things change musically for me, too. I can be completely mesmerized by a piece of music, or as lw216316 says, "I would simply ENJOY the beauty of the art." and I need to learn it.
And once I learn it, while I am very happy to be able to play it, something is lost; part of the magic that attracted me to it in the first place.
(somewhat reminiscent of my dating career now that I analyze this neurosis of mine...)
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flatlander
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« Reply #3 on: April 23, 2009, 06:15:21 PM »

Yes, things change musically for me, too. I can be completely mesmerized by a piece of music, or as lw216316 says, "I would simply ENJOY the beauty of the art." and I need to learn it.
And once I learn it, while I am very happy to be able to play it, something is lost; part of the magic that attracted me to it in the first place.
(somewhat reminiscent of my dating career now that I analyze this neurosis of mine...)

Haw! A neurosis all men share. At least a tune can't come back and take 1/2 your money.
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RoundLakeDT
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« Reply #4 on: April 23, 2009, 06:20:53 PM »

...once I learn it, while I am very happy to be able to play it, something is lost; part of the magic that attracted me to it in the first place.

Yes I find that happens to me too; analyzing the piece enough to play it can leave you tired of it.  However, that "put off' kind of feeling goes away when I finally start forgetting the original arrangement (by somebody else, which attracted me to the piece in the first place) and however I'm playing it becomes really my own deal.  Then it becomes magic again because I'm making it new each time

Hard to put my finger on when that happens, but it's often surprising to me when I go back and listen to the original of something I've been playing for a long time:  when I first started playing the piece I'd be trying to get like the original and never be satisfied; now though, my version and the original are more or less independent (for better or worse), and I like how I'm doing it simply because that version fits with "me".  At that point I can usually enjoy the original for what it is, too

To paraphrase somebody else, I'm better off trying to play as a 100% "Dave", rather than a 1% copy of <insert famous musician here>

Dave

p.s. does all the above suggest hippie rather than barbarian?  could be a little of both.  oops wrong thread...
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lw216316
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« Reply #5 on: April 23, 2009, 06:45:59 PM »

Quote
Yes I find that happens to me too; analyzing the piece enough to play it can leave you tired of it.  However, that "put off' kind of feeling goes away when I finally start forgetting the original arrangement (by somebody else, which attracted me to the piece in the first place) and however I'm playing it becomes really my own deal.  Then it becomes magic again because I'm making it new each time
 

          

' then it becomes magic again '

very well expressed !.....
At some point for me the 'science' (all the study and practice)  get wrapped in an outside layer of ART
and I'm flyin' with the song !  bigrin

- Larry
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Larrivee OOO-60 - Lady Rose
Pavan TP-30 classical - nylon
Takamine 132s classical -nylon
former Larrivees  L-03R  SD-50
Queequeg
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« Reply #6 on: April 23, 2009, 06:58:42 PM »

Haw! A neurosis all men share. At least a tune can't come back and take 1/2 your money.

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kwakatak
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« Reply #7 on: April 26, 2009, 01:11:24 AM »

Yes I find that happens to me too; analyzing the piece enough to play it can leave you tired of it.  However, that "put off' kind of feeling goes away when I finally start forgetting the original arrangement (by somebody else, which attracted me to the piece in the first place) and however I'm playing it becomes really my own deal.  Then it becomes magic again because I'm making it new each time

Hard to put my finger on when that happens, but it's often surprising to me when I go back and listen to the original of something I've been playing for a long time:  when I first started playing the piece I'd be trying to get like the original and never be satisfied; now though, my version and the original are more or less independent (for better or worse), and I like how I'm doing it simply because that version fits with "me".  At that point I can usually enjoy the original for what it is, too

To paraphrase somebody else, I'm better off trying to play as a 100% "Dave", rather than a 1% copy of <insert famous musician here>

Dave

p.s. does all the above suggest hippie rather than barbarian?  could be a little of both.  oops wrong thread...

Wow. You hit the nail on the head with that one! I was thinking the same thing.
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