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Author Topic: Strap Pin or Not?  (Read 4341 times)
flatlander
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« Reply #60 on: March 02, 2009, 01:51:10 PM »

The alleged hole was last seen at The Albert Hall. ;) 
But finding your hole could be difficult when to mission was to see how many holes it took to fill it.
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bluesman67
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« Reply #61 on: March 02, 2009, 02:11:11 PM »

Anybody here a fan of "The Office"?  There's a few "that's what she said's" in this thread.  whistling
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« Reply #62 on: March 02, 2009, 02:55:43 PM »

This has been an interesting thread. I've hesitated to post because it seems to come down purely to preference. I don't imagine many if any of us expect this thread to change our minds or opinions. Really, does anyone care if I prefer oatmeal to cream of wheat? Or if I eat breakfast at all?

I buy guitars to play. When I play solo I prefer to sit. When I play in groups I need to stand. When I stand I prefer a strap button.

My Ovation and Takamine OM sized beater have strap buttons. My LV-10 will be getting one, my LSV-11 will not.
Bless Jim Holler's heart, I haven't decided on the FG-III. I have flip flopped. Today I think it will start without one, I won't decide until it gets here.

Thanks for listening. Hey, was there a thread somewhere on which, if any, pick guard needs to be on the FG-IIIs? Easy answer to that one, "I don't know yet either!"

Norman
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« Reply #63 on: March 02, 2009, 08:52:41 PM »

Electric guitars are made to be played standing up. Acoustic guitars are made to be played sitting down. That's why they don't have strap buttons.
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flatlander
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« Reply #64 on: March 02, 2009, 09:00:26 PM »

Acoustic guitars are made to be played sitting down. That's why they don't have strap buttons.
Almost every acoustic I see new in shops has a strap button. They're just leaving it up to you to make the choice about the second one.
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rpm60912
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« Reply #65 on: March 02, 2009, 10:14:17 PM »

Thanks for all the comments.  For the first time, I'm trying the headstock sling thing.  Used to the Taylor strap buttons at the heel.

My OM-40 nearly got one earlier this past week, but when the clerk just asked me where in the heel I wanted it;   he sounded like he did not care nor had any clue

where to put it properly.  I pointed out that apparently the Larrivee website has specific recommendations where to put it in the heel.   Clerk did not care and just

put a masking tape to mark where the pin would go.   At that point, I said, "uh.... no thanks!"   Asked for the quick release Planet Waves headstock thingy

and that's what I'm trying out.


ricky
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« Reply #66 on: March 02, 2009, 11:00:32 PM »

Electric guitars are made to be played standing up. Acoustic guitars are made to be played sitting down. That's why they don't have strap buttons.

Well, that's an interesting thought, but I would respectfully disagree. :-)

Will
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ducktrapper
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« Reply #67 on: March 02, 2009, 11:33:57 PM »

Electric guitars are made to be played standing up. Acoustic guitars are made to be played sitting down. That's why they don't have strap buttons.

If you add a     or a    we'll know you're kidding. Otherwise,  whistling
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flatlander
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« Reply #68 on: March 02, 2009, 11:37:20 PM »

But it's too late now to say you were kidding, cause then I'll feel stupid.
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Danny
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« Reply #69 on: March 02, 2009, 11:44:07 PM »

But it's too late now to say you were kidding, cause then I'll feel stupid.
                     10-1614 more than a number for 28 years. 

                                Where's your smiley dude man :-)
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« Reply #70 on: March 03, 2009, 02:22:15 AM »

I never put strap pins on my guitars!
Maybe I'll think about it.. but still then, Bob dylan never put any holes on his guitars.. and that's how I 




I was going to point out the strap that Willie Nelson uses and say he never put any holes in his guitar. But  ohmy I would have been wrong.   
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« Reply #71 on: March 03, 2009, 03:05:54 PM »

 
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« Reply #72 on: March 03, 2009, 08:26:21 PM »

Hey Ricky-  Good call for bailing out when the indifferent clerk was just going to put the pin anywhere.  As someone mentioned, Larrivee has a specific recommended location (treble side).  My Guild has a big fat beefy neck where it connects to the body and the shop put the pin dead center on that one.

I quick checked the other posts, and maybe I missed it, but another consideration is that tying around the headstock tends to pull the body of the guitar farther away from your body (pulls toward the fretting hand).  A strap pin tends to hold the guitar closer to the body (because the strap now drops almost straight down from your left shoulder- if you are a righty).  Preference will determine what is best.

I like the position when tied around the headstock, but like others, I don't like getting my hand tangled up in the strap when playing an open E, etc.

So I guess the pin just gives you move options (if it is installed properly).  I decided to get one on the FIII, hope it won't be a problem because of the 12 fret design.

Penner
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« Reply #73 on: March 03, 2009, 09:12:57 PM »

Unlike Brother Bob, I tend to play more than a few strummed cowboy chords. 
Anyway, I find that attaching a strap that way mostly works but again, am I the only one (not talking about the strap actually, physically in the way) who finds that with the strap attached to the headstock, that it interferes with your ability to (comfortably) play certain things? Like you can't get a proper grip? For example, I find I have to pull the body of the guitar to the right, nearly under my right arm and squeeze my left elbow in tight to my rib cage in order to grip a grande barred F or Bb at the first fret. This becomes a very awkward manouver at times which is why I've abandoned that method of strap attachment. I assume it's a matter of leverage rather than magic as I have no such trouble with a strap attached by the heel.
Therefore (even if I'm alone on this) I'm going to have to fail the Planet Waves system and the entire shoelace theory on purely technical grounds. Like playing a G chord with your first three fingers, it may work for some but in the end, it's an inferior method.   
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flatlander
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« Reply #74 on: March 03, 2009, 09:36:33 PM »

I think the reason to put to button on treble side is because it grabs the strap better with the angle coming around sharp.
 The button on 12 fret shouldn't be a problem, at least mine isn't, and using a strap with it makes it
fall in a more comfortable position for me. I am slowly getting more used to playing it sitting however.
 Ricky, how are you going to compare and see how much better having the strap button on neck works? (sorry). I had the same eary feeling on first one I had put on as a teen but it really is the way to go if you're going to use strap much. I still don't like watching people drill on one of my guitars anymore than I enjoy watching open heart surgery on TV. If fact I'll walk away while they drill! But I'll have a button put on as soon as I get any guitar.
 And yes Duck, there's nothing about having strap tied to neck that I like. The way it pulls, or getting in my left hands space.
 It's not a big deal to have button put on neck by anyone who can drill and use the appropriate size starter bit.
Highly recommended.
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« Reply #75 on: March 03, 2009, 09:50:20 PM »

Unlike Brother Bob, I tend to play more than a few strummed cowboy chords. 
Anyway, I find that attaching a strap that way mostly works but again, am I the only one (not talking about the strap actually, physically in the way) who finds that with the strap attached to the headstock, that it interferes with your ability to (comfortably) play certain things? Like you can't get a proper grip? For example, I find I have to pull the body of the guitar to the right, nearly under my right arm and squeeze my left elbow in tight to my rib cage in order to grip a grande barred F or Bb at the first fret. This becomes a very awkward manouver at times which is why I've abandoned that method of strap attachment. I assume it's a matter of leverage rather than magic as I have no such trouble with a strap attached by the heel.
Therefore (even if I'm alone on this) I'm going to have to fail the Planet Waves system and the entire shoelace theory on purely technical grounds. Like playing a G chord with your first three fingers, it may work for some but in the end, it's an inferior method.   

Ducktrapper
RE:  forming the G chord.  yeah, I never could figure out why some people play that chord with the first three fingers when it makes changes more difficult.  Simply going from G to G7 quickly becomes way more difficult than it needs to be.   using 2nd, 3rd and pinky to form the G makes it so much easier:  lift the pinky and hammer down the index finger on the 1st String, 1st fret and you're there.
Of course there may be advantages the other fingering that I'm not aware of.
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flatlander
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« Reply #76 on: March 03, 2009, 10:17:52 PM »

Ok best way to make a G guys. I use 3 different fingerings for G and they all serve a purpose.
I use your perfect fingering when I fingerpick usually. Mainly to get the G7 without having to interupt the thumb thing going on in the bass.
 Flat picking I usually use 4 fingers with pinky on 1st string and ring on 2nd/3rd fret. That's good for a couple reasons. Playing the D note on 2nd string sounds good to start with and gets rid of that annoying open B string. It also has my pinky and ring in position to slide up the neck and get 3rd's or slide up to 7th fret and get G chord there, with 3rd string open. Lots of stuff to do there. On the bass end it puts my strong 1st finger in position to do a strong G run if playing bluegrass or just good strong bass runs including hammer ons
of middle finger against 1st finger,  in general for any kind of music.
 The truely inferior G with 3 fingers I use for the bass string reasons just mentioned but sometimes the D on 2nd string just can't be played without clashing. 
 I makes chords with different fingerings depending on how they are going to be used, what chord is next, or before it and what fingers can be freed up to addmelody or just additional notes. Hope that opens your minds some.
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ducktrapper
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« Reply #77 on: March 03, 2009, 10:49:35 PM »

Perhaps a different thread but being able to easily play the chord both ways isn't a bad thing. The "wrong" way allows some interesting melody playing on the D string with the ring and pinky, as in Goodtime Charlie's Got the Blues or Tequila Sunrise.   
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Danny
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« Reply #78 on: March 04, 2009, 01:56:07 AM »


 am I the only one (not talking about the strap actually, physically in the way) who finds that with the strap attached to the headstock, that it interferes with your ability to (comfortably) play certain things? Like you can't get a proper grip? For example, I find I have to pull the body of the guitar to the right, nearly under my right arm and squeeze my left elbow in tight to my rib cage in order to grip a grande barred F or Bb at the first fret. This becomes a very awkward manouver at times which is why I've abandoned that method of strap attachment. I assume it's a matter of leverage rather than magic as I have no such trouble with a strap attached by the heel.
Therefore (even if I'm alone on this) I'm going to have to fail the Planet Waves system and the entire shoelace theory on purely technical grounds. Like playing a G chord with your first three fingers, it may work for some but in the end, it's an inferior method.  
                Your points are all valid on the strap interfering as you stated. I don't know if it's long arms or what but I also bump into a strap with my arm. Probably because of the way I bend my wrist.
                 And on the G chord. I wish I could play it another way. Not much strech left in my hands. Sometimes I just Barre chord a G. Or transpose a song into something I can mostly use barres for to avoid the "stretch"
                 Finger style has limbered me up some though and I will work on that G with the pinky on E.
 I do use the pinky with ring on B as flatlander stated, that is a convienent chord formation. You can pivot off the ring finger and play a D etc.
                 If I played like you and Matt do I would definitely go for the pin in the heel. I like the feel of the strap when it's on the pin right out of the back of the heel. I know most prefer the treble side.
                                                 Brother Danny, (Cowboy chording my way down the road) 
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« Reply #79 on: March 05, 2009, 06:18:33 AM »

 Matt,

I a/b my Taylor with strap pin on treble side of heel & my OM with Planet Waves quick release sling on headstock

could not honestly say I prefer one over the other. The bigger size GS made my OM more comfy to play.

Sling in headstock does not get in the way of forming any chords.

Would be interesting to a/b on same size git - strap pin versus headstock sling.

ricky
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