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Author Topic: Why do people like Macs for recording?  (Read 833 times)
hadden
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« on: February 09, 2009, 12:28:27 AM »

I see this a lot. I'm thinking about getting started myself ( don't know much at this point).

It seems some of the nicer mic pre/a/d/a convertors are only compatable with Macs, like the Metric Halo. So if I want a serious home setup I should get a Mac?


**edit: stopped being lazy and did some research. Apogee duet looks realy cool. With a mac and garagband and mics -- seems taken care of...
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jeremy3220
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« Reply #1 on: February 10, 2009, 03:10:26 AM »

What did you find? They used to say they were more stable and better suited to run those types of audio editing programs, I don't know if that's true today.
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hadden
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« Reply #2 on: February 10, 2009, 04:25:27 AM »

I haven't got into the PC vs MAC debate for these sorts of applications. I know there was a bias towards Macs from the arty crowd. What the issues were and if they are relevant now I have no idea (I'm at square one). Some of the better reviewed Pre/DA/ad converters that interest me are only compatable with the MAC, like the Apogee and Metric Halo units.  I don't know if any conclusion can be made from that.

But the Macs are bloody expensive. Still, with two MXL 603s, an apogee Duet and a Mac powerbook it doesn't add up to too bad a number. The Metric ULN-2 is supposed to be deadly good, but it's a bit up there in price for me.

What are you using?
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jeremy3220
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« Reply #3 on: February 10, 2009, 04:39:18 AM »

A custom built(by me) PC, Adobe Audition, and a M-Audio Delta 44 interface. It works well enough that I think it wouldn't make sense to upgrade unless I had a treated recording and listening room.
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hadden
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« Reply #4 on: February 10, 2009, 04:48:10 AM »

I don't have a suitable room where I am now. I'll have major noise issues -- unless I use my girlfriend's walk-in closet and soundproof the door. 
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jeremy3220
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« Reply #5 on: February 10, 2009, 04:52:05 AM »

I always set up the mics in seperate room so it doesn't pic up noise from the computer fans.
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psp
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« Reply #6 on: February 16, 2009, 12:43:09 AM »

I have been recording for about 15 years. I dont think it is such a MAc vs PC thing anymore. Its more what application would you rather work with. And also what computer do you like better. I have worked with countless audio apps for PC but have gone to a studio built around macbook pro laptop...(no fan noise) Very sleek computer too.  Im currently using logic pro 8 and garage band for the quick stuff. Also Peak pro for audio editing. Prior I was using sony sound forge for editing and cubase sx for multi track recording...I have had countless soundcards from the High priced RME to the low end sounblaster live LOL...anyways as a guitar guy mainly i have settled on the line 6 products for my ins and outs..everything is portable accept for my nearfiled monitors but I also use a pair of audio-technica headphones so I guess its all portable really.

Cheers
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Stackabones
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« Reply #7 on: February 16, 2009, 04:47:16 AM »

I switched from PC to Mac when I decided to make the move to recording on computer this last summer. I did tons of research, and when it came down to it, it seemed that the Mac was the way to go.

I've had my set-up for about eight months now. I know it's early on, but I've had ZERO problems with my computer so far. The operating system and software I use to record (Logic Pro Studio) is completely stable.

Also, you simply can't beat the price on Logic Pro Studio. It's insane.

Macs are known for their sleek design and user-friendly/intuitive interface. I can honestly say that I have more fun on my Mac than I ever had on my PC's.

I've got the 24" Imac. I use a Sapphire interface and Behringer B2030A monitors. After installing Logic (It's HUGE, so took a while), I literally just plugged everything in and got started.

Couldn't be happier with it!




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ronmac
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« Reply #8 on: February 16, 2009, 05:06:06 PM »

Either platform will work fine. Your choice of software and AD/DA converter will dictate in some cases what you can use.

I think you would be better served to spend more money on your mics and some room treatment and less on the latest version of either Mac or PC. Computers will come and go, but your signal chain and environment will be around much longer, and play a greater role in the quality of your recordings.

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Ron

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