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Author Topic: Guitar Dynamics and Design  (Read 483 times)
ark
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« on: February 08, 2009, 10:15:23 PM »

I stumbled across the article on guitar design principles at the site below and found it very interesting even though I'm not into building guitars. It is by luthier Evrin Somogyi, perhaps a well known name to those interested in luthiery, but previously unknown to me ( I'm still trying to learn how to play guitars, let alone build them).  In any case, I found the article, and the other info on his site, very informative and thought I'd pass it on. Besides, if I ever want to order a dream guitar that starts at about $25,000, I now know where to go! If you are thinking about building your own guitar, I see he has a book coming out around June 09.
Al

http://www.esomogyi.com/principles.html
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jeremy3220
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« Reply #1 on: February 08, 2009, 11:12:48 PM »

He definitely knows his stuff. Thanks for the heads up about the book.
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magictwanger
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« Reply #2 on: February 09, 2009, 04:13:35 AM »

Very nice of you to post this.

  I am going to print this out,and enjoy a longer lunch hour than usual,to "digest" it.....    It's nice being the boss.  Thanks
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Danny
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« Reply #3 on: February 09, 2009, 05:00:10 AM »

   This is my kinda guy.
                   "I am concerned that the material the saddle is made of be noncompressible, hard and stiff. I don’t use plastic because I feel it will absorb and damp some of the string vibrational energy. I’ve almost always used bone, except at one point where I was using melamine from cut-up dinner plates."

         Anybody who cuts up dinner plates to make saddles with has got to be pretty good at his craft in my book.
   (I'm eying that dog bone out back again)

    I find this interesting also. "There’s no reason you can’t have a good non-rosewood guitar. But I find that talking categorically about woods is not very useful because there can be such great variation within a species. maples are wonderful; others I’m not interested in."
                                     This is my feeling as a player, ie. Rosewood and Maple are my fav's. Hog has a tendency to vary from git to git. A lot more than RW in the same model. And my maple 00 is a special tone producer.
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Too many guitars... But I keep thinking one more may just do it.
ark
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« Reply #4 on: February 09, 2009, 05:34:21 AM »

I also read through his article on tonewoods, and was surprised that he does not reccommend that the top and back of a guitar be the same type of wood. His reasoning is each type of wood has advantages and disadvantages  ( strengths and weaknesses) tonewise, and the idea is to use different woods that complement and compensate for each other -- one wood's tonal weakness is compensated by the other wood having a strength in that same area.  Interesting .
Al
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