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Author Topic: What Was Your "Worst" or "Most Disappointing" Guitar?  (Read 5058 times)
DaveyO
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« Reply #20 on: January 11, 2009, 04:07:20 PM »

A Fender acoustic, made in china or something , Laminate I'm sure .
I didnt know anything about acoustics, it never stayed in tune and the sound was awful.,

Fender makes great electrics , but no acoustics.
But it sure looked nice.
dave
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wes
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« Reply #21 on: January 11, 2009, 04:29:27 PM »

well, my first guitar was a conqueror with truly epic action,  but as someone else said of their first, it wasn't disappointing.

it's odd perhaps,  but the only guitar that was actually disappointing to me was for years my main and favorite guitar.
a guild F212 xlnt.
i got it when i was 18 and as i played it in the shop i heard some older guys saying quietly, " he's fingerpicking it."

i paid $675 for it used in 1979.

i played it for years and even had the top off to have the braces shaved.
then i got to where the sound of it drove me crazy.
it was still beautiful but that ringing high g was like tinnitus  to me.
it lived under the bed for a couple years and i'd drag it out and play for a few minutes and just put it back in the case.
i could not stand to hear it anymore.

i believe an axe needs to be played so i sold it at the twelfth fret (shop in pdx) and the guy there told me the guy that got it was super happy with it.


you know, this makes me want to say how wonderful my larrivee is.
the sound up the neck on chords gives a shimmer that is like the twelve string in ways and i can dig in down low with the back side of my thumbnail and slap it around and it just rocks.

forgive me, but having a forum devoted to these guitars has made me effusive.

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bluesman67
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« Reply #22 on: January 11, 2009, 05:11:04 PM »

A Martin backpacker for $175.  I bought a '66 Stella parlor for $60 that is 100 times better.
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wes
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« Reply #23 on: January 11, 2009, 07:32:40 PM »

A Martin backpacker for $175.  I bought a '66 Stella parlor for $60 that is 100 times better.

i agree on both counts.

i forgot the backpacker i tried.
lame.

i got my stella for $10 bucks and that thing is the best for travel.

i regret not picking up this stella in town that had been totally gone through buy a local luthier.
it was just $150 and i had the money.
my brain was just turned off i guess.
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damianip
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« Reply #24 on: January 11, 2009, 09:07:30 PM »

I've been pretty lucky with my purchases.

I guess the most disappointing, but in no way really bad, was my Alvarez-Yairi JY-84 Jumbo. It was beautiful, beautifully made, and played like a dream.

It just didn't sound all that "Jumbo". I was looking for a bit more low-end and "growl" than I could get out of my Larrivee LV05 hog top. I guess it's a testament to the balance and range of the L series.

My brother, on the other hand, played it every time he came by to visit and eventually stopped bringing his guitars around. He would just play that whenever he was at my place.

I ended up giving it him as a present. He still loves it and plays it constantly, so the three of us (brother, guitar and I) are pretty happy.

Paolo
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flatlander
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« Reply #25 on: January 11, 2009, 09:12:38 PM »

It just hit me that the most disappointing guitar I had was my first one. A 60.00 Harmony with strings about 8 inches up. That's all parents would spend as they had gone through drill with sibblings who didn't stick with it. It was grueling to play. After that I bought my own guitars!
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« Reply #26 on: January 11, 2009, 09:58:03 PM »

I know of two dealers who do not carry Breedlove anymore. I found that out after trying to understand why something I thought would sound so good sounded like a cardboard music box.

holly

My personal opinion is that Breedloves decision to start producing the 'Atlas' Series (built overseas) was a marketing mistake. Originally Breedlove was considered a high end custom manufacturer, and even though they still produce high end guitars in their Tumolo, Oregon facility, the Atlas Series guitars have diluted the Breedlove image. As shared earlier, though I desperately wanted to love Breedloves (they are gorgeous to look at), I've yet to play one that truly impresses me!!

  ~ Ray ~
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« Reply #27 on: January 11, 2009, 10:31:11 PM »

I agree with Safricanplayer - The Breedlove Atlas,  This was going to be my first "NICE" guitar.  It was nice to look at, but just did not have any tone, and weighed a ton.  I kept trying to like the guitar, but never did, very disappointing.
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Stratokatsu
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« Reply #28 on: January 11, 2009, 10:49:39 PM »

I decided to try a nylon stringed guitar, but not wanting to spend a lot of money on it, I bought a $99 cheapie via ebay.

The brand name said "Catala" and the label inside said Made In Spain, but the wrapping paper around it in the box was in Chinese. I put good strings on it, but it wouldn't hold a tune to save its life.

I finally decided to have a contest among my guitar friends to see what it might best be used for. Suggestions ran along the line of filling it with dirt and calling it a planter... mounting a stick by the hole, hanging it from a tree and calling it a birdhouse... but the best suggestioin was to fill it with concrete and call it a sledge hammer.

I traded it in to GC versus something just so I could get rid of it.
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« Reply #29 on: January 12, 2009, 03:49:51 AM »

I`d have suggested one of these...

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psp
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« Reply #30 on: January 12, 2009, 06:36:25 AM »

Yamaha apx9-12... crying sold it for about 1/3 what i paid..ouch sounded like a flat box. But I won all the money in a casino and paid cash for it about $1200 cdn at the time. The sales rep was like "teach me how to play blackjack" LOL
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J. Hunter
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« Reply #31 on: January 14, 2009, 01:01:42 AM »

A Fender acoustic, made in china or something , Laminate I'm sure .
I didnt know anything about acoustics, it never stayed in tune and the sound was awful.,

Fender makes great electrics , but no acoustics.
But it sure looked nice.
dave

Yup.  The first guitar I bought myself was a piece of garbage, bottom of the line (I'm sure), Fender dreadnaught.  First time I walked into the ratty little music shop near my mothers work, I saw the fender hanging on the wall and thought to myself: "Cool! A Fender!  And it's shinny black!  So cool!".  I dreamed about owning it.  All I needed was the (brace yourself) $325 those crooks were charging for it (sans case). I saved up all my birthday and paper route money, and my dad even gave me his first junker (which we both learned how to play on) as a trade in to help the transaction along.  When I had the money, I went into the shop by myself (without my Father...such a mistake), handed over the cash, and went home with a shinny new (very, very shinny) Fender acoustic.  I played that thing till my fingers bleed, which took about 15 minutes as it turned out.  The action was quite high, and it had (what I was subsequently told were) heavy gage strings for some reason.  My dad decided to help me tune it (as it appeared from the noise I was making that I was having problems doing that), and about a half hour later, he decided the Fender needed new machine heads.  We were going to replace them the following weekend, and we would have if it wasn't for the fact that, during the week it became apparent that the paint on the fretboard was also causing the strings to stick, so that in between chords you heard this kind of <ptung!> noise.  Never seen anything like it since.  Just a keeper.  Anyway, I was pretty sad.  What made matters worse is that the little shop refused to take it back.  The guitar was less than a week old - and I was really cute.  Those were some cold dudes working there I'll tell ya. 

A few days after my attempted return, my father suggested I try a trade in at Long & McQuade.  I didn't have any extra money, but he thought it'd be worth a try anyway.  I went in, fell in love with a Simon and Patrick Cedar top dreadnaught ("Cool!  It has a cutaway!"), and amazingly, the very nice man working there seemed happy to take the trade in.  I asked my father if there was a difference in price, and he said "Oh, not much.  Don't you worry about that". 

Almost as impressive was my first electric.  An Epiphone Les Paul Special (or special II?).  One of those fake, solid body Epiphones in the sort of shape of a Les Paul.  I picked that one out all by myself as well ("Cool!  A Les Paul!  And it's only 150 bucks!").  I couldn't get it in tune, but I was told by a knowledgeable schoolyard friend that all I needed to do was get a set up.  Those bridges needed to be set up correctly.  My knowledgeable friend was actually right, and the guitar tuned beautifully after the set up, and stayed in tune (provided you didn't get crazy and bend any strings or anything like that) for literally 20 minutes or so.  No attempted returns this time.  It sat in my room collecting dust for 15 years or so.  Probably had 10 hrs. of play on it (mmm, less).  Turned me off of electric guitar all together (mostly unconsciously, I think).  I played nothing but acoustic until about a year or so ago when a good friend, who had been puzzled for years by the fact that I never played electric, bought me a telecaster on the condition that I play with him.  Good deal that.  The telecaster is fantastic, and I've missed so much. 

I recently sold that epiphone on craigslist (to someone who just wanted the neck and body) for the same price I paid for it!  That turned the second most disappointing guitar I've owned into the second most pleasantly surprising one (next to the tele). 



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wes
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« Reply #32 on: January 14, 2009, 01:16:10 AM »

your dad= very cool.
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J. Hunter
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« Reply #33 on: January 14, 2009, 01:27:53 AM »

your dad= very cool.

Yes indeed.
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« Reply #34 on: January 14, 2009, 07:53:46 PM »

The biggest disappointments I've had were not really related with the price/quality of the instrument (I've had and have cheap instruments I like a lot), but were with quality instruments not meeting my expectations.

After years of playing a cheap Sigma, I bought my first good guitar, a Taylor 414.  Not long after, I started going to bluegrass jams and decided I ought to have a dreadnought too, so spend a lot of time on ebay looking for good values.  I bought an early 2000s Guild D-25 for ~$400, which was a lovely looking and feeling guitar, but just sounded flat, dead, and quiet.  I kept it for a year or so then sold it to a starving musician who was happy to get it.

I've always loved and wanted a sunburst dreadnought guitar.  I already had a good, natural-finish Martin D1 I used a lot, but I found a used D1 on ebay that someone had ordered with sunburst, and then tried to polish the finish to gloss with uneven results.  I really wanted to love that guitar and move it into the starting lineup, but from the very first notes I realized I my natura-finishl D1 sounded quite a bit better.  After awhile I sold the sunburst at a loss.  Recently, after using an OM-04 as my favorite for awhile, I bought a nice OM-03R here.  Again, I expected and wanted to love that guitar and maybe replace my OM-04, but I soon realized that my ears preferred the mahogany sound.  I put the OM-03R back up for sale before the holidays to help with expenses, which was disappointing, but the new owner really fell in love with it so it worked out for the good.

Another disappointment, or frustration is finding issues developing with quality instruments that you would like to think should go for years and years without any problems.  For ex, I have two mid-late 90s Taylor guitars; on both of them, a number of the fret ends have noticeably lifted (or were never set properly into the slots to begin with).  But I am not that proactive in getting things taken care of; rather than take them in to get fixed, as if to punish the guitars I put them away and play other instruments.  There can be a tendency to get really finicky and fixated on  every tiny issue or setup inconsistency, when you can just pick it up and play!
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« Reply #35 on: January 14, 2009, 08:19:12 PM »

I ordered a brass bodied square neck reso from a guy on ebay (pm me if curious)

Turned out to be an import wood laminate (by itself not such a big deal in a reso) but with the with brass sheeting glued on.

It was OK, worked OK, the stuff added was done well, but the glued-on thing just never sat well with me.
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pennerblue
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« Reply #36 on: January 15, 2009, 06:21:18 AM »


Almost as impressive was my first electric.  An Epiphone Les Paul Special (or special II?).  One of those fake, solid body Epiphones in the sort of shape of a Les Paul. 


I think this is almost a mandatory rite of passage...I did the same thing.  Hated that bugger!
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« Reply #37 on: January 15, 2009, 11:34:34 AM »

My first guitar was the worst, an ultra cheap (I think around $29 Canadian new in about 1966) electric guitar called a Zenon, with strings about half an inch off the fretboard. It was soon replaced by a Harmony archtop with a floating pickup (better) and then a Gretsch Corvette  .

The most disappointing was a Fender Precision bass I about in about 1975. Only after I bought it did I realize some amateur had shaved the neck, badly  crying. It wouldn't stay in tune, it would bend with the slightest change in humidity, and it had several dead spots on the low E string.
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« Reply #38 on: January 15, 2009, 12:43:47 PM »

A Fender acoustic, made in china or something , Laminate I'm sure .
I didnt know anything about acoustics, it never stayed in tune and the sound was awful.,

Fender makes great electrics , but no acoustics.
But it sure looked nice.
dave

I started with a fender acoustic, and it was all I had until last year when I got my first Larry.  Pulled it out the other day and gave it some TLC, new strings, clean up etc.  It plays real nice with very light strings on it, although the sound is pretty thin and weak for a dread, but it is seriously very comfortable and easy to play.  Intonation is OK.  The nec is pretty narrow, which is a bother to me, but hopefully a good thing for my kids to learn on.  A frined found an almost identical guitar in their fathers loft recently though, and it was an absolute dog to play.  I tidied it up for them, but it was awful compared to mine.  Guess I got lucky.

When I get around to putting GO|TOHs on my OM-03, the pings will go on the Fender (it has two damaged tuners), and it should do the kids for many years.
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« Reply #39 on: January 18, 2009, 01:51:08 PM »

My worse guitar was a Takamine 340s cutaway dreadnought. When I bought it I tried to change the strings and the neck took a very weird angle (I don't know how to describe it in English) so that it impossible to play it since the strings buzzed. I took to the shop for reset. When I tried to adjust the neck myself, the truss rod stuck with just a very small turn of the allen key. For ever! Nightmare. That happened 20 years ago. I hope they make them better now.
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