Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: J-35 makeover II  (Read 1458 times)
Zohn
Gold Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2463




Ignore
« on: December 31, 2008, 08:29:39 AM »

After

[attachment deleted by admin]
Logged

"To me...music exists to elevate us as far as possible above everyday life." ~ Gabriel Faure
jwb
Senior Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 696




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: December 31, 2008, 01:15:45 PM »

That really looks great!

My question is:  How does it sound?  Was a an Adirondack top put on it?  The bracing is also significantly different from the original, in the a more modern configuration and scalloped...is the sound improved?  It looks like it was playable in the original condition, although barely, but I would guess it was enough to know how the sound changed.  That's great work giving a very cool instrument new life!

Justin
Logged

OM-03 MT Custom (Cree Studios "Fish Guitar")
BenF
Gold Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3256




Ignore
« Reply #2 on: December 31, 2008, 01:24:40 PM »

Can I ask a question about this.  I see that the fretboard was cut at the 14th fret, to allow the top to be removed and replaced.  How is the remainder of the fretboard replaced afterwards, given that some of it will have been lost through cutting (sawdust)?  Given that the distance between frets has to be so precise, how can this me recreated.  Also, does it mean that the action is more difficult to set, given that the fretboard is no longer a single piece, or can it really be reset that accurately? 

I am just interested.  So much efort goes into creating the individual parts of a guitar, it seems to be a major complication to then cut one of those elements in half and try to fix it again.  Is it more effort than it is worth to remove the entire fretboard instead (I see this done on stories about electric guitar repairs quite frequently)?
Logged

Ben
2009 FIII LS-03RHB #5

http://www.youtube.com/user/1978BenF
Zohn
Gold Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2463




Ignore
« Reply #3 on: December 31, 2008, 01:33:46 PM »

Can I ask a question about this.  I see that the fretboard was cut at the 14th fret, to allow the top to be removed and replaced.  How is the remainder of the fretboard replaced afterwards, given that some of it will have been lost through cutting (sawdust)?  Given that the distance between frets has to be so precise, how can this me recreated.  Also, does it mean that the action is more difficult to set, given that the fretboard is no longer a single piece, or can it really be reset that accurately? 
+1 Very sharp observation Ben, I asked him the same question - he replaced the fretboard with a fresh slab of Indian Rosewood. He specifically didn't want to remove the neck since he deemed it to be too risky. 
Logged

"To me...music exists to elevate us as far as possible above everyday life." ~ Gabriel Faure
BenF
Gold Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3256




Ignore
« Reply #4 on: December 31, 2008, 01:49:06 PM »

Thanks Zohn.  It certainly looks good now.  I suppose using a new section of fretboard would make creating the new top easier, rather than having to fit it to the old fretbaord.  Guitar repair strikes me as more difficult to do well than guitar making from scratch.
Logged

Ben
2009 FIII LS-03RHB #5

http://www.youtube.com/user/1978BenF
Zohn
Gold Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2463




Ignore
« Reply #5 on: December 31, 2008, 02:33:53 PM »

Thanks Zohn.  It certainly looks good now.  I suppose using a new section of fretboard would make creating the new top easier, rather than having to fit it to the old fretbaord.  Guitar repair strikes me as more difficult to do well than guitar making from scratch.
That's exactly what Hans said - easier to build new from scratch. He had a major battle removing the finish.
Logged

"To me...music exists to elevate us as far as possible above everyday life." ~ Gabriel Faure
pigtown
Senior Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 403




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: January 01, 2009, 02:28:57 PM »

Awesome job.  Must be a pleasure to play.  Very easy on the eye.
Logged
Zohn
Gold Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2463




Ignore
« Reply #7 on: January 04, 2009, 02:18:00 PM »

Awesome job.  Must be a pleasure to play.  Very easy on the eye.
She sounds somewhat stifled because of the new top, but kinda like a slope-shouldered-18-series Martin.   
Logged

"To me...music exists to elevate us as far as possible above everyday life." ~ Gabriel Faure
rate800
Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 74


WWW

Ignore
« Reply #8 on: January 04, 2009, 07:57:45 PM »

Man, that is a pretty guitar.  I like the new top.  The bracing looks right on to me.
Logged

Ray L Teel


LS-03R #4 forum III
Martin D-35
Martin D-28 Marquis
magictwanger
Senior Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 544




Ignore
« Reply #9 on: January 04, 2009, 09:50:06 PM »

Hey Zohn,that is a real beauty!!...Is it yours?
Logged
Zohn
Gold Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2463




Ignore
« Reply #10 on: January 05, 2009, 05:50:53 AM »

Hey Zohn,that is a real beauty!!...Is it yours?
High Mark! no, my Luthier-buddy (Hans) did it for one of his Day-job-colleagues. I held and played it though. a Very good job done by Hans.
If I ever could, I would love a Santa Cruz Vintage Jumbo, which is based on the Gibson Advanced Jumbo. It is differentiated from the J-35/J-45/J-50 by its long scale-length.
 
Logged

"To me...music exists to elevate us as far as possible above everyday life." ~ Gabriel Faure
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to: