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Author Topic: Ovation: Hate Em or Love Em?  (Read 6524 times)
rrgguitarman
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« Reply #40 on: November 14, 2008, 08:17:28 PM »

Love or hate 'em they do have their own unique sound. It isn't bad or good but it is easily identifiable on recordings and the 12's are almost symphonic with their presence.

Exactly!

Ovations do have their own unique sound for sure.
I happen to own at the present time a 1771LX that I think sounds real good...now, it does not compare to my L-03WL or to my Taylor GS4 Blackwood and it sure doesn't sound like my trusty Seagull S6+ Spruce...but, I don't want to!
This is my 4 Ovation over the last 40 years of playing guitar and by far my favorite.
I like deep bowl sound but, it is hard to keep on your lap  and that is why I bought the mid bowl 1771LX well, it still moves around if I don't put a strap on but, that is not a big deal now that I've learned that all I needed to do was add another strap button on the side of the neck and the darn thing stays put whether I'm sitting or standing.

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The foreign made O's are just not gonna win anybody who likes fine guitars.  The LX's, on the other hand, are one of the best values in guitars on the planet.  They sound great plugged and unplugged and are as playable as anything I've ever held in my hands (and I've held a lot).  The Adamii are cannons.  the OP-Pro and VIP preamps used in the higher end American models are also top-notch - the VIP especially is a very versatile preamp with a wide tonal range.

Very true.

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es-335
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« Reply #41 on: November 15, 2008, 04:42:55 PM »

if he likes it

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xuv0kiuDJM8

i like it..
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Jeffrey

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« Reply #42 on: November 15, 2008, 10:55:31 PM »

I have a Balladeer 1111-4 I bought new in 1972 for $170 or so at DiFiori's music in Cleveland. I played it for about a year and moved on to other things. It sat in a closet at my parent's home for more than 20 years until my father died and my mother sold the place. Then it sat in a closet at my home until about four years ago when I took up the guitar again. I have more money now than I did in 1972 (and more money than sense and guitar skills), so I now have three all-wood acoustics and the Ovation is back in the closet. The all-wood guitars just sound a lot better, and I prefer small bodies.

But, the Ovation has proved very durable; it has no top cracks or checking and is now a wonderful pumpkin shade. Apart from a couple of small dings, it looks like new. It stays in tune forever. The neck feels better and plays faster than those of my more expensive guitars. And it doesn't sound bad, really.

Ovations have a following here in Japan where I now live, and if I bothered to list mine on an auction site it would probably fetch $300-400. But, my daughter recently married and is moving to another part of Japan. So, my trusty Balladeer will make its way to yet another closet at her place to come out when I visit. It will be available as a starter guitar for any musically inclined grandchildren that come along. I suspect they will find it with the top intact, the color further improved, and the tuners working perfectly.

Just one regret. I also bought a Les Paul Custom in 1972. I sold that to fund my first trip to Japan and kept the Ovation. I wish I had sold the Ovation, kept the Les Paul, and found another way to raise the money. Oh, well. Now I have a Telecaster.

BDM
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Zohn
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« Reply #43 on: December 02, 2008, 09:51:27 AM »

I've heard very mixed opinions about Ovations. I personally own one but am looking to get a Larrivee to replace it. How does everyone feel about the roundback guitar maker?

I first heard of them when I saw Paul Simon using one on the "concert in Central Park" recording. In those days (was it the late 70's?) everyone seemed to use them - from Al Di Meola to Neil Diamond, and the famous Adamas used by Glen Campbell. At home that was the guitar to have - their plugged-in qualities were very sought after - nowadays  Takamine seems to be the plugged-in brand of choice. I bought a used Korean Celebrity (shallow bowl), and oh my!!!- was I the cat's whiskers or what???? That was my first Electro-Acoustic, and I have fond memories of some praise and worship events I used it for. At some point, someone knocked it off its stand on stage, and the neck-joint separated. I had it fixed, but it was never the same. I guess that was the point which broke my affection for them, and in retrospect, I can't believe I actually liked the distinct Ovation sound. (Predictably metallic) It seems strange, but I have subsequently never touched one, and never had the desire to.  blush
 
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"To me...music exists to elevate us as far as possible above everyday life." ~ Gabriel Faure
teh
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« Reply #44 on: December 02, 2008, 10:10:14 AM »

When I was a kid growing up in a conservative small town neighborhood right out of Leave it to Beaver, the guy up the street painted his house pink and every year around this time, he put one of those big aluminum Christmas trees in front of his full sized picture window with one of those rotating four color lights. Many of the kids in the neighborhood thought it was cool but many others did not share their view.

Ovation is one of those companies that pushed the envelope on design and paved the way for innovative thinking. I had one for about 15 years that is the only guitar I ever sold. I had no regrets buying it and got $50 more than I paid for it.
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TEH

Larrivee Parlor Flamed Maple
Larrivee LV-03 12 string w/ Mahogany Top 
Martin D-35 Shade Top
Martin OM-35 Sunburst
Martin 000-18 custom w/3 piece mahogany back, 12 fret slotted headstock
Martin Backpacker w/Nashville tuning
Oahu Square Neck
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