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Author Topic: "Sitting On Top Of The World"  (Read 726 times)
Will Fly
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« on: November 09, 2008, 05:50:49 PM »

Here's a very loose version of that old blues "Sitting On Top Of The World". Recorded using both Sony Minidisc recorder (acoustically) and through a Roland 8-track - mixed down to get the required tone. I first heard this tune from the playing of Sonny Terry & Brownie McGhee, and then from the playing of Doc Watson. My version is based very loosely on Doc's.

Here's the YouTube compression:

Sitting On Top The World (YouTube)

And here's the high-quality Vimeo compression:

Sitting On Top Of The World (Vimeo)

Cheers,

Will

PS: You might be interested in a mandolin/guitar duet. The mandolin was made by a friend of mine and is on permanent loan to me. The backing gitar is the OM... The Marquis Of Lorne

I've been a busy bee this Sunday!
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jeremy3220
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« Reply #1 on: November 09, 2008, 06:25:07 PM »

That was great  I give it five stars. I love that fluid style of fingerpicking used on traditional type tunes. Most of the versions I've heard use a shuffle type rhythm. I did hear the warm Doc Watson influenced tone; kinda reminded me of his version of 'Blue Railroad Train'.
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sayheyjeff
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« Reply #2 on: November 11, 2008, 02:28:31 AM »

Will

that is great playing!  had to go through everything you put up!  what a pleasure.  very cool to hear your rendition of cuckoo's nest.  its one of the recent songs given to me in my lessons.  had never heard it before the assignment and I have been enjoying it.  I play the little version in the flatpicker;s fake book and of course, pick it.  love your version of blue monk too.  one of my favorite songs ever since I saw monk play it back in school days.  thanks for sharing.  will visit your recordings to hear what your playing often.

jeff
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« Reply #3 on: November 11, 2008, 08:32:46 AM »

Lovin' The Marquis Of Lorne Will 
Not a mandoline player myself, I was wondering why you only seem to use downward strokes with the plectrum ?
I'm inclined to think up-and-down movements could make the solo move a little smoother, but of course I may be totally wrong here.
Probably has to do with not missing the octave strings ?
Good playing overall - keep it up.
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Will Fly
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« Reply #4 on: November 11, 2008, 09:32:30 AM »

Lovin' The Marquis Of Lorne Will 
Not a mandoline player myself, I was wondering why you only seem to use downward strokes with the plectrum ?
I'm inclined to think up-and-down movements could make the solo move a little smoother, but of course I may be totally wrong here.
Probably has to do with not missing the octave strings ?
Good playing overall - keep it up.

An easy question to answer - I'm a very occasional mandolin player! I pick it up from time to time and do what I can. The fingering's easy because I've played tenor banjo (which is a 5th down from the mandolin, i.e. viola tuning) for many years. However, whereas I can play with up and down strokes quite easily on the tenor banjo, I find the narrowness of the mandolin neck a little fiddly and - as you say - it's easier to get an even tone in those circumstances by doing constant up strokes. Mind you, if you look closely, you'll see some up-and-down work in the second theme... must have lost my head!

Cheers,

Will
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flatlander
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« Reply #5 on: November 11, 2008, 11:05:11 AM »

An easy question to answer - I'm a very occasional mandolin player! I pick it up from time to time and do what I can. The fingering's easy because I've played tenor banjo (which is a 5th down from the mandolin, i.e. viola tuning) for many years. However, whereas I can play with up and down strokes quite easily on the tenor banjo, I find the narrowness of the mandolin neck a little fiddly and - as you say - it's easier to get an even tone in those circumstances by doing constant up strokes. Mind you, if you look closely, you'll see some up-and-down work in the second theme... must have lost my head!

Cheers,

Will
No, you're just a natural misplaced oldtime  bluegrasser Will!  Bill Monroe even on fast stuff was big into downstrokes only, or as much as possible anyway. He was a powerful man all the way around and I think he went for the power of the downstroke.
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