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Author Topic: What was the most influential rock album  (Read 7264 times)
pennerblue
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« Reply #20 on: September 26, 2008, 08:47:02 PM »

I'll make a plug for the Stones' Let it Bleed.  They also did the psychedelic thing in 1967 with TWO albums (Flowers and Their Satanic Majesty's Request).  Then in a dramatic and gutsy move, released Let it Bleed the next year.  At a hugely influential time they went back to basics (blues), went country, and also rocked their socks off.  That's my vote, and something to toss in the ring of discussion.

For me, the next leap would be Clash's London Calling.  Punk meets reggae, opening lots of doors down the road. Clash fans might say Sandanista because of how they thumbed their noses at the music industry by releasing a THREE album set (including backing vocals by british choir boys--but then again Pink Floyd's The Wall came out just before it).  Speaking of The Wall, that's got to get some consideration as well...

The next leap would be Wilco's Yankee Hotel Foxtrot.  If you don't know the story, it's a good one.  They lock themselves away in the studio and make the album.  The label doesn't like it and wants them to change it.  They won't.  They get dropped. They release it unoffically for free through their website.  Another label picks it up and it sells like hotcakes.  Very cool album,  quite influential on today's music and that to come.

Back to the 60's, some would say Velvet Underground and Nico as well.

And of course, Sgt. Peppers.
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« Reply #21 on: September 27, 2008, 12:40:36 AM »

Was that the same Gloria done by Van and Them?

Surely you mean Gloria done by Patti Smith?
 

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« Reply #22 on: September 27, 2008, 01:07:47 AM »

The Who: Who's Next.  It's got crescendos, acoustic and electric guitars, suspense, drive, excellent compositions that are executed so well.  It's folky, rocky and singer-songwritery.  ( and it doesn't have contrived pseudo adjectives in the lyrics )

          DAVE
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« Reply #23 on: September 27, 2008, 01:52:08 AM »

My vote goes to "Meet the Beatles"
                           #1 would have to be the Moody Blues album with the song "Have you heard" I think that was "Threshold of a dream" #2 would be "Tommy" by Roger and Pete of course.   "WHO?"
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Too many guitars... But I keep thinking one more may just do it.
pennerblue
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« Reply #24 on: September 27, 2008, 09:34:25 AM »

The Who: Who's Next.  It's got crescendos, acoustic and electric guitars, suspense, drive, excellent compositions that are executed so well.  It's folky, rocky and singer-songwritery.  ( and it doesn't have contrived pseudo adjectives in the lyrics )

          DAVE

And don't forget that album cover!!!
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« Reply #25 on: September 27, 2008, 04:10:23 PM »

The Who: Who's Next.  It's got crescendos, acoustic and electric guitars, suspense, drive, excellent compositions that are executed so well.  It's folky, rocky and singer-songwritery.  ( and it doesn't have contrived pseudo adjectives in the lyrics )

          DAVE

Their best overall album and one that I can still listen to over and over again.


And don't forget that album cover!!!

Tell me about it!  Took me a while to figure out what they had done.
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pennerblue
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« Reply #26 on: September 28, 2008, 05:16:00 AM »

Question:  What the heck were they peeing on?  And where is it?

Is it now a Who mecca where Who fanatics congegrate on Pete Townsend's birthday?

Love the Who...and really love Keith Moon.  His antics and unique style must rank him among the most influential CHARACTERS in rock music!
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Three Larries and a Guild and an A&L...and electrics...and a mando

“Your lack of technique can be part of your style. The thing about style is that it’s more entertaining, more important and hopefully more intellectual than technique.”
Kim Thayil (Soundgarden)

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« Reply #27 on: September 28, 2008, 06:10:11 AM »

Most influential rock album really does have to go to Sgt. Pepper ....
but thanks to this wonderful digital age, I have burned my OWN Sgt. Pepper album. If it had been released like this originally in '67, would have been the greatest collection of songs ever...
(Strongly recommend you try it - burn these songs in this order, put headphones on, turn out the lights, and fly..)

Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band
With a Little Help From My Friends
Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds
The Fool on the Hill
I Am the Walrus
Getting Better
Fixing a Hole
She's Leaving Home
Strawberry Fields Forever
For The Benefit of Mr. Kite
Magical Mystery Tour
Within You Without You
All You Need Is Love
Penny Lane
When I'm Sixty Four
Hello Goodbye
Lovely Rita
Good Morning Good Morning
Sgt. Pepper (reprise)
A Day in the Life

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Walkerman
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« Reply #28 on: September 28, 2008, 02:21:13 PM »

".....I'll make a plug for the Stones' Let it Bleed.  They also did the psychedelic thing in 1967 with TWO albums (Flowers and Their Satanic Majesty's Request).  Then in a dramatic and gutsy move, released Let it Bleed the next year.  At a hugely influential time they went back to basics (blues), went country, and also rocked their socks off.  That's my vote, and something to toss in the ring of discussion....."

Actually, the next album they released was Beggar's Banquet, which was followed up by Let it Bleed a year later.

I will say that Beggar's Banquet, Let it Bleed and Sticky Fingers has to be one of the best "one, two, three punches"
ever released.
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Stephen Basil
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« Reply #29 on: September 28, 2008, 02:36:01 PM »

"I will say that Beggar's Banquet, Let it Bleed and Sticky Fingers has to be one of the best "one, two, three punches"
ever released." . .  and then "Exile on Main Street."  Grand Slam!!

Then M. Jagger corporatized the band and it's been thirty five plus years of lucrative crappola ever since!... apart from a few tunes.
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« Reply #30 on: September 28, 2008, 03:04:54 PM »

"I will say that Beggar's Banquet, Let it Bleed and Sticky Fingers has to be one of the best "one, two, three punches"
ever released." . .  and then "Exile on Main Street."  Grand Slam!!

Then M. Jagger corporatized the band and it's been thirty five plus years of lucrative crappola ever since!... apart from a few tunes.

I couldn't agree more.  I wonder how much losing Mick Taylor had to do with that.  OTOH...Some Girls was pretty good....
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« Reply #31 on: September 28, 2008, 03:57:39 PM »

I recall reading that M. Taylor left because of the shift in musical direction towards more pop-oriented, standardized arrangements.  Also, that K. Richard's battle with drug addiction in the seventies was in no small part worsened by the shift away from the complex, collaborative R&B sound they really perfected between '68 and '72.

Jagger did say that if he wouldn't be a rock'n roller after thirty and he kinda followed through on that, turning the Rolling Stones into something of an image and branding enterprise along the lines of A. Warhol's model.  The music has definitely been secondary ever since.  Some Girls and Live at the El Mocombo may have been a concession to Richard, but then that horror Emotional Rescue  came out!!
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Walkerman
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« Reply #32 on: September 28, 2008, 04:47:29 PM »

I recall reading that M. Taylor left because of the shift in musical direction towards more pop-oriented, standardized arrangements.  Also, that K. Richard's battle with drug addiction in the seventies was in no small part worsened by the shift away from the complex, collaborative R&B sound they really perfected between '68 and '72.

Jagger did say that if he wouldn't be a rock'n roller after thirty and he kinda followed through on that, turning the Rolling Stones into something of an image and branding enterprise along the lines of A. Warhol's model.  The music has definitely been secondary ever since.  Some Girls and Live at the El Mocombo may have been a concession to Richard, but then that horror Emotional Rescue  came out!!

Rumors at the time were that Jagger was jealous of the attention Taylor and his wife were getting.  I have a DVD "Ladies and Gentlemen, the Rolling Stones"  I thijnk that Taylor came off as the star in it, much as Robbie did in Last Waltz.
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« Reply #33 on: September 28, 2008, 07:46:39 PM »

Was that the same Gloria done by Van and Them?

No - not the same song.

And oh, I got the song AND album wrong.

It was actually the song 'I Will Follow'
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g2BqLlVHlWA

Not on October, but on 'Boy' their first album.  I quickly obtained everything they had done when I found myself playing along with 'I Will Follow' - so forgive me for getting the album and song wrong.

Needless to say, October was influential on me in a different way.  It had spiritual themes - from a Christian who didn't act like he had all the answers.  Up to that point in time all the Christian music I had heard were these nice packaged 'Jesus Changed Me - no problems' kind of messages that didn't resonate with the struggles I was going through as a Christian.

Lots of people look down their nose at Bono from U2 because he gets involved heavily in social causes and can be quite 'preachy'.  I say, more of it.

-Scott



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pennerblue
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« Reply #34 on: September 29, 2008, 01:38:17 AM »


Actually, the next album they released was Beggar's Banquet, which was followed up by Let it Bleed a year later.

I will say that Beggar's Banquet, Let it Bleed and Sticky Fingers has to be one of the best "one, two, three punches"
ever released.

Thanks for the correction Walkerman.  Oops, I got them mixed up a bit.  I absolutely agree on the one, two, three.

I gave Beggar's Banquet to a college student last year to listen to and he was blown away.  Unfortunately a huge percentage of 20-somethings have only heard about a dozen Stones songs.  I guess even worse, they've probably only heard about four Who songs.  Maybe "The Kids are Alright" should be mandatory viewing for college freshmen.

Penner
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“Your lack of technique can be part of your style. The thing about style is that it’s more entertaining, more important and hopefully more intellectual than technique.”
Kim Thayil (Soundgarden)

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« Reply #35 on: October 03, 2008, 07:03:11 AM »

Interesting thread.  Television's Marquee Moon (1977) has been hugely influential - listen to any current "indie" rock act, for example, to hear the references.

As for what has influenced me the most personally - that's a tough one!  A few, without giving it a huge amount of thought:

Blood on the Tracks (Dylan)
Absolutely Live (Doors)
II (Led Zeppelin)
Wish You Were Here (Pink Floyd)
Damnation (Opeth)

But there are many more!
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« Reply #36 on: October 03, 2008, 07:38:28 PM »

Robert Johnson's recordings. He invented the sound of sixties rock & roll. I'm not just saying that out of historical respect or anything, when I listen to RJ it just sounds soaked in rock & roll.
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« Reply #37 on: October 03, 2008, 07:47:30 PM »

The Beatles were very special, but I'd have to say the most influential rock album to me was Santana - "Abraxas".

It's been forty years and when I listen to "Samba Pa Ti", I still get THAT feeling of a player who LOVES his instrument ... they both seem to SING !!!     
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« Reply #38 on: October 04, 2008, 12:52:46 AM »

I agree with you Canoe.  Early Santana blew me away and still does.  I especially liked Caravansarai.

          DAVE
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« Reply #39 on: October 18, 2008, 07:51:25 AM »

I agree with the notion that Beggar's Banquet, Let it Bleed and Sticky Fingers are the the three great stones albums. 

Some book I was reading had Keith saying that Mick Taylor would only play lead and that forced Keith into pure rhythm.  He would rather play the more free flowing style of trading licks like he does with Ron.  That and the recording of Exile really let M. T. know what he was in for being a Stone.

Chad

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