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dwortman
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« on: July 24, 2008, 04:15:53 PM »

Multitrack or computer based? I'm talking more home based studio and I would like to hear your experiences and opinions. There is so much expertise on this forum and I would be foolish to not take advantage of it. Thanks
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rockstar_not
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« Reply #1 on: July 24, 2008, 04:38:16 PM »

You are going to get advice all over the map.

One big question - do you plan to add MIDI instrumentation of any kind?  That is, it's pretty much a given you are going to record guitar tracks, but what about other stuff - backing drums, keyboards, etc.?  If you want these, will you record live musicians (including yourself) or will you do midi recording where you will possibly edit the midi data before commiting it to audio?

If you will do anything with MIDI, then the choice is computer-based only - the multi-track hardware devices really aren't designed for convenient and easy MIDI editing.

If you don't use MIDI, then it comes down to some other questions:

Do you like using computers?  Yes - consider computer based DAW, no - then definitely the multi-track is high on the list.

From there the questions blossom into a multitude of different options - but at least get this far down the decision tree.

-Scott

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H.S.J.M
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« Reply #2 on: July 24, 2008, 07:33:10 PM »

i have a fostex m-r8 8 track digital recorder that sound great for the money.(300 bucks)  if you get one buy a mic to go with it though.
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sdelsolray
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« Reply #3 on: July 27, 2008, 01:29:39 AM »

Multitrack or computer based? I'm talking more home based studio and I would like to hear your experiences and opinions. There is so much expertise on this forum and I would be foolish to not take advantage of it. Thanks

Plan the studio (features, requirements and architecture), set your overall budget (low, medium, high), identify gear/tools to meet the plan and budget (this is the fun part), purchase and build the studio (fun also) and spend a significant amount of time to understand and learn how to utilize the monster you have created (also enjoyable).

You can build a home studio for $1,000 or $100,000, or anywhere in between.  The first step is the most important.  You will iterate during the features/requirements/architecture phase.  Research, ask questions of yourself and others and learn.

It's a fascinating endeavor, whether you are involved professional or simply as a hobby.
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dwortman
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« Reply #4 on: July 27, 2008, 10:36:42 PM »

Thanks for your responses. I knew I would get some valuable insights. I agree that a lot of planning and research should happen before actually taking the plunge. Here are some more questions. Where do you invest the majority of your funds? Do you go for the best mic's you can afford? Or, do you go for the electronics knowing you can upgrade your mic's later? Your right sdelsolroy, this is fun. 

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sdelsolray
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« Reply #5 on: July 28, 2008, 05:01:38 AM »

Thanks for your responses. I knew I would get some valuable insights. I agree that a lot of planning and research should happen before actually taking the plunge. Here are some more questions. Where do you invest the majority of your funds? Do you go for the best mic's you can afford? Or, do you go for the electronics knowing you can upgrade your mic's later? Your right sdelsolroy, this is fun. 

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One well respected theory states that you should spread your budget more or less equally among six areas, with additional static funds for two other areas.

The six "shared" areas are:

1)  Microphones
2)  Preamps
3)  Converters and computer interface
4)  Monitoring chain
5)  Software
6)  Room

The two "static" areas are:

1)  Computer
2)  Miscellaneous (cables, mic stands, educational materials, workstation, etc.).

So, for example, if you budget $6,000 for the shared areas, you should spend $1,000 each, more or less, on each of the six areas.  That will build a balanced system with no weak links, at that budget point.  The cost of the computer and miscellaneous categories will not change much regardless of the budget for the other 6 groups.

The above is not a set of rules at all.  Many folks spend less on the converter/interface and software components and spend more on mics preamps on monitoring chain.  But don't scrimp on the room.

When it comes to architecture, here's a few of the many questions that you need to answer:

1)  What instruments will you be recording?
2)  What is the maximum number of sources that you will be recording at the same time?
3)  Will you need expansion capabilities?
4)  What do you want to do with the recorded music?
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