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brandon
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« on: March 09, 2008, 06:24:53 PM »

i have a D-60 that i'm interested in modifying to gain a little bit more boom out of. I have bone pins and a bone saddle. what other modifications would you suggest to achieve more sound from this guitar?

oh btw, i use d'addario EJ19 phosphor bronze bluegrass gauge strings
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brandon

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« Reply #1 on: March 09, 2008, 06:58:54 PM »

Maybe move up to a full EJ17 set of mediums.  Other than that, all of the things I can think of are pretty invasive.  With that said, you could look for a luthier who is qualified to scallop the braces, both top and back, remove the "popsicle brace", get the bridge ramped and swap out the large RW bridgeplate for a smaller maple one.   All of this would most likely void your warranty and could possibly cause your guitar to implode at some later date, or not.  Alternatively, a pick up and amp would do the trick.  And lastly, this may be a case where you are better off selling and finding something that serves your purposes more than the D-60 is now.
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blued03r
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« Reply #2 on: March 09, 2008, 10:26:28 PM »

Never thought I'd hear of anyone needing more boom from a D-60.    
Here's my suggestion:      nice guitar


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jeremy3220
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« Reply #3 on: March 09, 2008, 11:56:49 PM »

i have a D-60 that i'm interested in modifying to gain a little bit more boom out of. I have bone pins and a bone saddle.

Alot of people say bone pins add to the high end. Out of the few guitars I've tried bone pins in, only one seemed to gain anything in the high end; on the rest if there was a difference it was a only cut in the low end. So I would try plastic or wood pins just for the heck of it.

Strings will make the most difference probably. Others disagree but I think 80/20's have more bass than PB's, I suggest a set of bluegrass or full medium Martin SP 80/20's.
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brandon
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« Reply #4 on: March 10, 2008, 01:58:58 AM »

thanks for the suggestions. it may be time for me to try a different brand of strings just to see if i've become too used to the d'addario's. i think i may try some ebony bridge pins as well to see if it makes any difference.
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brandon

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« Reply #5 on: March 12, 2008, 11:43:38 PM »

Please post after you try ebony pins. I do not believe that they will increase your volume. What style do you play? What about your pick? I would not mess with the bracing or do any "Mods" on the guitar. Maybe the extra oomph from a full set of medium strings will do the trick. Maybe even lighter strings may work. Some people have used lighter strings with a good result, although that has not been my experience. On my L-03, however, it does not make a difference between light and medium. Medium will put out more sound, but not dramaticly so. My Martin only uses mediums, period.

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brandon
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« Reply #6 on: March 13, 2008, 01:10:27 AM »

i will probably be trying out the ebony pins this weekend when i get a chance to go buy some, i think i am first going to try putting a set of regular mediums on first to see if that makes any difference especially since i like the way the bone pins look.
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brandon

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« Reply #7 on: March 13, 2008, 11:18:32 AM »

Take a peek at your break angle on the saddle. I am also suprised no one mentioned making certian that the saddle is perfectly flat along the entire length as well as making certain that the saddle slot is cut properly. You might  be suprised at the extra zing you can get by having the saddle pin holes ramped to achieve the best break angle. If you have a good luthier available the ramping won't be much more than $20-$40 dollars. Good luck.
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